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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

Health News Results - 319

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money worries may contribute to heart disease in black Americans, a new study suggests.

"Stress is known to contribute to disease risk, but the data from our study suggest a possible relationship between financial stress and heart disease that clinicians should be aware of as we research and develop interventions to address social determinan...

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Take a stand for a longer life.

Researchers say even a few extra minutes off the sofa each day can add years to your life span.

"If you have a job or lifestyle that involves a lot of sitting, you can lower your risk of early death by moving more often, for as long as you want and as your ability allows -- whether that means taking a...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Six hours: That's the minimum amount of sleep per night you need to help your heart stay healthy, new research suggests.

The study found that chronic lack of sleep and poor sleep quality raise the odds of fatty plaque accumulation in arteries -- a condition known as atherosclerosis, which increases the odds of heart attack and stroke.

...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A large, new analysis helps confirm that eating lots of grains, vegetables and fruit lowers your risk of dying early from cancer or heart disease.

When compared with those who consume very little fiber, people at the high end of the fiber-eating spectrum saw their risk for dying from heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and/or colon cancer...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Losing a job or taking a big pay cut is hard on more than just your checkbook -- it might drastically increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death.

A new study finds that people who endure large swings in income over the years are much more likely to develop heart disease or suffer a premature death.

"We found t...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After having a stroke, heart attack or cardiac arrest, people are less likely to be employed than their healthy peers, new research shows.

Even if they are working, they may earn significantly less than people who haven't had a stroke or heart event, the investigators found.

Although the majority of people who have one of these seriou...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After indulging in big, rich, holiday meals, cholesterol levels go through the roof, Danish researchers report.

After Christmas, cholesterol levels jumped 20 percent from summer levels among the 25,000 people studied.

Your risk of having high cholesterol becomes six times higher after the Christmas break, the scientists said.

...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that an occasional drink won't harm, and might even help seniors with heart failure.

Heart failure patients who drank in moderation -- a drink a day for women, two for men -- had an average survival that was a year longer than nondrinkers, the researchers found.

"My patients who are newly diagnosed with heart fai...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're thinking about making some health-related resolutions for 2019, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some suggestions.

"This is the perfect time of year for each of us to consider our personal goals, and how we can make positive health choices in the coming year," said AMA President Dr. Barbara McAneny.

"We encourage...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two common classes of type 2 diabetes drugs may lower blood sugar levels, but new research suggests those same drugs might boost the risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

The drug classes in question are sulfonylureas and basal insulin. Sulfonylureas cause the body to release more insulin. They're taken orally and have been used sinc...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's a significant rise in the risk of heart attack and stroke in older people in the months before they're diagnosed with cancer, a new study finds.

"Our data show there is an associated risk of ischemic stroke and heart attack that begins to increase in the five months before the cancer is officially diagnosed, and peaks in the month just...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who call 911 for a possible heart attack may get different treatment from paramedics than men do, a new U.S. study suggests.

Researchers found that ambulance crews were less likely to give recommended treatments, such as aspirin, to women with chest pain. Paramedics were also less likely to turn on their sirens while transporting female ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Whether it's the stress of choosing the right gift, drinking and eating too much, or fighting with relatives about politics, the holidays can be hard on your heart.

In fact, new research from Sweden found the odds of a heart attack jump nearly 40 percent on Christmas Eve.

"Traditional holidays were associated with increased risk of...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Exercising after a heart attack, even a long walk around the neighborhood, can be frightening for survivors. But those fears may be eased by new research that found regular physical activity could help keep them alive.

Many heart attack survivors initially worry that exercise or any type of prolonged activity that increases thei...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women often delay calling for emergency help when heart attack symptoms start, a new study finds.

Researchers in Switzerland found that women suffering a heart attack typically waited 37 minutes longer than men before calling an ambulance. And those delays showed no signs of improving over the 16-year study period.

One reason may be...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living in a neighborhood with lots of greenery just might protect your ticker.

"Our study shows that living in a neighborhood dense with trees, bushes and other green vegetation may be good for the health of your heart and blood vessels," said study author Aruni Bhatnagar, director of the University of Louisville's Diabetes and Obesity Cent...

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While completing a full marathon is a goal for many amateur runners, new research shows a shorter endurance race might put less strain on the heart.

To gauge stress on the heart among 63 amateur runners after they had run either a full marathon, a half marathon or a 10-kilometer race, the researchers assessed levels of certain proteins that ar...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The hearts of women who snore appear to become damaged more quickly than those of men who "saw lumber" at night, a new study suggests.

Evaluating nearly 4,500 British adults who underwent cardiac imaging, researchers also learned that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be vastly underdiagnosed among snorers.

This finding surprised s...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Love your time in the local sauna? Your heart may love it, too.

New research from sauna-loving Finland suggests that for people aged 50 and older, saunas may lower their odds of risk of dying from heart disease.

Specifically, just 5 percent of Finns in the study who spent more than 45 minutes in a sauna each week died of heart dise...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Diabetes, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol are well-known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. But what about just getting sick? Could picking up some type of bug increase your chance of having a stroke or heart attack?

A new study suggests it could.

Researchers have linked infections such as pneumoni...

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An hour or less of weightlifting each week might significantly cut your risk of heart attack or stroke, new research suggests.

Evaluating nearly 12,600 adults over more than a decade, scientists found that small amounts of resistance exercise weekly were linked to between 40 percent and 70 percent fewer cardiovascular events.

But do...

THURSDAY, Nov. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Older heart attack patients who are frail are at increased risk for bleeding when being treated, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 129,000 heart attack patients older than 65 who were treated at 775 U.S. hospitals between early 2015 and late 2016.

Those who were frail had a 50 percent higher risk of major ...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A test that measures wavelengths of light coming off skin cells might detect type 2 diabetes, heart disease and even your risk of dying, new research shows.

It's possible that -- someday -- a quick "autofluorescence" light test to the skin might be used by consumers in "supermarkets, pharmacies or drugstores as a first estimate of [health] ...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity itself raises odds for diabetes and heart disease, even in the absence of conditions like high blood pressure, a new study finds.

"This study is important because we can conclude that it is not solely factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol or lack of exercise that tend to come with obesity that are harmful. The excess fat ...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're bullied by a bad boss or co-worker, your heart may pay the price, new research shows.

Victims of on-the-job bullying or violence faced a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, the researchers found.

The new study of more than 79,000 European workers couldn't prove cause and effect. But if there is a causal link, ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A study that tracked the weight and survival of more than 6,000 Americans for 24 years reinforces the notion that piling on excess pounds can lead to an earlier grave.

Being statistically obese, but not simply overweight, was tied to a 27 percent increase in the odds of dying within the study period, according to a research team from Boston Un...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Heart attacks once characterized as a part of "old man's disease" -- are increasingly occurring in younger people, especially women, according to new research.

The study, presented Sunday at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions meeting in Chicago and published in the AHA journal Circulation, sought to inve...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- With the release of new guidelines for treating and managing cholesterol, there may be questions not only about the changes in the update, but about cholesterol itself.

Most people know that high cholesterol is bad. But there's a bigger picture involved when determining what's considered too high. Put another way, the same number ...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Take the stairs up to your office. Park a little further away from the grocery store. Walk your dog around the block. Carry out the trash.

Any amount of physical activity -- even two minutes' worth -- can add up to huge benefits for your immediate and long-term health, according to the new edition of the U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines for A...

SATURDAY, Nov. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eating more fish or taking a fish oil supplement can reduce your risk of a heart attack, according to a pair of Harvard-led clinical trials.

Heart benefits from omega-3 fatty acids were found both in healthy people and in people with conditions that put them at increased risk of heart attack, stroke or heart disea...

SATURDAY, Nov. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lifelong approach to lowering cholesterol, starting in some kids as young as 2, is the United States' best bet to lower everyone's risk of heart attack and stroke, according to updated guidelines released Saturday by the American Heart Association (AHA).

"Personalized" cholesterol-fighting tactics recommended by...

SUNDAY, Nov. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A simple pop-up alert on a computer screen could help save the brains and hearts of many hospital-bound people with an irregular heartbeat, a new clinical trial reveals.

Rates for heart attack and stroke plunged by close to 90 percent in people helped by the new program, the study found.

The computer alert warns doctors of the high s...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Sudden cardiac arrest -- when the heart stops beating -- is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. To help save lives, automated external defibrillators, which shock the heart back into a regular beat, have been placed in many public places.

Now, these portable AED devices may improve the chance of survival among children ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Heart attacks in pregnant women are rare, but the number is rising, particularly among older expectant mothers, according to a new study that looked at the most common factors behind the increase.

The number of women who had heart attacks during or after pregnancy rose 19 percent from 2005 to 2014, the study found.

"We...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Brushing your teeth twice a day for at least two minutes may lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests.

Previous studies have found a link between heart disease and periodontal disease -- a condition marked by gum infection, gum inflammation and tooth damage.

The new study, scheduled for presentat...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the well-known dangers of smoking, the sizable benefits of quitting may be overlooked, a new study suggests.

"These findings underscore the benefits of quitting smoking within five years, which is a 38 percent lower risk of a heart attack, stroke or other forms of cardiovascular disease," said study author Meredith Duncan, from Vanderb...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies suggest that when people under 40 develop high blood pressure, their risk of early heart disease and stroke go up significantly.

The first study found that in a group of about 5,000 young American adults, having high blood pressure was linked to as much as a 3.5 times higher risk of heart disease and stroke.

The seco...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine-laden energy drinks are popular, but they might make your blood vessels less efficient, a small study suggests.

These drinks -- sold as Monster and Red Bull, to name two -- have been linked to heart, nerve and stomach problems, researchers say.

"A lot of young kids use energy drinks when they exercise, a time when you need ...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying, with new research suggesting it seems to raise the risk for serious heart problems.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

Noise is also assoc...

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than 100 dogs used by U.S. agencies for border patrols, search and rescue, drugs and explosives detection and guarding federal buildings are infected with a parasite that could cause potentially deadly heart problems, according to a new study.

The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, a tropical infection spread by the...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Brisk autumn winds and chilly winter temperatures may make you more vulnerable to heart trouble, a new study suggests.

Researchers found "an increase in heart attacks in low temperature, strong wind, low sunshine duration and low atmospheric pressure," said senior author Dr. David Erlinge, head of cardiology at Lund University in Sweden.

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Gerard Blaney figured his excruciating headache was simply due to a combination of too much stress and too little food. It was budget season at Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia, and as the network's chief financial officer, his entire lunch that day in April 2016 consisted of a single pretzel.

He arrived home that eveni...

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity surgery may help prevent heart attacks and strokes in people who are severely overweight and have diabetes, a new large study suggests.

It's already known that obesity surgery can help people shed pounds and better control health conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure.

But it has not been clear whether that transl...

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Weekday mornings are no longer the most common time for cardiac arrest, as an ever stressful world means hearts are stopping suddenly at all times of the day, new research shows.

"While there are likely several reasons to explain why more cardiac arrests happen outside of previously identified peak times, stress is likely a major factor," said...

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's not a heart attack, but so-called "broken heart syndrome" still puts patients at high risk for hospital readmission and in-hospital death, a new study suggests.

Broken heart syndrome -- also called Takotsubo syndrome -- causes symptoms similar to a heart attack, including chest pain and difficulty breathing.

But while a heart att...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- On her way to watch her beloved Kansas City Chiefs play in 2016, Leah Huss felt sensations far different from the usual pre-game jitters.

There was shortness of breath. And a heaviness in the left side of her chest.

Worse yet, those feelings were awfully familiar.

Seven years after surviving a "widow maker"...

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans' love affair with fast food continues, with 1 in every 3 adults chowing down on the fare on any given day.

That's the finding from a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When asked by researchers, 37 percent of adults said they'd eaten fast food at least once over the past 24 hours.

There was...

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar levels fluctuate, you may have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and premature death than people with more steady readings, new research suggests.

According to the study, during nearly six years of follow-up, men and women whose readings changed the most were 127 percent more likel...

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If the thought of vampire bats sucking your blood for their meals isn't enough to scare you, new research shows they also carry dangerous bacteria that can cause a potentially deadly infection of the heart's inner lining and valves.

Researchers at Montana State University said they found Bartonella infection is common among these ba...

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Wearable defibrillators do not lower the chances of dying from sudden cardiac arrest among high-risk patients who've just had a heart attack, a new investigation concludes.

Worn externally as a vest, these defibrillators are a noninvasive alternative to surgically implanted defibrillators. Both are designed to deliver a corrective electric...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

A heart attack, like any other brush with death, can unleash intense waves of emotion. Many survivors feel scared and nervous, even though they're grateful to be alive. And unfortunately, many also slip into depression. Though feeling bleak may seem like a perfectly natural reaction to heart trouble, depression shouldn't be taken lightly. Left untreated, the condition can sap a heart patient's str...

The irony was as inescapable as the smoke. Here was Taku Ronsman choking on secondhand smoke at work every day in a city health department, where she gave advice on how to create a smoke-free workplace. Hard at work for the Brown County Tobacco-Free Coalition in Green Bay, Wisconsin, she developed chronic bronchitis from the cigarette smoke down the hall. The building -- which also housed the Ame...

We all owe our lives to the arteries that carry oxygen-rich blood from our lungs to our heart. If one of those arteries becomes blocked, part of the heart will begin to die. Doctors call this sudden blockage an "acute myocardial infarction," but it's also known as a heart attack. The pain of the attack itself may last for minutes or hours, but the roots of the problem often stretch back several d...

What is angina pectoris? Angina is temporary pain or discomfort in the chest that occurs when not enough oxygen-carrying blood reaches your heart muscle. (The term "angina" means "pain," while "pectoris" refers to the chest.) Sometimes angina feels like heartburn, the similar sensations you may get after eating a heavy meal. But if you feel this pain regularly, it may be a symptom of heart diseas...

"Driving that train/high on cocaine
Casey Jones, you better watch your speed ...
Come 'round the bend, you know it's the end
The fireman screams and the engine just gleams ..." -- The Grateful Dead Nearly four decades after the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia wrote the lyrics to "Casey Jones," the drug that inspired the song is enjoying a resurgence. More than 35 million Americans 12 y...

It happened so fast. Sharon Brooks, co-owner of the trendy but now-defunct Hamburger Mary's restaurant in San Francisco, was ringing out the cash register and trying to reach her son's girlfriend on the phone. But when the young woman answered, all that came out of Brooks' mouth was gibberish. "I tried to talk and couldn't. I went into the bathroom and felt my left side tingling," says Brooks, wh...

Editor's note: Mike Ashland loved running. But after he moved from the San Francisco Bay Area to Oregon, and began working on a home renovation with his partner, he found himself more and more exhausted. Medical tests revealed that without his knowledge, he had suffered a massive heart attack that destroyed nearly half of his heart muscle. Within a month, Ashland went from being a marathon runner ...

Want to know how to avoid heart trouble? You can start by asking a nurse. Or, better yet, about 84,000 nurses. A 14-year study of 84,129 nurses -- published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2000 -- provides a blueprint for protecting the heart. You don't have to be a medical professional to follow it, either. No matter your age, your gender, or your past lifestyle, now's the time to start...

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