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Results for search "Occupational Health".

24 Aug

Workspace Health

Offices without walls reduce stress and promote physical activity

27 Jun

Breast Density and Disease Risk

Women with dense breasts at higher risk of cancer, new study finds.

26 Jun

Flight Attendants and Radiation Exposure

They're at higher risk of cancer, study finds

Health News Results - 139

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes are supposed to be strong and self-assured, so many don't seek help for mental health issues, a new study finds.

It's not just the stigma of mental illness that prompts many to tough it out alone, but also busy schedules, gender stereotyping and lack of understanding about mental health issues.

That's the consensus of resea...

MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your back aches while on the job, you have plenty of company: New research shows that nearly 40 million American workers suffer from chronic lower back pain.

In all, that's more than a quarter of the workforce reporting lower back pain severe enough to affect their ability to work. As striking as these findings are, the researchers believe t...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Job stress, high blood pressure and poor sleep may be a recipe for an early death, German researchers report.

In a study of nearly 2,000 workers with high blood pressure who were followed for almost 18 years, those who reported having both a stressful job and poor sleep were three times more likely to die from heart disease than those who sl...

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being bullied as a youngster may lead to lifelong struggles in adulthood.

New research warns that victims of teenage bullying face a 40% greater risk for mental health problems by the time they hit their mid-20s.

Young adults with a history of adolescent bullying may also see their odds for unemployment spike by 35%, invest...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of U.S. workplaces now offer wellness programs, a new study finds.

"Most American adults work, and many spend half or more of their waking hours at work," said study author Laura Linnan. She's a professor in the department of health behavior at the University of North Carolina's School of Global Public Health.

"Wher...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

<...

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many American women feel less welcome at work once they become pregnant, a new study finds.

On the other hand, expectant and new fathers often get a career boost.

"We found that pregnant women experienced decreased career encouragement in the workplace only after they disclosed they were pregnant," said study author Samantha Pausti...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your job keeps you chained to a desk all day, you might be able to erase the ill effects with regular exercise, a large new study suggests.

Research has shown that people who spend a lot of time sitting may pay for it with a higher heart disease risk and a shorter lifespan. But the new study, of nearly 150,000 adults, indicates you can avo...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even if you love your job, your workspace might not love you back. Because people may spend 40 or more hours on the job, often at a desk, all that exposure to less-than-inspiring surroundings can negatively influence health.

While some people suffer emotional and physical problems from a stressful job, for others, it's the physical environme...

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Popular workplace "wellness" programs may not offer a big payoff for workers' health or bosses' bottom lines -- at least in the short term, new research suggests.

In a study of one large U.S. company, researchers found that a wellness program led some workers to change their habits: Participants were more likely to say they were exercising a...

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid abuse-related job losses have cost U.S. federal and state governments tens of billions of dollars in lost tax revenue, a new study claims.

Penn State researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health along with estimates of declines in the U.S. labor force due to the opioid epidemic.

Between 2000...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Learning more about firefighters' increased risk for certain cancers is the aim of a voluntary registry being created by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

It's seeking more than 1.1 million firefighters to participate in the National Firefighter Registry.

"Firefighters put their lives on the line...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans work in shifts, and new research suggests it's doing no favors for their cardiovascular health.

The Chinese study of more than 320,000 people found that shift workers are at heightened risk for heart disease, and the more years they work shifts, the greater their risk.

Shift work "can earn more profit, but it c...

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who work at least two night shifts in a week may increase their risk of miscarriage in the next seven days, a new European study finds.

Danish researchers led by Dr. Luise Moelenberg Begtrup, from the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital in Kobenhavn, analyzed data on n...

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screens: They're at work, at home and even in the palm of your hand. But stare too long at them and your eyes -- and mind -- could pay a price, experts warn.

For example, too much screen time can lead to problems such as eye strain, dry eye, headaches and insomnia, the American Academy of Ophthalmology warns.

"Eyestrain can be fr...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite years of worry over young doctors' grueling work hours, a new study finds that longer shifts do not jeopardize patients' safety.

The trial is one of two recent efforts to test an assumption about doctors' work hours -- that shorter hospital shifts should mean better-rested physicians and fewer medical errors.

In 2011, new ...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- More than 40 leading CEOs from around the country have issued a step-by-step plan to improve mental health in the workplace.

The executives released a report Tuesday called "Mental Health: A Workforce Crisis" as part of a leadership collaborative called the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable that includes executives f...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Feeling trapped behind a desk, a counter or on the factory floor does no favors for the mind.

Now, research helps confirm that women with jobs that demand long hours may be more prone to depression.

Researchers found that compared with women who worked a standard 40-hour week, those who were on the clock 55 hours or more typically r...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Deceased people who are cremated after having been treated with radioactive medications might be a health hazard to crematory operators, a new case study shows.

An Arizona crematorium became contaminated with radiation following the cremation of a man who received "radiopharmaceutical" treatment two days before he died, according to a resear...

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For decades, U.S. doctors have battled the long hours and demanding schedules that often lead to "burnout." But a new study brings welcome news, showing a slight decline in the numbers of physicians dealing with the issue.

In the third of a series of studies, researchers surveyed more than 5,400 doctors nationwide and found that 44 percent rep...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Candy dishes, cupcakes and cookies abound in the typical office, so if you're striving to eat healthy, the workplace can be a culinary minefield.

Researchers surveyed more than 5,000 people and found that about one in four working adults said they got food or beverages from work at least once a week. Many of those foods were high in calorie...

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As increasing numbers of Americans use marijuana, there is a rising risk of job loss among those who use the drug, a new study suggests.

"Job loss may be an overlooked social cost of marijuana use," said study author Cassandra Okechukwu, from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and colleagues.

For the study, researchers a...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Every day they help feed, bathe and care for the frailest Americans. But female health care workers in the United States often get shortchanged on wages and health insurance, a new study finds.

In fact, about one-third of female health care workers made less than $15 an hour, and that number rose to half when these workers were black or His...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a novel idea, but joining a choir at work might lower your stress levels while on the job, a new British study suggests.

It included 58 people who were part of workplace choirs in different organizations. They completed questionnaires that assessed their work-related demands, control and support.

Being part of a workplace choi...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- We know that the amount of sitting Americans do is now considered a health threat. Researchers estimate that the average adult spends more than 8 hours a day being sedentary, and it's not just all that time spent in front of the TV.

If you have a desk job and get home too exhausted to do more than plop on the sofa, that number can double.

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Losing a job or taking a big pay cut is hard on more than just your checkbook -- it might drastically increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death.

A new study finds that people who endure large swings in income over the years are much more likely to develop heart disease or suffer a premature death.

"We found t...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After having a stroke, heart attack or cardiac arrest, people are less likely to be employed than their healthy peers, new research shows.

Even if they are working, they may earn significantly less than people who haven't had a stroke or heart event, the investigators found.

Although the majority of people who have one of these seriou...

TUESDAY, Jan. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some career advice for the new year.

Experts often suggest that people follow their passion when looking for work that they'll feel enriched by. But sometimes you don't have a choice and have to take a job that you're not quite wild about, to put it mildly.

But rather than feel resentful and unhappy every day, over time you ca...

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women juggling a medical career and motherhood often face significant workplace discrimination, a new study finds.

Researchers conducted an online survey of U.S. doctors who were mothers. The age range was 24 to 62, and most worked more than 40 hours a week.

Common complaints included less chance of career development; financial pe...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to metals and pesticides at work could increase risk of heart disease, researchers say.

Hispanic workers in the United States may be especially vulnerable because of language barriers and lower levels of education, the study authors noted.

"Exposure to metals and pesticides is common worldwide, and this study highlights t...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a good economy, the care at U.S. nursing homes falls because it's harder to attract and keep staff, a new study contends.

"During economic downturns, many people are willing to take positions with work environments they may not prefer because there aren't many options," said principal investigator Sean Shenghsiu Huang.

"But when ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's no surprise that many Americans are working overtime. Conservative estimates say that 19 percent of adults put in 48 hours or more a week and 7 percent log in 60 or more.

But what you might not realize is that, after a certain point, extra hours could be hurting both your health and your productivity.

In addition to a variety ...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Rotating night-shift work together with an unhealthy lifestyle significantly increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, researchers say.

"Most cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented by adherence to a healthy lifestyle, and the benefits could be larger in rotating night-shift workers," said study authors led by Zhilei Shan. He is a nutritio...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Couch Potato Nation: Nearly half of Americans sit for far too many hours a day and don't get any exercise at all, a new study finds.

A survey of some 5,900 adults found that nearly 26 percent sit for more than eight hours a day, 45 percent don't get any moderate or vigorous exercise during the week, and about 11 percent sit more than eight h...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're bullied by a bad boss or co-worker, your heart may pay the price, new research shows.

Victims of on-the-job bullying or violence faced a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, the researchers found.

The new study of more than 79,000 European workers couldn't prove cause and effect. But if there is a causal link, ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of suicide among U.S. workers has jumped 34 percent since 2000, and certain occupations seem to be riskier than others, government health researchers report.

Those most at risk: men with construction and extraction jobs, and women in arts, design, entertainment, sports and media, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many injured workers turn to opioid painkillers for relief, and nearly 30 percent may still be taking them three months after their injury -- increasing the odds of addiction, a new study suggests.

"The increased likelihood of persistent opioid use among strain and sprain injuries is potentially concerning, particularly given the limited evide...

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- "Sit-stand" desks can get office workers on their feet more often -- and improve their well-being along the way, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that when they swapped out traditional office desks for sit-stand versions, workers stayed on their feet for an extra 80 minutes on the average workday.

And over one year, that tra...

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency departments are becoming increasingly violent places as doctors bear the brunt of fallout from the opioid epidemic, a new survey shows.

Nearly half of American emergency physicians said they have been physically assaulted at work, and three in five report those assaults happened during the past year, according to a new poll commissio...

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Minority medical residents routinely face bias and comments that can subtly reveal racial, ethnic or religious slights or preconceptions, a new study suggests.

In the United States, black, Hispanic and Native Americans make up one-third of the population but only 9 percent of practicing doctors.

For the new study, researchers led ...

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout affects nearly half of all resident physicians in the United States, raising their risk for serious mistakes, a new study finds.

Also, many of these young doctors regret their career choice, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland.

Specialties w...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You're much more likely to receive poor or unprofessional health care if your doctor suffers from burnout, a new analysis contends.

Physicians who feel burned out are twice as likely to make a mistake that endangers patient safety or to behave in an unprofessional manner, according to the review.

It's even worse for young doctors....

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many studies have pointed to the serious health threats of long periods of uninterrupted sitting at home or at work.

Even if you get in a 30-minute exercise session a day, that may not be enough to undo all the damage of sitting.

An overall sedentary lifestyle has been linked to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers and p...

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Maybe it's time to retire the office cubicle.

A new study suggests that open workspaces without partitions between desks encourage employees to be more active and help curb stress.

"We are becoming an increasingly sedentary workforce, and anything that we can do, even passively, to nudge physical activity up will have enormous bene...

MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience rudeness and other incivilities at work are likely to be stricter with their own kids, a new study claims.

Canadian researchers conducted an online survey of 146 working mothers and their spouses. The mothers were asked about incivility at work and how effective they felt as parents, and their spouses were asked about the ...

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A "power gap" between doctors and nurses contributes to poor communication that puts hospital patients at risk, a new study contends.

To learn more about communication breakdowns between the two groups, researchers recorded doctor-nurse interactions at the University of Michigan Health System. Doctors and nurses were then asked to critique the...

TUESDAY, July 31, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Researchers may have developed a more reliable way to predict the risk of heart attack and stroke in astronauts -- and the technique may eventually help gauge the same danger for regular folks on Earth, too.

NASA astronauts currently undergo a special screening method that scans coronary arteries for a buildup of calcified plaque...

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- After five weeks off recovering from her heart attack, Melissa Murphy looked forward to returning to her job.

"I'm back out, and I'm contributing again," the Iowa mother of two remembered thinking. "I'm not a victim, which is how you sometimes feel when you're sitting on your couch and everybody leaves to go to work or school a...

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Employees struggling with depression take less time off from work if they receive support and help from their managers, a new study suggests.

Many people suffer depression at some point during their working lives. But they often don't disclose their condition or seek help because they're afraid of repercussions, according to the researchers.<...

MONDAY, July 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You've probably heard the health warning: Sitting is the new smoking.

The importance of getting up and walking to prevent serious health issues when you sit at a desk all day long has gotten a lot of attention recently.

Those health risks include increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess weight and high cholesterol levels, ...

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Wellness Library Results - 122

The chemical plant worker wore safety glasses -- a fine item of protective equipment in its proper place, but the wrong kind for the particular hazard he faced. When a mishap occurred, alcohol fumes wafted around the safety glasses and injured the man's eyes. The metalworker at a mom-and-pop workshop wore no eye or face protection as he dumped concentrated sodium hydroxide into a water bath. The r...

Perhaps the greatest threat of injury on the job comes from the welding fumes. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the risks depend on the workplace conditions and the materials being welded: Nickel, for example, can cause asthma and cancer, manganese can cause Parkinson's disease, and zinc can cause flu-like symptoms. Certain coatings, like paints, resi...

In an overall environment of physical danger where there is little margin for error, the specter of trench cave-ins looms particularly large. Federal reports show that working near unstable ground or in trenches, excavations, or other confined spaces that aren't properly shored up may invite disaster. In one case, a 35-year-old man working in an unreinforced trench died when the walls of a manhole...

It wasn't that long ago that a California man in his mid-30s walked into a doctor's office with such astronomical levels of lead in his blood that he was barred from returning to work. Alarmed, health officials began looking into his workplace, the Alco Iron and Scrap Metal Co. in San Leandro, California. What they found at Alco was shocking: So much lead dust permeated the plant's atmosphere that...

No one would consider being an accountant as dangerous an occupation as, say, race-car driving or coal-mining. But Alan Franciscus, a former accountant at a software company in San Francisco, says the profession has its own set of hazards. He suffered anxiety attacks from work-related stress, eye strain from staring at numbers on a computer monitor, and body aches from sitting at a desk all day. ...

When teenagers go job hunting, they often have just one thing in mind: money -- money for dates, college, or even their family's rent and groceries. They aren't worried about long-term job security or climbing the career ladder. And for the most part, they don't even think about job safety. They're young and invincible, and nobody would give them an unsafe job... right? Wrong. Job safety may be n...

Fifteen years after taxi drivers began lobbying for protections against the alarming assaults and murders plaguing cabbies across the country, the federal government weighed in on the issue. In the spring of 2000, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) warned of the dangers of driving a cab -- taxi drivers today are in the top ten occupations with the highest homicide rates -- a...

In December 2010, the Broadway audience watching a preview of the stage musical "Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark" saw the webbed avenger poised on a bridge, about to swing through space to rescue his girlfriend, Mary Jane. But as he leaped off the edge, his safety harness flew open, dropping him more than 30 feet to the orchestra pit in front of the horrified patrons. The show abruptly ended, with ...

Aerobics teacher Debra Lanham knew she wasn't supposed to jump on the job, but she did anyway. She loved her job teaching aerobics at several gyms in San Francisco so much that once in front of a class, she was barely aware of the pain from heel spur syndrome and plantar fasciitis. And the high-energy music she played during class made her forget her injuries as well. "I'd turn up the music, reall...

One summer day, Rebecca "Lambchop" Reilly was speeding through the streets of Washington D.C. The 31-year-old bike messenger was making great time until a nearby Mercedes made a sudden bid for a parking space. On the spur of the moment, the driver decided to wedge her car into one of the few available parking spaces. The back tire of Reilly's bike got caught on the back of the Mercedes, which pull...

Eric Barkley, a software engineer with Computer Sciences in Los Angeles, never even has to think twice when asked to work overtime. Even in his off-hours -- whether at home or work -- the affable 40-year-old can most often be found in his favorite spot: smack in front of a glowing computer screen. But like many other programmers, Barkley has suffered the consequences of his long-standing love affa...

Vulcan, the Roman god of the forge, was ugly and lame, the revered misfit who crafted weapons and armor for his swift and beautiful relatives on Mount Olympus. Like their mythical forebear, modern blacksmiths wrestle with iron and fire and carry the marks of the craft on their bodies. "My right eye is held in place with a plastic cup," says Rob Edwards, editor of The Anvil magazine. "When I go to...

Her scrunched-up shoulders and urge to weep when she got to work told Christine Zook all she needed to know about her future as a bus driver. Zook used to drive a bus for an urban transit district in Northern California. There was much about the job that she loved, especially the economic rewards -- decent pay, good family medical benefits, and a great pension. But after 10 years behind the wheel...

Cindi Trahan tries to joke away her stress from on-the-job sex discrimination and harassment -- and the death threats she said she got for complaining. An air traffic controller, she said she had to manage in-bound 747s while fending off lewd propositions from her married manager. So unnerving and distracting were his attentions that she worried the planes she was tracking might be in danger. Sex ...

Summer was starting and Robin Shahar had it made. She'd graduated sixth in her class at Emory Law School and was getting ready to start a new job as a staff attorney at the legal office where she'd worked as a law clerk the previous summer. And she was in love and preparing to solemnify her commitment in a Jewish ceremony that July. But Shahar's love was a woman, and when her new employer found ou...

Greg Bellisime gets envious comments when he talks about the five weeks he took off after the birth of his daughter, Beatrice. Even after his time off, he returned to work only three days a week, saving most of his week to care for his wife and daughter. Bellisime, a 35-year-old inventory manager for Patagonia outdoor clothing company in Ventura, California, wanted to make sure his wife was recupe...

It takes light skin and thin lips to be a good bank teller -- at least according to a former personnel officer at the First Alabama Bank in Mobile. The officer's notes, jotted down during interviews, say it all: One prospective teller was described as "an attractive white female, blond hair, blue eyes, teller-type appearance." Another: "very large lips and hips, overweight, dark skin, black girl, ...

As a freelance cameraman for domestic and international news outlets for 16 years, David Lee has witnessed disaster on an epic scale. His work has taken him far and wide in search of some of the most vivid images of the last quarter century. In 1986, he landed in Mexico City after one of the country's most devastating earthquakes. Then, during the Los Angeles race riots in 1992 that followed the a...

Just days before the school principal called her in on a parent's complaint in fall 1999, it occurred to teacher Ellen Hayward that she had been crossing the line in the classroom for some time. "I didn't have the same patience with the kids," recalls the 56-year-old Hayward. "I was getting more volatile and losing my temper. I don't know how I kept working." The teacher's apparent personality ch...

It began as an ordinary day on the job. A 31-year-old carpenter was replacing the roof of a house in Pennsylvania, standing on an aluminum ladder-jack scaffold while he made some adjustments. Then the aluminum drip edging he was installing accidentally bumped the 7,200-volt power line located just above the roof. The current from the line roared through the man's body, killing him instantly. That...

Like many college students, Kathy Morrison was an expert at remote learning. While her professors lectured on physics and Shakespeare, Morrison would often stay in bed, giving herself a remote chance to pass. She had her reasons for skipping classes. Sometimes she was exhausted from the odd jobs she held to help pay her tuition -- babysitter, cocktail waitress, and convenience store clerk, among ...

Scott Opperman, 38, had been at his new job in Connecticut for only a month when it happened. He was doing exactly the kind of work he'd done for the past 16 years, but early one winter afternoon, the journeyman carpenter went hurtling through an open second-story window. He'd been standing on a stepladder and drilling into a window frame when the drill slipped, and he lost his balance. Falling 14...

Longtime mechanic Carlos Contreras says, "a million things can go wrong when working on a car." And a lot of them hurt like heck. Once, while changing a brake drum, Contreras gouged his forehead on a sharp metal shaft sticking out from the wheel well. He jerked back in pain, only to bang his head against the fender. It was almost a moment of slapstick, but Contreras wasn't laughing. And if he hadn...

If someone suspicious walks into a Ricker's convenience store in Anderson, Indiana, supervisor Tracy Fowler won't be caught with her guard down. Mindful that there's always the potential for a robbery, Fowler says she's vigilant when a suspicious shopper moves through the store. "You should always keep eye contact," she says. "If you keep eye contact with someone and say something, I think it mak...

Grinning slyly, a coworker beckons you into his office. He says he has something for you to look at. You round his desk to take a look at the material he's indicated, then step back -- revolted, angry, and embarrassed. It's pornography. He's called you over to get your reaction to magazine photos of nude women in sexual poses. And he's standing there enjoying your distress. There's another scenari...

If Robert Unsworth hadn't been passionate about cooking since childhood, becoming a chef would have immediately killed his pleasure in the job. Standing all day on rock-hard cement floors, often without a single break, strained his back for the eight years he worked as a cook. He tolerated grueling 12-hour days and collapsed after work. The final blow, however, wasn't the punishing seven-day work ...

When you step into your workplace, doesn't it look different than it did just a few years ago? Nationally, these are some of the changes we are experiencing. Women and minorities account for roughly 46 and 30 percent, respectively, of the U.S. workforce. 18.6 million physically and mentally challenged -- but able -- workers are in the workforce as well. An estimated 10 percent of the population is...

Carl von Czoernig, a deputy sheriff in a small county in Ohio, started every workday with an involuntary ritual. After showering and shaving, he'd vomit in the toilet. Then he'd grab a fistful of Rolaids (known in law enforcement as "cop candy") to keep his stomach settled during the day ahead. No doubt about it, police officers work a dangerous beat. Every year, close to 60,000 cops are attacked...

"Dancing engages your body, mind, and spirit in such a complete way that it's thoroughly exhausting and thrilling," says former Feld Ballet dancer Buffy Miller, reflecting on the wonders and hardships of her calling. "It uses your whole self -- that's what I love about it." Dance may be thrilling, but as with most other professions, the exhilaration comes after years of unswerving dedication and ...

Theresa Quillen, a day-care worker for the last 20 years in Philadelphia, deeply loves children -- even the one who sent her to the hospital. The 3-year-old boy didn't mean to hurt her. He just happened to be standing around when another 3-year-old was looking for someone to punch. Quillen rushed to pull the boy out of harm's way. "As soon as I picked him up, I felt a sharp pain in my back," she ...

As a dentist for more than 30 years, Mike Downing, DDS, of Billings, Montana, has seen human fear in all its forms, from nervous twitches and darting eyes to outright crying -- and not just from kids, either. But when Downing puts on his mask and picks up a drill, he feels calm and confident. In the end, most patients relax after a little small talk. And while dentistry can be a tricky and stress...

Sixty feet below the water's surface off Key Largo, the Aquarius, the last underwater science habitat in the world, was caught in a maelstrom. As Hurricane Gordon's churning waves battered the giant yellow cylinder, Aquarius was reduced to auxiliary battery power. Worse, its generators had shut down and one had caught fire. As the ailing vessel devoured its remaining power, those inside began a ...

It took a freak accident to get pediatrician Betsy MacGregor to do something about a life on the verge of breakdown. MacGregor had always been passionate about her job, and for 15 years she thrived as head of adolescent medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York Center. Working with teens, she says, taught her that medicine should treat the whole person, not just the disease. So engrossin...

At 17, Cody Geurin was working the night shift at a Washington fast-food restaurant when one of the pressure cookers began to release steam early in its cycle. Before he could react, the lid burst open, spraying him with eight gallons of scalding oil. "It got my arms, face, and luckily my fry apron first," he says. "As I turned away from the spray, it doused my back. I ripped my rubber gloves off ...

Avoiding falls Over the past 20 years, thousands of construction workers have fallen to their death -- many of them from ladders and scaffolds. Here is how you can protect yourself:

  • Get trained on how to use this equipment and how much weight it can safely hold.
  • Ensure scaffolds and ladders are inspected before each shift, as well as extended three feet above roofs or floors and...

John Sevcik is an exceptionally meticulous man. Whether tending his yard or repairing a porch railing, he'll check, then recheck every detail -- once, twice, maybe even three times. No, he's not obsessive-compulsive. It's that as an electrician, he likes to play it 100 percent safe -- all the time. "You have to have a healthy respect for electricity," says Sevcik, who has worked as an electrician...

Like almost every rancher within 40 miles of Big Timber, Montana, 43-year-old Doug Lair raises sheep. (There's a reason the local high school sports teams are known as the "Fighting Sheepherders.") Lair is typical in another way, too: He no longer has his full allotment of thumbs. A few years ago, Lair was planting fence poles with a metal device called a "post pounder." His mind wandered for a ...

"The Perfect Storm," which portrays the deadly voyage of a small swordfish boat in Massachusetts, gave many moviegoers their first glimpse into the risks of commercial fishers. For Marcus Ballweber, who has spent the past 13 years working in the Alaskan fishing industry, many of the hazards depicted on the big screen are all too familiar. Ballweber once saw a massive wave knock a man from his bun...

As a young employee at McDonald's, Tom Smith learned early that he would have to be careful with more than just flipping burgers. Although the restaurant enforced strict safety rules, one night while routinely cleaning the grill, Smith didn't put on the insulated, fireproof gloves provided by the restaurant. When his arm slipped onto the grill, he sustained a nasty burn. "I thought I knew everythi...

Every year, more than 100 firefighters die in the line of duty. Here are some recommendations from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for saving firefighters' lives:

  • Reduce on-duty heart attacks by screening, minimizing stress, and encouraging physician involvement. NIOSH -- whose fatality investigations include many firefighters felled by sudden cardiac arrest -- re...

No one will forget the devastating collapse of the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001. Nor will we likely forget the images of the heroic firefighters who tried to save those who might still be alive under the 110 floors of collapsed concrete and steel. The search stretched on for weeks and was exceedingly dangerous. Every time rubble was moved, it created a vent for oxygen to feed the sm...

William Counce loves football. He also loves parties. He particularly loves chatting about football at parties. That's why he was so upset at one social gathering when the woman with whom he was having a lively discussion about the University of Tennessee football team asked him what he did for a living. He told her he was a funeral director. "There was dead silence," recalls Counce, who is also...

Garbage collector David Richard was on his usual pickup route in Boca Raton, Florida, when a fluke accident ended his life. No one knows what happened, but Richards was standing behind his truck when it started moving in reverse. It knocked him over, dragging him 20 feet before crashing through a fence. Firefighters found him dead when they arrived. At first glance, garbage collecting may not see...

With all of the grim, nasty jobs out there, gardeners know they have it good. All other things being equal, would anyone really rather stand in an assembly line or sit at a desk than kneel in a rose bed? But as Bonnie Lee Appleton and many others have found out, it's easy to get too much of a good thing. A professional horticulturalist and gardener for the last 30 years, Appleton has spent more t...

Gardening is relaxing and gratifying, but there are still things to watch out for. Here's a rundown of common gardening hazards, along with some tips to help you avoid them:

  • Stretch before you start work. Backs, shoulders, arms, and hands get the brunt of the abuse from tilling the soil all day. A good routine of stretching exercises before you begin will help to get your muscles ready an...

Janice Williams worked for more than two decades as a cashier at an Oakland, California supermarket without sustaining a single injury. But shortly after the store installed electronic scanners in 1993, she began feeling twinges of pain in her right hand and arm. "On the older machines, you could rest your hands," recalls Williams, a shop steward with the United Food and Commercial Workers union ...

Jenny Blair, a hairdresser for two years in Minnesota, has the kind of enthusiasm for her work that other people might envy. "I love having social time at work," Blair says. "There are constantly people stopping in -- I get my social and work time done at the same time. And I love being able to be creative and make a good living." Her zeal is shared by many people who cut hair for a living, says...

When Pilar Medrano arrived at her janitorial job in a Los Angeles office building one day in September 1999, her boss handed her a bottle of an unfamiliar liquid and told her to remove some stains in the carpet. Medrano had no idea how much trouble this seemingly simple chore would cause her. "While I was cleaning, some of the liquid sprayed on my face," she says through a Spanish interpreter. "T...

Faye Morris, RN, spent 15 years working as a hospital nurse, an often stressful and exhausting job by anyone's standards. But that wasn't the job that broke her back. Three years ago, Morris, 45, left hospitals behind to start a new career as an in-home nurse with Alacare Home Health Services in Birmingham, Alabama. One afternoon in the summer of 1999, she stepped out of a patient's house into th...

The law partners at Cook, Yancey, King & Galloway knew they had a problem. One of the Shreveport, Louisiana, firm's best lawyers and a 20-year partner, Ed Blewer Jr., was clearly drinking too much. The year was 1980, and the partners held what today would be known as an intervention. They sequestered Blewer in a room and told him point blank: although he was a good lawyer and they cared about ...

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