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Health News Results - 162

A cancer diagnosis can deliver a double blow -- along with dealing with a serious health crisis, you also need to worry about how your treatment is going to affect your finances.

Nearly three out of four people with advanced colon cancer that spread to other parts of their bodies experienced major financial hardships within a year of starting treatment, a new study found.

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Fatter wallets lead to fatter people, according to a new study.

Researchers examined the link between nations' wealth and their obesity rates. They discovered citizens get plumper as their country gets richer.

"As most people currently live in low- and middle-income countries with rising incomes, our findings underscore the urgent need for effective policies to break -- or a...

If there's such a thing as a "new normal" during the coronavirus pandemic, it's a constant state of stress.

And it's particularly intense for many parents who are keeping house, working from home, and trying to keep their kids' online learning on track at the same time, according to a new online survey.

Nearly half (46%) of respondents who have kids younger than 18 said ...

Low-income Americans are much less likely to be screened for heart disease or to receive counseling about controlling risk factors, a new study finds.

Heart health screenings -- such as regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks -- and counseling to improve diet, increase exercise or quit smoking play important roles in reducing heart disease risk.

Income has long been as...

COVID-19 has directly claimed tens of thousands of U.S. lives, but conditions stemming from the novel coronavirus -- rampant unemployment, isolation and an uncertain future -- could lead to 75,000 deaths from drug or alcohol abuse and suicide, new research suggests.

Deaths from these causes are known as "deaths of despair." And the COVID-19 pandemic may be accelerating conditions that...

The COVID-19 pandemic has done untold economic damage in the United States, with businesses shuttering and people self-isolating at home to try to slow the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus.

You might think hospitals and health care systems would be immune to this wave of financial ruin, since there's no industry more crucial to America's fight against the pandemic.

<...

Injuries in the United States take a huge toll on the workplace, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed millions of workplace health insurance claims among adults aged 18 to 64 between 2014 and 2015, with a specific focus on non-fatal injuries treated in emergency departments.

The injuries examined in the study included burns, poisonings, gunshot wounds, fal...

As national guidelines on social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic expired Thursday, the White House announced an initiative to produce a COVID-19 vaccine that could be available nationwide by January.

President Donald Trump said it is not too optimistic to try to produce roughly 300 million doses of vaccine in eight months, enough for all Americans, the Washington Post

Poor and minority Americans are most likely to lose access to clean tap water as droughts become more common and severe, a new paper says.

Water service in the United States is delivered by tens of thousands of community systems, most of which are small and funded locally, according to the study.

More than 80% of the 50,000-plus U.S. community water systems delivering wa...

Social distancing guidelines crafted by the federal government to stem the spread of coronavirus expire on Thursday, but President Donald Trump said Wednesday he has no intention of extending the measures.

"They'll be fading out, because now the governors are doing it," Trump explained during a media briefing. More than half of the United States, at least 28 states, will be partially ...

Millions of Americans in industries hard-hit by the coronavirus pandemic could be eligible for financial help with health insurance, a new study says.

Many of the newly unemployed might not know they can get public insurance or subsidies for coverage through the Affordable Care Act's insurance marketplaces, according to an analysis published this month by the Urban Institute, a Wash...

As the U.S. coronavirus case count climbed past 1 million and the death toll neared 60,000, President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday that forces beleaguered meat processing plants to stay open so the country's food supply isn't threatened.

The order used the Defense Production Act to classify meat processing as critical infrastructure, to try to keep chicken, pork ...

Worries over medical bills would prevent 1 in 7 Americans from seeking treatment if they had possible symptoms of COVID-19, a new poll finds.

Of more than 1,000 adults surveyed, 6% -- representing 15 million Americans -- said that during the coronavirus pandemic, they or a family member had been denied care for another health problem.

Asked if they would seek medical att...

While health experts continued to call for a national strategy to test more Americans for coronavirus, President Donald Trump on Monday announced a "blueprint" for boosting testing capacity as some states began reopening their economies.

By Tuesday afternoon, the number of U.S. coronavirus cases passed 1 million while the death toll was almost 56,000, the Post reported.

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Young people who pull themselves out of poverty may be no better off when it comes to their heart health, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that "upwardly mobile" U.S. adults tended to be less stressed and depressed than peers who spent their whole lives below the poverty line. Unfortunately, it did not make a difference in their cardiovascular health.

They were just a...

With states across America beginning to relax stay-at-home orders, White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx reiterated on Sunday that some form of social distancing will still be necessary through the summer.

In an interview on Meet the Press, she stressed that "social distancing will be with us through the summer to really ensure that we protect one ano...

As the number of U.S. coronavirus cases surged past 938,000 on Sunday, several states continued to plow ahead with plans to reopen parts of their economies.

Georgia is moving the fastest to ease social distancing restrictions, while governors in Tennessee, Idaho and Missouri are preparing to execute their reopening plans soon, the Washington Post reported.

On Friday,...

Even as some states prepare to reopen for business, a new study suggests that many of the tests needed to prove that workers might be immune to the new coronavirus are faulty.

As reported Friday in The New York Times, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and UC San Francisco tested 14 of the leading blood antibody tests that look for antibodies proving that a p...

FRIDAY, April 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. House passed a $484 billion deal on Thursday that would replenish a small business loan program that has run out of funding. The bill also directs more money to hospitals and COVID-19 testing.

President Donald Trump is expected to sign the bill into law on Friday, the Washington Post reported. As of Friday, U.S. coronavirus c...

THURSDAY, April 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Lawmakers were poised to pass a $484 billion deal on Thursday that would replenish a small business loan program that has run out of funding and direct more money to hospitals and COVID-19 testing.

The Senate has already passed the measure, and the House is now expected to do the same, the Washington Post reported.

The le...

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- President Donald Trump announced Tuesday that the issuance of all green cards in the United States will be suspended for 60 days as the country battles the coronavirus pandemic.

The halt will not stop temporary workers on nonimmigrant visas from entering the United States, the Washington Post reported.

"I will be issuing...

The coronavirus pandemic has supercharged the financial stress that already plagues many Americans, an expert says.

About half of Americans lived paycheck to paycheck before the pandemic, according to a recent survey from First National Bank of Omaha, and now many have lost their jobs.

"The pervasive financial stress the majority of Americans feel is now on steroids, as most...

Women under age 65 with coronary artery disease are more likely to die if they live in rural areas of the United States, and premature deaths among them have surged, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed nationwide data on premature deaths from coronary artery disease between 1999 and 2017. While premature deaths decreased overall, they remained consistently higher in rural areas --...

TUESDAY, April 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- All immigration to the United States will be stopped to protect Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump announced late Monday night, as the country's COVID-19 death toll topped 42,000.

"In light of the attack from the Invisible Enemy, as well as the need to protect the jobs of our GREAT American Citizens, I will be...

The lifesaving benefits of strict social distancing rules during the coronavirus pandemic far outweigh their projected harm to the U.S. economy, a new report claims.

"Our benefit-cost analysis shows that the extensive social distancing measures being adopted in the U.S. likely do not constitute an overreaction," said lead author Linda Thunstrom, an assistant professor of economics at ...

MONDAY, April 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The White House and Congressional leaders said Sunday they were close to agreement on a $470 billion coronavirus package that would pump more money into a small business loan program that has run out of funding.

Roughly $100 billion in the latest economic stimulus deal would go toward hospital needs and coronavirus testing, the Associated...

As governors across America crafted plans to start easing social distancing amid the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. cases topped 728,000 on Sunday while the death toll neared 35,000.

But new estimates from Harvard University researchers suggest the United States as a whole cannot safely reopen unless health officials triple the number of coronavirus tests that are now being conducted, ...

SATURDAY, April 18, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. cases of coronavirus infection topped 701,000, with almost 33,000 dead from COVID-19 by Saturday -- even as some states debated an easing of stay-at-home restrictions.

Talk of potentially re-opening America came after President Donald Trump announced new federal guidelines on Thursday that governors could use.

The national p...

When the Beatles sang that "money can't buy me love," they were right, researchers say.

"When people base their self-worth on financial success, they experience feelings of pressure and a lack of autonomy, which are associated with negative social outcomes," said researcher Lora Park, an associate professor of psychology at University at Buffalo, in New York.

These feelings...

Despite some improvements, more than half of America's youth still aren't eating right, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on the diets of more than 31,000 children and teens, ageD 2 to 19, who took part in a nationwide health and nutrition survey between 1999 and 2016.

Over the 18-year study period, the percentage of kids with poor diets declined from 77% to 5...

Consumers are happier when they spend money on experiences, instead of more stuff, a pair of new studies finds.

"It would be unfair to compare a shirt to a trip, but when we account for price, we still see this result where experiences are associated with more happiness," said lead author Amit Kumar, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Texas at Austin.

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Families who lose benefits under proposed changes to the U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) would face increased challenges to their health and well-being, according to a new study.

The federal aid program provides health, nutrition and financial benefits to 40 million people.

But the U.S. Department of Agriculture has proposed new rules that would reduce ...

The argument against paid maternity leave in the United States often focuses on the cost, but a new study suggests that more paid leave would not only be beneficial for families, but also for society.

In the study, researchers found that new parents with paid medical leave of 12 weeks or more were more likely to be in better mental and physical shape than those who received less paid ...

Financial struggles are common among young breast cancer patients in the United States, even if they have steady jobs that provide health insurance, new research shows.

The study included 830 women, aged 18 to 39, in California, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2013 and December 2014.

Nearly half (47%) of the women...

As the coronavirus makes its way across America, imagine you are a waitress with no paid sick leave and children at home. Rather than falling ill from a case of COVID-19, your biggest worry is losing pay, or possibly your job. So, if you don't feel well, you still go to work.

Experts say that personal dilemma is also a public dilemma, because it drastically increases the risk of sprea...

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other learning disabilities are more common in families locked into a cycle of poverty, a new U.S. government report suggests.

Nearly 19% of children living in families below the federal poverty level had a diagnosis of ADHD or a learning disability, compared with about 13% of families at or above the poverty level, the new report s...

Chicago's brief and now-defunct soda tax did cut the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, a new study finds, along with raising funds for public health initiatives.

From August to November 2017, when the tax was in effect, the volume of soda sold in Cook County dropped 21% and the tax raised nearly $62 million, nearly $17 million of which went to a county health fund.

Lung diseases have been striking more people around the world in the past 30 years, new research shows.

And being from poor regions is the most important risk factor for respiratory trouble, the scientists added.

Aging and risk factors such as smoking, pollution and overweight/obesity are among the other major risk factors for chronic lung diseases, according to the analysi...

Americans who grew up in the swath of the South known as the Stroke Belt are more likely to develop thinking declines later in life, even if they moved away as adults, a new study suggests.

But people who grew up elsewhere and moved to the Stroke Belt are less likely to succumb to so-called cognitive decline than if they'd lived there all their lives, researchers found.

"A...

There was a steep drop in the number of low-income people without health insurance in so-called Diabetes Belt states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, a new study shows.

The Diabetes Belt is a swath of 644 U.S. counties across 15 southeastern states that have high diabetes rates.

More than 11% of adults in the Diabetes Belt have the condition, compared with 8.5...

Zoos that have large, well-known types of animals attract more visitors, which means more money for conservation, a new study finds.

Zoos and aquariums are among the leading sources of conservation funding and refuges for species with dwindling numbers in the wild.

"Our findings show that charismatic animals in the care of accredited zoos, and the visitors that come to see t...

The Affordable Care Act might have done more than provide more Americans with health insurance: New research suggests accompanying expansions in Medicaid may be linked to higher numbers of low-income people having jobs or going to school.

That's what happened after Michigan expanded its Medicaid under new rules from the Affordable Care Act.

Researchers surveyed more than 3,0...

Before you throw any leftovers away, heed new research that suggests the choice could hit you right in your pocketbook.

It turns out that almost one-third of food in American households goes to waste, costing each household thousands of dollars a year, researchers report.

"Our findings are consistent with previous studies, which have shown that 30% to 40% of the tot...

New research shows that children and teens in U.S. areas with greater levels of poverty face a higher risk of suicide.

"Our findings suggest that community poverty is a serious risk factor for youth suicide, which should help target prevention efforts," said lead study author Dr. Jennifer Hoffmann. She is a pediatric emergency medicine physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's...

Young Americans who live in urban areas or live with low income or low education levels are more likely to die if they get colon cancer, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of disparities in health care," said lead investigator Dr. Ashley Matusz-Fisher, an internist at the Levine Cancer Institute in Charlotte, N.C. "It is important to look at the sociodemographic disparities so that w...

The physical and mental health of poor people is less likely to be at risk in Southern U.S. states that expanded their Medicaid programs under Obamacare, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 15,500 low-income adults in 12 Southern states and found that Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act reduced the risk of declines in health, particularly among tho...

Many American cancer survivors struggle to pay for their medical care and have to cut back on spending, dip into their savings, or change their living situation.

These problems are more common among those under 65 than among older survivors, a new survey reveals.

Researchers focused on 401 cancer survivors, ages 18 to 64, and 562 who were 65 and older.

Among the you...

"Food insecurity" -- not having enough money to afford sufficient food -- increases the risk of premature death, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 510,000 adults in Canada between 2005 and 2017. Over the study period, nearly 25,500 people died prematurely. The average life expectancy in Canada between 2008 and 2014 was 82, so deaths at or b...

Some groups of American teens are more likely than others to view e-cigarettes as a health threat, a new study suggests.

That list includes girls, whites, LGBTQ teens, teens living in the suburbs, and those from more affluent and better-educated families.

Vaping rates among U.S. teens are high. More than 1 in 4 high school students regularly use e-cigarettes, and the number...

How teens see their family's social status may play a part in their mental health and success at school, a new study suggests.

Social status appears to be more important than what their parents do for a living, how much money they have or how educated they are, the researchers said.

"The amount of financial resources children have access to is one of the most reliable pred...