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Results for search "Cancer: Misc.".

12 Apr

Personalized Cancer Vaccines Showing Promise Against Multiple Tumor Types, New Study Finds

Researchers say administering therapeutic cancer vaccines earlier in treatment may be more effective

11 Jun

Latest in Cancer Prevention: Move More, Ditch Beer and Bacon

The American Cancer Society updates its guidelines for cancer prevention.

Health News Results - 532

MONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Being obese or overweight can increase the odds of developing several types of cancers, new research from the United Kingdom reveals.

But shedding the excess pounds can lower the risk, researchers say.

Reducing obesity cuts the risk for endometrial cancer by 44% and uterine cancer by 39%, and could also prevent 18% of kidn...

Fighting cancer can be a lonely battle, and new research shows that the coronavirus pandemic has made the experience even more isolating.

Studies conducted before the pandemic found that 32% to 47% of cancer patients were lonely, but in late May of 2020 roughly 53% of 606 cancer patients reported loneliness.

Those who were lonely had higher rates of social isolation and more severe ...

FRIDAY, May 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of colon cancer among young Americans are on the rise, and a new study suggests that drinking too many sugary beverages may be to blame -- at least for women.

Women who drank two or more sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda, fruity drinks or sports and energy drinks per day had double the risk of developing colon cancer b...

Having close relatives with colon polyps — which can be precursors of cancer — could mean that you have a higher risk for colon cancer, researchers say.

Colon cancer is the second deadliest form of cancer in the world, according to the World Health Organization.

Being overweight and inactive increases the risk, but genetics also play a role, researchers in Sweden and Boston sa...

Nearly 10 million cancer screenings have been missed in the United States during the coronavirus pandemic, researchers report.

The investigators analyzed data on three types of cancer for which early screenings are most beneficial — breast, colon and prostate — and found that 9.4 million screenings for these cancers did not occur in the United States due to COVID-19.

Screenings ...

TUESDAY, May 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A first-of-its-kind study suggests that slow-growing breast cancers can be treated with a highly targeted tumor-freezing technique, eliminating the need for invasive surgery.

Testing to date suggests that the technique is effective among women over 60 diagnosed with relatively low-risk breast cancer.

"Cryoablation is ...

TUESDAY, May 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, breast cancer experts realized space in operating rooms and hospitals could become scarce. That meant rethinking standard care, to provide the best way to treat patients under these suddenly restricted conditions.

One of the new ideas: Reverse the order of care given to patients with a type of b...

Cancer patients most likely to sign up for clinical trials during their treatment include people of color, those with higher incomes and those who are younger, a new study finds.

"This study informs our understanding of who is participating in cancer clinical trials," said study author Dr. Lincoln Sheets, an assistant research professor at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, in...

Cancer might seem like a modern problem, but new research has revealed that it affected up to 14% of adults in medieval Britain.

University of Cambridge researchers used X-rays and CT scans to search for evidence of cancer inside skeletal remains excavated as part of an ongoing study of medieval life.

The investigators found rates of cancer about 10 times higher than had been previ...

COVID-19 infections may last longer in young people with weakened immune systems, and that extended period could lead to more mutations in SARS-CoV-2, according to the authors of a new case study.

The study included two children and a young adult who had weakened immune systems due to treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For months, they tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus th...

WEDNESDAY, April 28, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Young Black and Hispanic cancer patients face poorer survival odds than their white counterparts, even from some cancers that are highly curable, a new study finds.

It's well known that the United States has long-standing racial disparities in cancer survival.

The researchers said the new findings bolster evidence tha...

If you live with a smoker, breathing in their smoke could increase your risk of oral cancer by more than 50%, a new analysis shows.

The findings highlight the need for more effective programs to prevent people from being exposed to secondhand smoke, the British authors said.

They analyzed five studies from Asia, Europe, North America and Latin America that included a total of nearly...

If hormones are part of your treatment for breast or prostate cancer, your heart health should be closely monitored, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement.

Hormonal therapies for breast and prostate cancer increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, the authors noted. This increased risk is greater in patients who already have two or more heart risk factors...

A cutting-edge experimental drug cuts nearly in half the risk of death among patients with a rare but aggressive cancer of the eye, new clinical trial data show.

Tebentafusp has now become the first drug shown to improve overall survival in patients with uveal melanoma, said Dr. Antoni Ribas, immediate past president of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), in a

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2021
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  • MONDAY, April 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Most people know obesity can lead to diabetes or heart disease, but excess weight can play a role in cancer, too, researchers say.

    A new study found that breast cancer survivors who are overweight have a statistically significant increased risk of developing a second primary cancer – one not connected to their previous cancer...

    A long-banned pesticide may be having health effects that ripple across generations, a new study suggests.

    At issue is DDT, a once widely used pesticide that was banned in the United States in 1972. That ban, however, was not the end of the story.

    DDT is a persistent organic pollutant, a group of chemicals that are slow to break down and linger in the environment for years. So ...

    Marc Baum went through all the usual steps to treat his bladder cancer -- a couple of surgeries, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, all in a three-month period.

    But doctors hope that an extra step -- an experimental vaccine -- will be what keeps Baum's cancer from coming back.

    A vaccine that uses genetics to teach a person's immune system how to precisely target the cancer has prov...

    TUESDAY, April 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) --The first device that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect possible signs of colon cancer during colonoscopy has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    The GI Genius uses AI-based machine learning to help identify lesions such as polyps or suspected tumors in real time during a colonoscopy, according to the agency.

    Ovarian cancer is a tough diagnosis to cope with, and now a new study finds these patients face a much higher risk of depression and other mental health issues.

    And the emotional anguish exacted a significant toll: The researchers also found it was associated with an increased risk of death during the study period among these women.

    "Mental health issues are important for cancer pat...

    A nutritious diet, regular exercise and other components of a healthy lifestyle may reduce the odds of lethal prostate cancer in men with a high genetic risk for it, researchers report.

    "The excess genetic risk of lethal prostate cancer could be offset by adhering to a healthy lifestyle," concluded co-lead author Anna Plym. She's a postdoctoral research fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospi...

    Women face no increased risk of pelvic cancer -- tumors of the bladder, cervix and ovaries -- if they have surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a new study finds.

    Concerns about possible complications and safety issues related to use of surgical mesh -- particularly for a condition called pelvic organ prolapse, and also for SUI -- have made some patients reluctant to have m...

    At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

    Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the lates...

    A few years ago, Dr. Joseph Shrager, a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine, noticed that lung cancer diagnoses were noticeably higher at age 65 than at slightly older or younger ages.

    "There was no reason rates should differ much between the ages of 63 and 65," Shrager said.

    He discussed this with his colleagues, who said they were seeing so...

    When the pandemic first hit last spring, screening mammograms fell by the wayside as COVID-19 became the most pressing medical concern in the country, but U.S. testing rates rebounded by mid-summer, a new study shows.

    But even though things have returned to normal, it still hasn't been enough to make up for those three months of delays, the researchers noted.

    Investigators from the ...

    Combining stem cell transplants with cutting-edge immunotherapy prevents leukemia relapses in young people and improves their chances of survival, new research suggests.

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common childhood cancer.

    This study included 50 patients (ages: 4 to 30) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who received CAR T-cell therapy. The treatment genetically modifies...

    Heart disease is gaining on cancer as the leading cause of death among American women under 65.

    "Young women in the United States are becoming less healthy, which is now reversing prior improvements seen in heart disease deaths for the gender," said Dr. Erin Michos, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. She's the co-author of a new study that inv...

    Cancer screening rates are beginning to rebound after plummeting during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey finds.

    And patients are being diagnosed with more advanced cancers than before the pandemic, according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

    "The trend toward more advanced disease, while alarming, does not automatically mean worse outcom...

    Obesity may shorten the lives of patients with certain types of cancers, but not others, a new research review concludes.

    The analysis, of more than 200 studies, found that across numerous cancers, obesity was linked to shorter survival. The list included breast, colon, prostate, uterine and pancreatic cancers.

    On the other hand, patients with lung, kidney or melanoma skin cancer al...

    Many people may have postponed cancer screenings during the coronavirus pandemic, but a major medical group says now is the time to catch up.

    The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer is urging people to resume recommended cancer screenings to prevent further delays that could lead to diagnosis after a cancer is more advanced.

    "Regular cancer screening tests can improve...

    U.S. surgery patients have a high rate of smoking, which could be one reason why some wind up on the operating table, researchers say.

    A look at nearly 329,000 Michigan residents who had common surgical procedures between 2012 and 2019 found that nearly a quarter had smoked in the past year. In comparison, just over 14% of U.S. adults smoked in 2019.

    The highest rates of smoking wer...

    Fifteen years of widespread vaccination of U.S. children with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is reaping big rewards: A more than 80% drop in new infections has been seen in women and girls under the age of 25.

    That could mean an equally big drop to come in a host of dangerous conditions that are linked to HPV infection, including cancers of the cervix, anogenital area and mouth/th...

    Women with advanced ovarian cancer often face grim statistics, with less than half surviving for five years after their diagnosis. However, a new study suggests that so-called "maintenance therapy" with a targeted cancer drug may add years to some patients' lives.

    In findings described by some experts as "remarkable," the study showed that women with advanced ovarian cancer linked to the ...

    Whether it's takeout or dining in, lives filled with lots of restaurant fare could turn out to be shorter, new research shows.

    The study found that dining out frequently -- two or more meals prepared away from home each day -- is tied to an increased risk of death from any cause.

    One nutritionist who wasn't involved in the study said the findings come as little surprise.

    "Many...

    Kids born to moms who took a drug widely used to prevent miscarriages in the 1950s and 1960s may be twice as likely to develop cancer in adulthood.

    The drug in question, hydroxyprogesterone caproate, also known as OHPC or 17-OHPC, is a man-made version of the hormone progesterone. It is no longer used to reduce the chances of miscarriage, but it's still prescribed to prevent preterm birth...

    After a sharp drop early in the COVID-19 pandemic, rates of routine breast and colon cancer screening soon returned to near-normal levels, a new study finds.

    "These are the first findings to show that, despite real fears about the consequences of drop-off in cancer screens, health facilities figured out how to pick this back up after the initial pandemic restrictions," said lead study aut...

    Cancer survivors, especially older ones, have an increased risk of heart disease over the next decade, a new study finds.

    Ohio State University researchers analyzed data from more than 15,000 U.S. adults, aged 40 to 79, who were followed from 2007 to 2016. At the start of the study period, 13% reported a history of cancer but none had a history of heart disease.

    Over the next decade...

    An ongoing debate about when and how often women should undergo screening mammograms is intensifying in medical circles.

    A new study and an editorial published online March 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine are adding new fuel to the fight.

    The research suggests many U.S. screening centers are testing women earlier and more often than necessary, and an accompanying editorial war...

    The same lifestyle habits that protect the heart can also curb the risk of a range of cancers, a large new study confirms.

    The study of more than 20,000 U.S. adults found both bad news and good news.

    People with risk factors for heart disease also faced increased odds of developing cancer over the next 15 years. On the other hand, people who followed a heart-healthy lifestyle c...

    Financial worries can hamper the success of cancer treatment and raise patients' risk of death, according to a new study that offers the first evidence of such a link.

    "The association we found was very strong, and very concerning," said senior study author Dr. Anurag Singh, director of radiation research at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo, N.Y. "If you are worried abo...

    You might decide your frizzy locks aren't so bad after all, given a new warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that most hair straightening/smoothing products release formaldehyde gas, a human carcinogen.

    Being exposed to formaldehyde for longer periods of time and at higher concentrations increases the health risks, according to the FDA.

    Formaldehyde exposure can ...

    A cancer diagnosis for your child is devastating enough, but new research shows the coronavirus pandemic has made the battle even harder for many families.

    "Parents and caregivers of children who have cancer are already under tremendous stress," said study author Kyle Walsh, an associate professor in the department of neurosurgery at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "And while the pandemi...

    If you want to protect yourself against dementia, heart disease and cancer, you might want to get your protein from nuts instead of juicy red steaks.

    New research shows that older women who ate the most plant protein were 21% less likely to suffer a dementia-related death and 12% less likely to die from heart disease, compared with women who ate little to no plant protein.

    "Not all ...

    Battling cancer is tough in normal times, but many U.S. cancer survivors are concerned the coronavirus pandemic will interfere with their care and put their health at risk, a new study finds.

    "This study demonstrates the importance of clear communication between health care providers and patients experiencing concerns and uncertainties that may affect mental health during the pandemic as ...

    People with chronic heartburn may face increased risks of several rare types of cancer, a large U.S. government study shows.

    Researchers found that among more than 490,000 Americans aged 50 and up, those with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) had about twice the risk of developing cancers of the esophagus or larynx (also known as the voice box).

    GERD, or acid reflux, occurs whe...

    Worried about what damage the polluted air outside might pose to your health during your work commute? New research suggests you might want to worry more about the chemicals you are exposed to inside your car.

    Benzene and formaldehyde are used in automobile manufacturing, and both are known to cause cancer at or above certain levels of exposure. Benzene also poses a risk of repro...

    Higher levels of a certain type of immune cell may explain why immunotherapy for prostate cancer is more effective in Black men than in white men, researchers say.

    The finding could lead to immunotherapy-based precision treatment for localized aggressive and advanced prostate cancer in all races.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed 1,300 prostate tumor samples and found that, on...

    Most people aren't aware of the signs of gallbladder or bile duct cancer, but the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey says they should be.

    The gallbladder is a small organ connected to the liver by bile ducts. Its job is to store bile, which is made by the liver to aid in digestion of fats.

    When cancer develops in the gallbladder, it usually starts in the innermost layers and gra...

    One side effect of COVID-19 vaccination is creating undue fear among women, causing them to worry that they might have breast cancer.

    Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines can cause lymph nodes to swell, particularly those in the armpit on the side where the shot was received, experts say.

    Some women are feeling these armpit lymph nodes and mistaking them for breast lumps, according ...

    Getting a colonoscopy as soon as possible after an abnormal stool test could reduce your risk of colon cancer and death from the disease, researchers say.

    In a new study, investigators analyzed data from more than 200,000 U.S. veterans, aged 50 to 75, who had an abnormal fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or fecal occult blood test (FOBT).

    Both are common stool blood screening tests. A...

    If you have cancer and you're trying to exercise to boost your health, new research suggests you don't have to knock yourself out during your workout.

    Light exercise is just as beneficial as more demanding workouts for cancer patients, the researchers found.

    Previous research has shown that physical activity can improve cancer patients' physical and mental health, reduce fatigue and...

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