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17 Jul

Probiotics, Prebiotics and Safety

Are probiotics safe? Not enough data to tell yet

Health News Results - 361

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drowning can be swift and silent, making it a leading cause of accidental death among children.

To help parents protect their kids in and around the water, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its water safety recommendations.

Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental injury-related death among 5- to 19-year-...

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Claire's Stores, Inc., announced a voluntary recall of three of its cosmetic products on Tuesday.

The move follows a warning issued last week by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that said certain Claire's products may contain potentially cancer-causing asbestos.

"Out of an abundance of caution, today Claire's Stores, Inc., a...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often occurs in people with epilepsy. Now, new research provides reassurance that taking ADHD medications won't raise their risk of seizures.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from thousands of epilepsy patients in Sweden. Taking ADHD medications such as Ritalin (methylphenidate), was as...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite years of worry over young doctors' grueling work hours, a new study finds that longer shifts do not jeopardize patients' safety.

The trial is one of two recent efforts to test an assumption about doctors' work hours -- that shorter hospital shifts should mean better-rested physicians and fewer medical errors.

In 2011, new ...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers should avoid certain Claire's cosmetic products that may contain potentially cancer-causing asbestos because the company has refused to recall the items, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

The agency's concern dates back two years, when the FDA first became aware of reports of possible asbestos contamination in ...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dangerous staph infections are declining in America, but they still pose a significant public health threat, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

"Today, we are talking about an infection that's all too common, one of the leading causes of deadly infections in health care and in the community -- staph,"...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Laws that make landlords come clean about bedbugs would stem the spread of the bloodsucking critters and save landlords money in the long run.

So claims a new study in which a University of Pennsylvania team used different sources of data to create a mathematical model to assess the impacts of such disclosure laws.

"These laws are c...

THURSDAY, Feb. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With more Americans walking and fewer drivers paying attention, pedestrian deaths in the United States reached their highest level in almost 30 years during 2018.

A Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report projects 6,227 pedestrian deaths nationwide last year. The projection is based on state data for the first six months of 2018 a...

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many new nurses work long hours, put in overtime and hold down second jobs, all factors that could jeopardize patient safety and their own well-being, a new study suggests.

A number of forces have affected nurses and the hours they work in recent years. They include introduction of the Affordable Care Act and increased access to health care, a...

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- First came confusion, shock and fear, as people struggled to process the emergency warning they'd received.

"There's a missile threat here right now guys. I love you all and I'm scared as [expletive deleted]."

Later came anger, mistrust and denunciation, when they found the frightening warning had been false.

"And now, sh...

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to tighten regulation of over-the-counter sunscreen products.

Included in the proposed rule are updates on sunscreen safety, sun protection factor (SPF) requirements, and the effectiveness of insect repellent/sunscreen combinations.

"The proposed rule that we issued today wo...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They're often called "vampire" treatments, in which people undergo infusions of a young donor's blood plasma to treat everything from aging to Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis.

But these expensive "fountain of youth" therapies are unproven and potentially unsafe, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Tuesday.

"Simply put...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drug makers and federal regulators dropped the ball in tracking the use of a potentially deadly fast-acting form of the synthetic opioid fentanyl, putting thousands of patients at risk of a fatal overdose, a new study claims.

Transmucosal Immediate-Release Fentanyl (TIRF) drugs are approved for use in cancer patients who've developed toleranc...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Glass-fronted gas fireplaces can pose a serious risk to young children, an emergency room physician warns.

Dr. Michael Gittelman, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, cited the case of a 3-year-old boy whose hand was badly burned when he touched the glass door of the family's gas fireplace.

"Young children, like the bo...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The damage wrought by the opioid epidemic has spread to America's highways, with the percentage of fatal car crashes involving a driver who was high on the powerful painkillers tripling in the past 25 years.

Study co-author Dr. Guohua Li said the finding "adds important information for understanding the ripple effects of the opioid epidemic, ...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you have tattoos, it's probably safe to get an MRI scan, European researchers say.

While millions of people with tattoos have MRIs every year without side effects, some adverse reactions have been reported. Researchers said there had been no systematic studies of how safe it is for people with tattoos to have an MRI.

Reported s...

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 4.2 million people worldwide die every year within 30 days of surgery -- more than from HIV, tuberculosis and malaria combined, a new study reports.

The findings show that 7.7 percent of all deaths worldwide occur within a month of surgery, a rate higher than that from any other cause except ischemic heart disease and stroke.

Ab...

THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's bad news and good news in a study of lives lost to suicide around the world.

In sheer numbers, more of the world's people are dying by suicide each year than ever before, the new report reveals. In 2016, about 817,000 deaths worldwide were attributed to suicide, the study showed. That's an increase from the 762,000 suicides calculated...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- How fast emergency medical help arrives at the scene of a car crash plays a significant role in patient survival, a new study finds.

Reviewing U.S. collisions between 2013 and 2015, researchers blamed 14 percent of fatalities in cities and suburbs on slower-than-average EMS response times. Poor timing accounted for 10 percent of deaths in ru...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bouncing around at a trampoline park can be great fun, but a new study warns it can also be an invitation to sprains, strains and broken bones.

Nationwide, more than 100,000 emergency room visits were related to trampoline injuries in 2014, according to the latest data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Injuries that o...

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Using medical scribes in emergency departments is a smart way to increase the number of patients seen by doctors and reduce the time patients spend there, a new study indicates.

Medical scribes do administrative tasks, such as documenting visits while a doctor evaluates the patient, printing out paperwork and arranging tests and appointments...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart surgery patients may fare better if they have their own blood "recycled" and given back to them during the procedure, a preliminary study suggests.

The study focused on so-called "intraoperative autologous" blood donation -- where patients have some blood removed at the start of surgery for their own use. The goal is to avoid transfusi...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of hepatitis C cases and related deaths could be prevented, but it will require a significant investment, researchers say.

In the first study to model such measures worldwide, the authors concluded that sweeping prevention, screening and treatment efforts could prevent 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More U.S. families with young children are buying handguns -- and that might help explain a recent spike in firearm deaths, a new study suggests.

Government figures show that after years of decline, gun-related deaths among U.S. children under age 5 have been on the upswing. Between 2006 and 2016, the rate nearly doubled -- from 0.36 deaths f...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Speeding is a factor in nearly one-third of U.S. traffic deaths, but doesn't get enough attention as a traffic safety issue, a new Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report says.

"If we want to get to zero deaths on our roads, we need to address speeding on a much deeper and more comprehensive level than we have been," GHSA Executiv...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As if the opioid crisis wasn't already bad enough, new research shows a sharp rise in the number of Americans taking dangerous combinations of opioids and sedatives.

These sedatives, known as benzodiazepines, are prescribed for pain, insomnia and anxiety. And another class of similar medications, called Z-drugs, are also being taken with sed...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change is already having clear effects on human health, according to a new review that describes the situation as a "health emergency."

"Climate change is causing injuries, illnesses and deaths now from heat waves, infectious diseases, food and water insecurity, and changes in air quality, among other adverse health outcomes," said ...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having confidential talks with a health care provider is important for teens and young adults, but they rarely get the chance to do so, a new study finds.

"Discussing confidentiality and having private time with a provider are critical components of comprehensive clinical preventive services for young people, however about half of young people...

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tainted food, trash-filled parklands and even hungry kids: Public health could be increasingly at risk as the U.S. government shutdown drags into its 21st day, experts say.

Crucial inspections intended to protect Americans have either been curtailed or are not being performed because the responsible federal workers have been furloughed, said ...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many doctors may worry about giving their hospital patients a flu shot, but a new study suggests they can relax.

"We know rates of inpatient flu vaccination are low, often due to physician concerns that the vaccine could complicate healing or delay hospital discharge," explained study author Sara Tartof, from the Kaiser Permanente Southern C...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With concerns about overfishing, it's shocking to learn that 40 percent of the edible U.S. seafood supply is lost or wasted every year -- and half of that is by consumers.

That's not only money down the drain, but also a loss of valuable nutrients like protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

To cut waste, calculate the amount of fish you rea...

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Flu spreads like wildfire in confined spaces -- and that includes subways, a new British study finds.

The longer your ride and the more stations you encounter during your daily commute, the higher your odds of getting sick, the researchers found.

University of Bristol researcher Lara Gosce and colleagues found fewer cases of flu i...

FRIDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A horrific 2011 Christmas Day fire killed five people, including three young sisters, in their Stamford, Conn., home.

The tragedy -- blamed on improper disposal of fireplace ashes -- is a reminder that fire safety is one of the best Christmas gifts you can give your family.

"Practicing winter holiday safety is extremely important," s...

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking of buying your kid a BB, pellet or paintball gun for Christmas? Don't forget eye protection, the American Academy of Ophthalmology urges.

The number of eye injuries related to so-called "nonpowder guns" are increasing at an alarming rate. In fact, one study published earlier this year found a nearly 170 percent increase in these typ...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People in cars aren't the only ones who benefit from distracted driving laws: Research shows drops in motorcyclist deaths after such legislation is passed.

In the new study, researchers analyzed 2005-2015 data from across the United States and found that motorcyclist death rates in states with moderate to strong bans on drivers' use of cell...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Dangerous infections, blinding ulcers in the eyes: These are just some of the troubles that can come from wearing your contacts for too long.

Contact lenses are generally considered safe, but wearing them while asleep significantly raises the risk of developing serious complications that can cause permanent visual loss, the U.S. Centers fo...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- No one wants to spend the holidays in a hospital bed, but heading home might not be a good idea, new research suggests.

The risk of hospital readmission or death was higher among patients who were discharged over the two-week December holiday period than at other times of the year, Canadian researchers found.

...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Serious sports injuries aren't confined to athletes -- spectators also run that risk, a new study finds.

"You don't expect to be injured when you attend a sporting event as a spectator," said Dr. Amit Momaya, a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "You certainly don't expect to die, yet there are any n...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Between the fresh air and the interesting scenery, running outdoors can be invigorating. But there are safety precautions to take when you leave a protected indoor environment.

The Road Runners Club of America has a wealth of advice.

For starters, take some precautions before you leave home. First, tell loved ones where you'll be runn...

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hands-only CPR training kiosks in public places are an effective way to teach this lifesaving skill, a new study shows.

"These kiosks have the potential to lower barriers to training, increase the likelihood a bystander would perform CPR and positively impact the likelihood of survival from cardiac arrest outside of a hospital," said study au...

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Post a restaurant's "health grade" at the door and you may lower the chances its patrons will get sick with salmonella, a new study claims.

Researchers compared salmonella infection rates in New York City to the rest of New York state before and after the city implemented a letter grading system.

Before the city introduced letter gra...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With holiday travel comes the risk of injury from toting heavy luggage.

In 2017, more than 85,000 people were treated in U.S. emergency rooms, doctors' offices and clinics for injuries related to luggage, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

"Hurting your neck, back, or shoulders can put you out of commission for a l...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of Americans believe the health threat posed by antibiotic resistance is real and pressing, a new survey shows.

The survey of more than 1,000 adults found that 65 percent believe antibiotic resistance is a public health problem, and 81 percent are worried that antibiotic resistance will make more infections difficult to treat or ...

SUNDAY, Nov. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If the last flu season is any indication, you need to take steps now to protect yourself against infection, an infectious diseases expert warns.

The 2017-2018 flu season in the United States was the worst since the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began tracking the severity of annual flu seasons. There were nearly 200 child de...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are wide variations between states when it comes to child restraint rules for ride-share services such as Lyft and Uber, researchers report.

This can cause uncertainty and confusion for parents and other caregivers. Ride-share vehicles typically don't come with a car seat, and an option to request one is available only in some cities, the...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma skin cancer death rates in men are on the rise in most countries, but are stable or declining for women in some, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed World Health Organization data from 33 countries between 1985 and 2015. Melanoma death rates in men were increasing in all but one nation.

In all 33 countries, melanom...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Shootings make the headlines, yet the American public doesn't know that guns take more lives by suicide than by homicide, a new study reveals.

In the United States, suicide is twice as common as murder, and suicide by firearm is more common than homicide by firearm, the researchers reported.

However, the new "research indicates that ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids are safer in states with strict gun laws, a new preliminary study reports.

Researchers found that the stringency of a state's firearm legislation has a direct impact on the number of kids killed by guns.

Twice as many child gun deaths occur in states with the most lenient gun regulation, compared with states where gun laws are s...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you insist on dressing your pet in a costume for Halloween, Fido will thank you for doing so in a safe and comfortable way, veterinarians suggest.

"Make sure costumes are the appropriate size and fit for the pet. A costume that is too tight will be constricting and uncomfortable, and a costume that is too loose may rub and cause skin irrit...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday said that hair dyes can no longer contain lead.

The new rule does not take effect for 12 months, but it ends the only remaining legal use of lead, a neurotoxin, in cosmetic products in the United States.

"In the nearly 40 years since lead acetate was initially approved as a color addi...

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Wellness Library Results - 54

With his 2-year-old upstairs taking a nap, Tim Anderson* seized the chance to do some yard work. A few moments later, he was bewildered to find the toddler lying on the lawn, crying inconsolably. That's odd, he thought: How did he get downstairs so fast? Then, to his horror, he noticed a window screen lying beside his son. Alone in his room, the enterprising tot had managed to push out the screen ...

Do you know the difference between a POS and a PPO? They aren't airport codes or lines on an eye chart -- they're actually types of healthcare plans. Modern healthcare follows its own rules and speaks its own language. With a little preparation, you'll be ready to navigate the healthcare maze and find a plan that's right for you. What are the different kinds of healthcare plans? Here's a rundown...

As a freelance cameraman for domestic and international news outlets for 16 years, David Lee has witnessed disaster on an epic scale. His work has taken him far and wide in search of some of the most vivid images of the last quarter century. In 1986, he landed in Mexico City after one of the country's most devastating earthquakes. Then, during the Los Angeles race riots in 1992 that followed the a...

Carl von Czoernig, a deputy sheriff in a small county in Ohio, started every workday with an involuntary ritual. After showering and shaving, he'd vomit in the toilet. Then he'd grab a fistful of Rolaids (known in law enforcement as "cop candy") to keep his stomach settled during the day ahead. No doubt about it, police officers work a dangerous beat. Every year, close to 60,000 cops are attacked...

Hospitals are supposed to be places of recovery and healing. But they can also be dangerous. A 1999 landmark study sponsored by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) estimated that medical errors in hospitals kill between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans each year. Approximately 7,000 of these deaths are due to errors in medications. The message is clear: Whether you're being treated for a heart attack or a ...

Medicines don't do much good when they never leave the bottle. And yet the American Heart Association estimates that 12 percent of all Americans don't take their medications after getting a prescription. Another 12 percent don't fill their prescriptions in the first place. When patients do try to follow their doctor's instructions, they often miss a dose or take less than their doctors recommend. ...

Medicines don't always work the way they should. Even treatments that have helped you for years can suddenly lose their punch. You may need a slightly higher dose, or you may need a different medication entirely. But first things first: Your doctor is unlikely to change your prescription unless there's a clear sign of a problem. How can you tell if your medicine is working the way it should? It t...

In an ideal world, doctors would always prescribe the right drugs, pharmacists would never mess up orders, and patients would always carefully follow the instructions on their medicine bottles. In the real world, people sometimes make mistakes. And when it comes to medicine, mistakes can be dangerous. According to a 2006 report from the Institute of Medicine, 1.5 million preventable medication er...

How can I tell if my child's too sick for daycare? It's not always easy. Obviously you don't want your kid to pass a phlegmy cough along to all his pals, but it's a much harder call when he has nothing more than a runny nose. In general, you shouldn't bring your child to daycare if the illness is contagious and could do anything more than make any youngster a little cranky. Here are some spe...

In an ideal world, doctors would always prescribe the right drugs, pharmacists would never mess up orders, and patients would always carefully follow the instructions on their medicine bottles. In the real world, people sometimes make mistakes. And when it comes to medicine, mistakes can be dangerous. According to a 2006 report from the Institute of Medicine, 1.5 million preventable medication er...

On a visit to her oncologist, breast cancer patient Vicki Tosher didn't think to ask a key question about bone marrow transplantation: Might she interview other women who had undergone this procedure as a way to better gauge whether it was the right option for her? Thanks to the guardian angel at her side -- Tosher's significant other, who did pose that question as her unofficial patient advocate...

Do I really need to worry about food poisoning? You do if you want to avoid those nasty bouts of cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting. The fact is that most every time you have a "stomach flu" or even a stomachache, food poisoning bacteria are the likely culprits. What's more, you may never know what hit you, since symptoms can take anywhere from several hours to days to appear. Even mild complaints li...

Often called "the silent killer," carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that can be fatal when inhaled. Smoke from fires, backdrafts from blocked chimney flues, grills that use charcoal or chemical fuels, emissions from faulty gas heaters, and the exhaust of motor vehicles, boats, and appliances are all common sources of carbon monoxide. Accidental deaths from carbon monoxide te...

How can I make sure my child's toys are safe? The toys that we treasure in childhood, we remember all our lives. This is one reason to choose your child's toys with care; the other is safety. Consider these guidelines when choosing toys, and share them with anyone who may be buying gifts for your child:

Whether it's a backyard oasis or the gem of the community park, a swimming pool is a great place for summer fun. But it's important to remember that swimming pools can be dangerous, especially for children. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, children ages 1 to 4 are more likely than any other age group to die from accidental drowning. Most of these drownings occur in residential pools, often in ...

If you have toddlers or small children, you may have already poison-proofed your house. If not, the sooner you get started, the better. Children between the ages of 1 and 6 years old are at the highest risk for poisoning because they are mobile, curious, and likely to put almost anything into their mouths. After the introduction of child-safety caps in the 1970s, the number of children's deaths by...

Spend an hour at a playground, and there's a good chance that you'll see a child in tears. As long as kids climb, play tag, and reenact superhero battles, a few bruises and scrapes will be part of the scene. But not all mishaps on the swings, slides, and monkey bars can be fixed with a Band-Aid. According to the National Safety Council, playground injuries send more than 200,000 American children ...

Most cigarette smokers know the dangers of tobacco. After all, the Surgeon General stamps a warning right on the pack. But what about the people sitting next to the smoker? What about his friends and coworkers? His children? Secondhand smoke doesn't come with a warning label. If it did, more smokers might try harder to kick their addiction. According to the best current estimates, secondhand smoke...

Two strangers' eyes meet over the brief flare of a freshly lit match. A jazz chanteuse croons through a haze of smoke. Around midnight, a bartender clears away the islands of empty cocktail glasses and lipstick-smudged cigarette butts left in the revelers' wake. For generations, immortalized in Edward Hopper paintings and Humphrey Bogart movies, inseparable from the sounds of Miles Davis and Sarah...

You never forget how to ride a bike. But if you're like many adults, you might need a refresher course in bike safety. Perhaps you're pulling that ten-speed out of storage for the first time in years. Perhaps a recent wreck or close call has made you suddenly aware of the hazards of the road. Or maybe you're teaching your kid how to ride a bike and suddenly want to set a good example. Whatever you...

How can I protect myself from sports injuries? You faithfully wear your goggles on the racquetball court, you never go in-line skating without your pads and helmet, and you stretch like a fanatic, yet you still get sidelined by injuries. What's going on? Although safety precautions are indispensable, there's more to staying injury-free than avoiding flying projectiles and cushioning your falls. ...

About 1 million people suffer from whiplash injuries each year, usually after being involved in minor fender-benders. Yet for the numerous whiplash cases reported, it can still be difficult for many doctors to diagnose and harder still to pinpoint an effective treatment. Although 90 percent of patients with whiplash injuries get better within a year with little or no treatment, other people appear...

In Truckee, California, 25-year-old Timothy Brooks flew into a rage after another car cut him off on the highway. He followed the offending car to a bagel shop where the driver, 47-year-old Robert Ash, had stopped to eat. After yelling at the older man, Brooks attacked him, stabbing him to death with a knife. Brooks was convicted of second-degree murder. In Little Falls, New Jersey, May Lee and h...

You've heard the adage that "drinking and driving don't mix." But if you've ever been in a bar around closing time, you know that a lot of people haven't gotten the message. A report from researchers at Boston University estimates that Americans take about 820 million drives each year after drinking. Almost 20 percent -- 159 million -- of those drivers are legally drunk when they take the wheel. ...

Medical Specialties Acupuncture An ancient medical practice originating in China that uses the insertion of needles into various parts of the body to restore the body's life energy and balance (called Chi). Disruption of the Chi flow results in pain and/or illness, according to practitioners. Addiction Medicine The diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of substance abuse disorders, including helpi...

When pharmacists are asked to work long hours under grueling pressure, mistakes happen. And although many errors are minor, some of them can be extremely grave. It was Monday, one of the busiest days of the week, and the pharmacy in South Carolina was understaffed. A pharmacist handed a mother a bottle of pills that was supposed to contain Ritalin, a medication to control her 8-year-old daughter's...

Oxygen, light, and water are among the substances that humans need to survive. However, those same life-affirming elements can be destructive if they're present where many people keep their medications, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Take a look in your medicine chest. What's there may trigger a nostalgic swing down memory lane: the cough syrup you used to give your toddler -...

Although you can't control the occasional obnoxious motorist, you can take steps to help protect yourself on the road:

  • Ask that noise levels be monitored at all times to prevent hearing loss. Experts suggest workers wear earmuffs or earplugs to shield their eardrums from high decibels.
  • At a minimum, ask for training in how to set up a safe work zone -- an essential part of the job...

When 51-year-old Bob Lewis worked as a nursing assistant on the teen psychiatric unit at St. Mary's Medical Center in San Francisco for more than two decades, he was pushed, jumped, and pummeled on the back. And that's not the worst of it. Once a girl in a suicidal rage charged him, biting a nipple so hard it tore the skin and bled. As a precautionary measure, doctors gave him a tetanus shot that...

What kind of pacifier should I buy? Find one with a shape your child likes. You may have to experiment a bit before you find something that works. Choose a sturdy one-piece type with a soft nipple and ventilation holes (without them, saliva can collect behind the base, irritating the skin around the mouth and causing a rash). The shield surrounding the nipple should be at least one and a half in...

Why should my child wear a bike helmet? Every year about 350,000 children under the age of 15 are rushed to hospital emergency rooms with injuries from bicycle wrecks -- many of them head injuries that can cause brain damage and life-long disabilities. But these injuries are largely preventable if your child wears a bike helmet, which can reduce the risk by 85 percent, according to the U.S. Cons...

With all the news about contaminated food, is there anything I can do to lower my child's risk? There's good reason to wonder. Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, and other potentially dangerous germs can be transmitted in food, causing illness and sometimes death. Fortunately, a few simple tips on buying, storing, and preparing food can go a long way toward lessening your family's chances of getting ...

Fetid grease traps, backed-up toilets, overloaded sewers -- as a rule, you don't want to get a plumber started on war stories. But Mike Tehle, a Billings, Montana plumber and a 30-year veteran of the business, has a story worth telling. After all, not everyone can describe what it's like to be buried alive. In 1987 Tehle was laying sewer lines in a ditch 30 inches wide and 8 feet deep. After conn...

A five-story building doesn't sound too daunting, does it? Even someone with a major fear of heights could enjoy the view from there. But when Jim Willingham dangled helplessly above the ground, it seemed plenty far enough. Like most window cleaners, he knew an interesting tidbit about physics: A person falling from a five-story building hits the ground just as hard as a person falling from an air...

You can't judge drivers by their age -- just look at teen-agers. They receive more citations and cause far more accidents than people in any other age group. However, that doesn't make every teen a menace behind the wheel, and likewise, many seniors continue to be perfectly safe drivers well into their 80s. At last count, there were more than 30 million licensed drivers 65 or older, according to t...

What special risks do medications pose for seniors? As people grow older, needing a prescription medicine is almost as inevitable as gray hair and reading glasses. Two-thirds of all seniors take at least one medication each day, and 25 percent take three or more. Many seniors owe their lives -- or at least their lifestyles -- to medications, but the remedies can also carry serious risks. As a sen...

How to bottle-feed a baby isn't always clear, especially if you've never handled a bottle before. There's the question of how much should you give a growing infant, what formula to use, and whether he should sit upright when he's eating. Even mothers who breastfeed their babies may sometimes use a breast pump to express milk and feed the baby with a bottle. By feeding your baby correctly from the...

Our homes should be safe havens from the dangers of the world outside, but even the coziest nest can hold hidden perils. Telephone cords, throw rugs, and slick tile can cause falls or injuries. Frayed wires or a worn-out heater can lead to a house or apartment fire. And if you're an older person who has trouble seeing or walking, you may be more vulnerable to such accidents. But you don't have to ...

Anyone can be the victim of a crime, but seniors are often targeted by criminals who see them as easy pickings. That's why you should always be armed -- with the facts. Knowing how to secure your home against intruders and being able to spot telephone scams are the most important weapons in your arsenal. How can I protect myself from burglary? Burglars want to get in and out of a house or apartme...

Why is hypothermia dangerous for seniors? In most parts of the country, a 60-degree day would hardly count as a cold snap. And yet if a senior citizen lives in a poorly insulated house and keeps the heater off to save money, such a day might be chilly enough to cause a hazardous drop in body temperature. As people get older, their bodies become a little less efficient at regulating heat. And if t...

Can prescription drugs be hazardous for senior citizens? Senior citizens need more medications than any other sector of the population, and the drugs can take a toll. By some estimates, one-third of their prescriptions may trigger serious consequences. While some of the risk is unavoidable, you can provide some protection for yourself and loved ones by staying informed. Many thousands of dangerou...

After Neil Hancock died, his family discovered an awful secret. Although Hancock didn't have a cassette player or a VCR, piled in his closets were more than 2,500 cassette tapes, along with hundreds of video cassettes and towering stacks of magazines from more than 100 subscriptions, says his daughter, Pat Raines. For four years before his death at 80, Hancock had been the victim of telemarketing ...

1. Roughly what percentage of childhood poisonings are fatal? a. 50 percent b. 10 percent c. 1 percent d. Far less than 1 percent 2. Which of the following household items is the most harmful if swallowed? a. Liquid dish soap b. Liquid or powdered automatic dishwashing detergent c. Fluoride toothpaste d. Mouthwash 3. Which one of these medicines and supplements fatally poisons the most young c...

How can I prevent fractures? If osteoporosis has started to thin your bones, even a simple fall or twist can have devastating consequences. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 10 million people have osteoporosis, and almost 34 million more have low bone mass, which places them at risk for fractures. Indeed, one out of two women over 50 -- and one out of four men -- will suffer ost...

You don't need to stay inside just because the temperature is plunging. As anyone who has ever strapped on ice skates or hopped on a sled can attest, cold-weather fun is some of the best fun of all. Of course, cold weather also calls for caution. How much do you know about staying safe when it's cold outside? Take this short quiz to find out. 1. Which of these is a common symptom of hypothermia?...

The headline in the paper on that August 2001 morning made me recoil. Another young boy had died in a wilderness boot camp -- a victim, like many before him, of abuse at the hands of those in charge of helping him. Tony Haynes, 14, drowned after employees at an unlicensed boot camp in Arizona, run by a group called America's Buffalo Soldiers, stuck him in a bathtub half-conscious and turned on th...

Aaron Rogers led the Green Bay Packers to the Super Bowl title in 2011, but the road to the championship wasn't easy. The quarterback suffered two concussions during the season, a one-two punched that temporarily clouded his thinking and threatened his season. Rogers had plenty of company: 2010 was the year of the concussion in the NFL. The league reported 154 concussions in the just first half of...

At a time when millions of Americans are making dangerous mistakes with their medications, experts are taking a hard look at the labels on prescription drugs. Are the labels really as clear and informative as they could be? The instructions on labels are often complicated and hard to understand -- if you can read the small type in the first place. But the most baffling items on labels may be the ...

A pill bottle with a skull and crossbones on it sends a universal warning: DANGER. But in plain view in the average home, dozens of items used every day are potentially hazardous. And when young children touch and swallow things that catch their eye -- peppermint pink cleaning fluid or bright red iron pills -- the substances can be fatal. Hundreds of children were dying from poisoning each year ...

Long before scientists learned how to split the atom, our planet has been radioactive. The rocks and dirt all over the globe crackle with small amounts of uranium, a natural ore that constantly releases radiation. As it decays, uranium also produces radon, a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that's all around us. Some places have more uranium -- and radon -- than others. In central Montana, peo...

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