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MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast cancer commonly see their sexual health decline, yet their doctors aren't telling them what to expect -- or what to do about it.

Those are among the findings of a new study that asked breast cancer patients about...

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Social isolation and loneliness put people at a 30% higher risk of heart attack, stroke or death from either, a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

The statement also highlights the lack of data on interventions that could improve heart health in isolated or lonely people. It was published Aug. 4 in the

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Kids with type 1 diabetes and their closest relatives are more likely to experience mental health issues than people without the disease, Swedish researchers report.

“Many clinicians assume intuitively that diabetes in a child negatively affects the mental health of both the patient and the family members,” said study co-author Agnieszka Butwi...

THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- In a world where everyone spends more and more time with eyes fixed on their phones, new research suggests young people feel happier after socializing with friends in person rather than virtually.

The conclusion is an outgrowth of nearly four years spent analyzing how social habits of more than 3,000 college students affected t...

THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Socializing, taking classes and exercising may boost your brain's cognitive reserve and stave off memory and thinking problems down the road, a new study suggests.

Cognitive reserve refers to the brain's ability to withstand the...

A tight deadline at work. A tough exam at school. A big vacation that requires tons of planning. A home repair that’s gone awry.

These sources of stress are anything but pleasant, but a new study suggests that they might actually be good...

For peak performance, school-age children need more than a healthy diet and exercise. They also need plenty of sleep.

A new study finds that elementary school kids who get less than nine hours of sleep each night show significant differences in some brain regions responsible for memory, intelligence and well-being compared to those who get the advised nine to 12 hours' sleep.

“We ...

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) – A quality called “grit” can help a person achieve their long-term goals, some experts say.

And playing sports as a kid – or even as an adult – can help a person gain that passion and perseverance, according to new research that found adults who played sports as kids scored higher on a measurement of grit than adults who never played or sa...

Don’t be afraid of Sunday night.

Good sleep habits can ward off the so-called “Sunday scaries” — the worry about returning to work on Monday morning that keeps many folks tossing and turning on Sunday night.

A recent American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 1, 2022
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  • The notion that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain has become widespread among the general public.

    But there’s actually no hard evidence that the brain chemical

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • A half-century-old diabetes drug appears to help treat bipolar disorder by reversing patients’ insulin resistance, according to a small-scale clinical trial.

    Bipolar patients who responded to the drug metformin experienced improvement in their

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • While depression is common after a stroke, most stroke patients who need mental health care aren't getting the help they need, new research reveals.

    Roughly one in three stroke victims have depression. But about two-thirds of those received no mental health treatment. Patients who were older, men, Black people or Hispanic folks were even less likely to get help, the study found.

    “...

    Having friends in childhood may help keep you clean and sober as a young adult, new research suggests.

    Researchers from Arizona State University (ASU) interviewed more than 300 college students who participated in assessments that focused on childhood loneliness, stress levels and drinking behaviors. The results determined there was a link between feelings of loneliness in their pre-adole...

    American society may seem more fractured than ever, but cooperation among total strangers has been on the upswing for decades, researchers in China say.

    Their conclusion emerged from an analysis of more than 500 studies that tracked cooperation patterns over the past six decades.

    The upshot, ...

    FRIDAY, July 15, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- As a teenager, April Summerford suffered from extremely painful periods that made her suspect something was wrong with her body.

    Summerford didn't know it, but she had

    Starting Saturday, if you or someone you know is contemplating suicide or having a mental health crisis, you can dial just three numbers -- 988 -- to get help.

    Callers will be connected to a trained counselor at a local call center and ultimately routed to potentially lifesaving support services. The three-digit co...

    While many people suffer from depression after a stroke, a new study suggests depression often occurs beforehand and may be a warning sign.

    "The study underscores why doctors need to monitor for symptoms of depression long term in people who have had strokes," said study author...

    As rates of teenage anxiety and depression climb in the United States, parents and teachers are rushing to solve the mental health crisis.

    Some have proposed mindfulness training in schools as a therapeutic tool, but a review of studies out of the United Kingdom indicates it may be time to consid...

    About eight months after Ari Toumpas, a transgender woman, began the process of transitioning both socially and medically, she began to think about her voice.

    A language teacher and graduate student at Ohio State University, Toumpas had been trying some vocal feminization exercises she had discovered online, but was not having success.

    A referral from her primary care doctor led To...

    From the ongoing pandemic and the monkeypox outbreak to the charged political landscape, New York City mom and entrepreneur Lyss Stern has been increasingly anxious.

    Stern worries that she will pass all of this fretting down to her 8-year-old daughter, and a new study suggests she just might.

    "Children may be more likely to learn anxious behavior if it is being displayed by their s...

    Want to get fit and stay fit? Arlington, Va., may be the city for you: For the fifth year in a row, it has been named the fittest city in America.

    Meanwhile, the title of the least fit city goes to Oklahoma City, according to the annual fitnes...

    If you've ever hesitated to text or email friends you haven't seen in a while, a new study has a reassuring message: They'll probably appreciate it more than you think.

    In a series of experiments involving nearly 6,000 adults, researchers found that, in general, people underestimated the value of "reaching out" to someone in their social circle they hadn't contacted in a while.

    Reci...

    Want to feel you matter after you retire? Start socializing, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis found that positive connections with other people were associated with a sense of purposefulness in older adults.

    Having a sense of purpose is...

    Transgender patients who get gender-affirming surgery to create more feminine facial features say it's a big boost to their mental health, a new study reports.

    Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), compared the mental health of 107 patients awaiting surgery to that of 62 individuals who had completed it roughly six months earlier. People who had received the pro...

    If you are feeling stressed and depressed, new research suggests that grabbing a trowel and getting your hands dirty may improve your mood.

    Researchers found that tending to plants can reap mental health benefits, even for first-time gardeners. The activity was linked to decreased stress, anxiety and depression in h...

    It takes much less than a "Matrix" plot to make American workers afraid for their jobs: New research reveals they stress out when they have to work alongside robots.

    Even though many robots took on the most dangero...

    Nearly all Americans are worried about inflation as economic worries oust COVID-19 as the nation's top source of stress, a new poll reveals.

    Nearly nine out of 10 Americans (87%) said they are anxious or very anxious about inflation, up 8 percentage points from the previous month, according to...

    The concept of "hangry" helps sell candy bars, and it's a convenient excuse to snap at someone when you're in a foul mood.

    But is hangry -- being angry when you're hungry -- a real thing? Do people really become more irritable when they want food?

    "My wife sometimes used to tell me, 'you're being hangry.' And I kind of always thought that's not a real thing -- it's not a real psycho...

    Diane Kondyra knows a lot about the hidden dangers of diabetes.

    Both she and her husband have been diagnosed with the blood sugar disease, and her husband suffered one of its devastating complications in 2018 when he developed a staph infection that cost him part of his leg. Uncontrolled diabetes can restrict blood flow to the legs, making it more likely that simple cuts can turn int...

    Who you voted for at the ballot box may have the most influence over whether you've gotten a COVID-19 booster shot.

    Researchers studying vaccine hesitancy two years into the pandemic

    New research confirms the dangers of too much screen time for kids and teens: Those who play sports, take music lessons, or socialize with friends after school are happier and healthier than children who are glued to a screen during these hours.

    "Scr...

    Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

    Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male or female doctor who was either Black, white or Asian.

    White patients appeared to improve faster when treated by a...

    How sympathetic a rich person feels toward those of lesser means may be influenced by whether they were born rich or became rich during their lifetime.

    And not in the way you might expect: New research found that those who started out poor were less likely to be sympathetic to those who remained poor.

    "In the United States, we find that people expect those who became rich to be mor...

    Adolescents who experience cyberbullying are more likely to think about suicide, a new study shows.

    Researchers found a link between being bullied online, through texts or on social media, and thoughts of suicide that go above and beyond the link between suicidal thoughts and traditional offline bullying.<...

    Most people have heard that women can experience depression after the birth of a child.

    But the condition is not limited to moms: New dads can experience depression in the months after their baby is born, by all accounts an enormous life change. This can even happen simultaneously, and with consequences for each of them and their new baby.

    To better understand these experiences, res...

    Are you plagued by FOMO -- "fear of missing out"? Then silencing your smartphone may not be the stress-buster you think it is.

    That's the takeaway from a new study that found many folks check their phones a lot more when they're set to mute or vibrate than when they beep and ring.

    "Without any clear 'buzz' or sou...

    You and your best friend may have your noses to thank in helping bring you together, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that pairs of friends who'd just "clicked" upon meeting tended to smell more alike, compared to random pairs of strangers. What's more, a high-tech electronic nose was able to predict, based on body odor, which strangers would hit it off during their first interacti...

    Hate crime laws that protect gay, lesbian and transgender people may have an unexpected benefit: fewer teen suicide attempts, among kids of all sexual orientations.

    That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at what happened in U.S. states that enacted hate crime laws with protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning individuals. It found that

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 23, 2022
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  • In a cancel culture where there's zero tolerance for prejudice, at least one form of discrimination appears to be alive and well.

    Ageism involves prejudice based on people's advancing age. It can be as overt as not hiring someone because they are older, or as subtle as giving a loved one a...

    Heartache and heartbreak are apt terms for the intense grief caused by losing a spouse.

    A new study says such a loss can lead to major health problems and even death, and the paper may help explain why that happens.

    When faced with stressful situations, grieving spouses have significant increases in

    The key to a long life may be your attitude.

    Researchers at Harvard studied the impact of optimism on women's lifespans, finding that optimism was associated with greater longevity, such as living past age 90.

    Lead study author Hayami Koga, a PhD candidate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, decided instead of studying risk factors, she wanted to look at posi...

    Many people think they make healthy food choices, but they may be viewing their diet through rose-colored glasses.

    That's the main finding of a new study that aimed to identify disconnects between how healthfully Americans think they eat and how they actually do.

    "It appears difficult for adults in the United States to accurately assess the quality of their diet, and most adults bel...

    The expression "plays well with others" is often tossed around to describe people who are less likely to ruffle feathers, and new research shows these sandbox skills really matter.

    It turns out that kids who play well with others in preschool are less likely to experience mental health issues ...

    One American city's "radical" approach to handling low-level 911 calls -- sending mental health professionals rather than police -- may have taken a bite out of crime, a new study finds.

    The study evaluated Denver's

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 13, 2022
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  • People with anorexia nervosa show significant shrinkage in three important areas of the brain, new research reveals.

    The researchers said their study findings highlight the importance of early treatment, to prevent long-term structural brain changes in people with...

    The mental health equivalent of 911 is about to launch across the United States, but a new study finds that many communities may not be prepared for it.

    Beginning July 16, a new 988 number will be available 24/7 for Americans dealing with a mental health crisis

    There is a "staggering" gap between the number of Americans who need care for anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions and those who can actually get it, a new survey shows.

    In all, 42% of U.S. adults who needed care in the previous 12 months did not get it because of costs and other barriers, according to the online survey from the National Council for Mental Wellbeing. Nea...

    People who've been through a bout of COVID may be more vulnerable to mental health disorders in the months following their infection, a new study warns.

    Researchers analyzed data on more than 46,000 people in the United States who tested positive for COVID-19 and an equal number of people with other types of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 8, 2022
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  • New research points to a compelling interplay between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression.

    IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to the physical pain that these illnesses c...

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