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Results for search "Economic Status".

Health News Results - 150

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- On any given night in America, more than 550,000 people are homeless, and they are being hospitalized in greater numbers, a new study suggests.

Despite expanded Medicaid and increased funds for health care clinics, hospitalizations among this vulnerable population are rising, said lead researcher Dr. Rishi Wadhera. He is with the Smith Cent...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a good economy, the care at U.S. nursing homes falls because it's harder to attract and keep staff, a new study contends.

"During economic downturns, many people are willing to take positions with work environments they may not prefer because there aren't many options," said principal investigator Sean Shenghsiu Huang.

"But when ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers who roll their own cigarettes are less likely to try to kick the habit and cost may be the reason why, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 38,000 adults in England who were smokers or who had quit in the past year. About 56 percent said they smoked only factory-made cigarettes, while nearly 37 percent said t...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With so much emphasis on fresh, farm-to-table foods, it's easy to overlook the value of canned items. These are convenient, often cheaper alternatives to fresh and frozen.

Use these tips to help you choose wisely.

When shopping, look for cans in good shape. Don't buy -- or keep -- cans that are dented, rusted or swollen. Cans have ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulance response times for cardiac arrest are longer in poor U.S. neighborhoods than in rich ones, which means poor patients are more likely to die, a new study finds.

"When it comes to a cardiac arrest, every minute counts," said study author Dr. Renee Hsia, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When wildfires strike, minority communities are especially vulnerable, a new study finds.

"A general perception is that communities most affected by wildfires are affluent people living in rural and suburban communities near forested areas," said study lead author Ian Davies.

"But there are actually millions of people who live in are...

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Paid leave for new mothers may increase breastfeeding rates, but mainly among women with higher incomes, a new study contends.

The United States is the only developed country that does not offer paid leave to new parents on a national level. But four states now offer paid leave, and the study focused on two of the first to do so. California a...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One in six American kids struggles with obesity, and minorities struggle the most, a new report shows.

"Childhood obesity continues to be a major public health challenge, with significant financial and societal implications," said Jamie Bussel. She is senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which conducted the study.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many women living with advanced breast cancer face significant financial strains -- from paying for their care to simply covering monthly bills, a new survey finds.

Researchers found that of the more than 1,000 women they surveyed, nearly 70 percent said they were worried about the financial fallout related to their cancer. Many said they'd...

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The number of women delivering babies via cesarean section has nearly doubled worldwide since 2000, to about 21 percent, new research shows.

That's significantly higher than the 10 percent to 15 percent considered medically necessary, researchers said.

When complications develop, C-sections can save the lives of mothers and their b...

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to money, nice people really are more likely to finish last, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 3 million people and found that those who were nice were at increased risk for bankruptcy and other financial problems.

Why?

They just don't value money as much as other people do, acco...

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty may scar kids' mental abilities for the rest of their lives, a new study suggests.

Children who grow up poor or otherwise disadvantaged are more likely to score lower on tests of thinking, learning, reasoning, remembering and problem-solving in old age, according to researchers.

"Just like the body, the brain ages, but for...

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Can your personality determine how good you are with money?

The answer is yes, according to research by Jacob Hirsh, an assistant professor of organizational behavior and human resource management at the University of Toronto Mississauga's Institute for Management and Innovation.

Introverts often prefer to save money, banking buck...

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- LGBT people in the United States are more likely than their straight counterparts to be poor, and this is especially true for women, a new study says.

Wealth plays a key role in health and well-being, and it's one factor in the poorer health for this group that could be changed, according to the researchers.

Their study included more...

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poor nutrition increases a child's risk of high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed national health survey data for 2007 to 2014 from more than 7,200 U.S. kids between 8 and 17 years of age.

More than one-fifth lacked good access to nutritious foods, and more than 12 percent overall had high blood pressure.

...

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your parents' jobs likely had a strong influence on what you do for a living, according to a study that questions the belief in social mobility in the United States.

"A lot of Americans think the U.S. has more social mobility than other western industrialized countries. This makes it abundantly clear that we have less," said researcher Michae...

MONDAY, Sept. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Homelessness threatens young children's health, even if it occurs while they're still in the womb, a new study shows.

"These findings back up what we already knew about how the stress of homelessness affects children's heath, but this helps us determine which children are at greatest risk, and makes the argument that policymakers and providers...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty is a major reason black and Hispanic children with some types of cancer have lower survival rates than white patients, a new study finds.

Researchers examined U.S. government data on nearly 32,000 black, Hispanic and white children who were diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2011. For several cancers, whites were much more likel...

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teen health in developing countries is vastly underfunded, researchers report.

While teens represent 26 percent of people in developing countries, teen health received just 1.6 percent of global development aid for health between 2003 and 2016, the study found.

And very little of that money was directed to serious teen problems such ...

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to prevent childhood obesity probably should begin at birth to have any hope of success, according to new results from a pair of clinical trials.

First-time moms taught good nutrition strategies during their baby's first year wound up with 3-year-olds who were less likely to be overweight or obese, a Pennsylvania-based clinical trial d...

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Homelessness in infancy poses long-term harms, including greater risk for poor health and development later in childhood, a new study finds.

"We too often refer to 'resiliency' when we talk about children exposed to hardship as infants. We should not mislead ourselves about the very real long-term impacts that are seen," study first author Dr. ...

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Employees struggling with depression take less time off from work if they receive support and help from their managers, a new study suggests.

Many people suffer depression at some point during their working lives. But they often don't disclose their condition or seek help because they're afraid of repercussions, according to the researchers.<...

MONDAY, July 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many older Americans with dementia don't know they have the disease, a new study indicates.

A review of data from 585 Medicare recipients with probable dementia found nearly 6 out of 10 were either undiagnosed or unaware of their diagnosis.

Those who had less than a high school education, who went to medical visits alone and who had ...

MONDAY, July 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of treatment for early stage breast cancer can be devastating for many patients, but they get little guidance or help from their doctors, a new study suggests.

"We have made a lot of progress in breast cancer treatment, which is wonderful. But this study shows we are only part of the way to our goal. We must now turn our efforts to co...

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Money can't buy you love, but it can come between you and your spouse if you don't have open conversations about it.

According to a poll of more than 1,300 Americans, couples who regularly talk about money -- as often as once a week -- are happier in their relationship than those who discuss finances less frequently.

On the other han...

THURSDAY, July 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, heart disease can ruin a poor family financially even if they have health insurance, a new study finds.

One in four low-income families with someone suffering from coronary artery disease had out-of-pocket costs that were far beyond their means, researchers found. And these families were three times more likely than midd...

MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Approval of the drug buprenorphine led to a rise in the number of Medicaid patients getting medication to treat opioid addiction. But the rates were lower among poor, black and Hispanic patients, a new study says.

Methadone or buprenorphine are recommended treatments for opioid-abuse disorders. Methadone must be dispensed in special clinics and...

FRIDAY, June 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. counties with high rates of prescription painkiller use voted heavily in favor of Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, a new study finds.

Researchers found that, on average, Trump got about 60 percent of the vote in counties with the greatest use of prescription opioids -- drugs such as Vicodin and OxyContin. That was in contra...

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with severe mental illness are more than twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes, and the increased risk is highest among minorities, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at more than 15,000 patients with severe mental illness and found that 28 percent had type 2 diabetes. The rate in the general population is 12 percent.

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past two decades, poor, white Americans have become increasingly unhappy, a new report shows.

The same does not appear to be true among their more well-heeled peers, the investigators noted.

The findings stem from two mental health surveys conducted in 1995 and 2014. Collectively, the polls included more than 4,600 non-Hispa...

WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Money matters in motivating heart disease patients to do more exercise, new research suggests.

The study included 105 heart disease patients, average age 60, who used wrist-worn step counters for 24 weeks. The participants were divided into two groups.

One group received personalized step goals, daily feedback and $14 each week ...

MONDAY, June 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many teens and young adults in the United States -- particularly women and girls -- are physically inactive, a new study reveals.

This is a concern, experts say, because exercise is a component of lifelong good health.

Girls, black people and kids from poorer families are least likely to meet exercise guidelines, according to the re...

TUESDAY, June 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eight million people in less-developed countries die needlessly each year, and that loss of life strips $6 trillion from the economies of those nations, new research calculates.

If the rate of preventable deaths continues unchecked, those countries could lose $11 trillion in gross domestic product by 2030, the researchers reported.

"...

MONDAY, May 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease remains a major killer of the homeless, a new review confirms.

A combination of access to care, predicting who's at risk, and challenges of managing care all contribute to the increased odds of dying from cardiovascular disease among this population, researchers reported.

"Clinicians need to make a concerted effort to ov...

THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Where you live can have a major effect on your health, new research suggests.

Living in a diverse community where people are better educated, make more money and have good health care nearby is linked to greater well-being and a better quality of life, the study authors said.

"Our communities have a big impact on our health and wel...

WEDNESDAY, May 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Vaping has been touted as a way to help smokers quit, but new research finds e-cigarettes and free nicotine replacement products barely move the motivation needle.

"As best we know right now, the most effective tool to help all smokers stop is to pay them to do so," said the study's lead author, Dr. Scott Halpern. He's an associate professor...

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Being poor later in life may boost the risk of dementia by 50 percent, new research suggests.

"Our study confirms that the risk of dementia is reduced among well-off older people compared with those who have fewer economic resources," said lead researcher Dorina Cadar.

"Public health strategies for dementia prevention should target...

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's no secret that money worries can lead to health issues, so reducing monthly bills is a great goal. But it's also important to know that some so-called time-saving conveniences can actually cost you more.

For instance, one study found that people who sign up for auto-pay for their electric bills used up to 7 percent more power than they us...

MONDAY, May 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who accept perks from companies that make opioid painkillers are more likely to prescribe the drugs for their patients, new research suggests.

The money in question paid doctors for meals, consulting and speaking fees, and travel expenses.

Typically, doctors receive less than $1,000 per year, said lead investigator Dr. Scott ...

WEDNESDAY, May 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with autism face many challenges, and one of the biggest is finding and keeping a job.

More than two-thirds of adults with autism are unemployed or underemployed, and a new survey identifies some of the most significant barriers -- and benefits -- to work.

People with autism reported that "the most important factors in being ...

TUESDAY, May 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Curious children do better in school, and this is especially true of youngsters from poorer families, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from 6,200 kindergartners across the United States and found that children from poorer families did worse overall on math and reading assessments. But those who were considered curious did as well...

MONDAY, May 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effects of children's exposure to domestic violence costs the U.S. economy about $55 billion a year, a new study reports.

Researchers concluded that by the time children who were exposed to domestic violence reach age 64, the average cost to the nation's economy over their lifetime totals nearly $50,000 per child.

Those c...

WEDNESDAY, April 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans may be trying to eat healthy, but they're throwing away mountains of produce in the process, a new study suggests.

"Higher-quality diets have greater amounts of fruits and vegetables, which are being wasted in greater quantities than other food," said study co-author Meredith Niles, an assistant professor at the University of Ver...

FRIDAY, April 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer U.S. kids are plagued by tooth cavities compared to just a few years ago, but income disparities persist, according to a new U.S. government study.

Researchers found that in 2015-2016, about 43 percent of children ages 2 to 19 had cavities. That was down from 50 percent four years earlier.

This is the good news. On the other h...

THURSDAY, April 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A big boost in cigarette prices could lead to fewer health problems and less poverty for millions of people worldwide, according to a new study.

The researchers from the Global Tobacco Economics Consortium used a computer model to predict how a 50 percent cigarette tax increase would affect health and poverty in 13 middle-income countries w...

TUESDAY, April 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In cities, the chances of being bitten by mosquitoes varies according to neighborhood income -- and middle-class residents may be at greatest risk.

That's the upshot of a study done in Baltimore, where researchers spent two years analyzing DNA from mosquitoes' stomachs. They found that in low-income neighborhoods, rats were the preferred "bl...

FRIDAY, April 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Having a chronic heart condition is stressful enough, but new research suggests the cost of caring for the condition is also a huge financial burden for poorer families in the United States.

One in four low-income families carry a significant financial load from out-of-pocket expenses for chronic heart disease treatment. For one in 10 low-inco...

FRIDAY, April 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Growing up in a disadvantaged neighborhood may mean more visits to the emergency room, a new study suggests.

When children came from areas of "low opportunity," they were about one-third more likely to have been treated at an urgent care center or an emergency room than kids from areas with more opportunity.

They were also twice as l...

MONDAY, April 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who began puberty early are more likely to be overweight, a new study reports.

Specifically, the earlier they had their first period, the more apt women were to have a higher body mass index (BMI), which is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height.

Researchers at Imperial College London analyzed data from hundreds of ...

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medical care costs in the United States can be so overwhelming that Americans fear the cost of treatment more than the illness itself, a new poll shows.

"It's shocking and unacceptable that medical bills strike more fear in the hearts of Americans than serious illness," said Shelley Lyford.

She is president and CEO of West Health...