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Health News Results - 156

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Serena Williams and Beyoncé are at the top of their professions. Williams is one of the best tennis players, and arguably athletes, of all time. Beyoncé is a singer who sells out arenas within hours.

But last year, they shared similar stories: Each experienced life-threatening complications in their pregnanci...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Boston pediatrician Dr. April Inniss has read the studies. She has reviewed the reports. She's spoken with colleagues. She has even done her own research.

Yet the information remains shocking to her, flying in the face of her medical training and even, seemingly, common sense: "Black women with a college education or great...

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are black and live in a city, you may be five times more likely to have extremely high blood pressure than the U.S. national average.

That's the conclusion of a study that analyzed the records of more than 3,500 patients with elevated blood pressure treated in the emergency department of Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in New Jersey, ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- For the nearly 800,000 people who experience a stroke each year in the United States, the aftereffects are likely to be life-changing.

Often, it's the long-term physical complications that get the most attention, problems ranging from temporary weakness or permanent paralysis to difficulty swallowing, talking or thinking.

...

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many inmates in U.S. state prisons who want to quit smoking have nowhere to turn for help, a new study finds.

That increases their risk of smoking-related diseases, including cancer, heart disease and stroke.

And the risk is especially high for black men, who are six times more likely to be imprisoned than non-Hispanic white men. The...

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke risk factors are on the rise among Native Americans, a new study reveals.

Previous research has shown that Native Americans have a higher rate of stroke than other racial groups in the United States.

"It was alarming to find a significant increase in modifiable risk factors, like smoking and high blood pressure," said study ...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases black Americans' risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study warns.

PAD -- a narrowing of arteries that provide blood to the arms, legs, brain and other organs such as the kidneys -- can lead to stroke, kidney failure, erectile dysfunction, pain in the legs when walking and loss of limbs.

Black Americans a...

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black women at risk of breast cancer may face a disadvantage because of racial disparities in health care, a small new study suggests.

Ohio State University researchers interviewed 30 white and 20 black women at high risk for breast cancer due to family history and other factors.

The investigators found that black women were less lik...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money worries may contribute to heart disease in black Americans, a new study suggests.

"Stress is known to contribute to disease risk, but the data from our study suggest a possible relationship between financial stress and heart disease that clinicians should be aware of as we research and develop interventions to address social determinan...

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans who receive a liver transplant to treat liver cancer may survive much longer if the new organ comes from a black donor, a new study suggests.

"Our data are intriguing. But our results require validation," said study author Dr. T. Clark Gamblin, chief of surgical oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

...

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 4,000 women in the United States die from cervical cancer each year -- even though there's a preventive vaccine and screening to catch the disease early.

"When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable," said Dr. Sarah Ramirez, a family medicine physician with Penn State Health. "So it's important to make sure you are being...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- For women who use in vitro fertilization to get pregnant, particularly those who find success with frozen embryo transfers, recent studies have found they have an increased risk of preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication and serious blood pressure condition.

Now, academic researchers may have uncovered why.

"Many have r...

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- As in most things, family matters. Specifically, your family's ethnicity could make a difference, at least when it comes to cholesterol and your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

In a recent update of cholesterol guidelines, a national panel of scientists and health experts stressed a more personalized approach to risk asse...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Every day they help feed, bathe and care for the frailest Americans. But female health care workers in the United States often get shortchanged on wages and health insurance, a new study finds.

In fact, about one-third of female health care workers made less than $15 an hour, and that number rose to half when these workers were black or His...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- Older black adults with high blood pressure, and especially black men, show more severe cognitive declines than white adults who have high blood pressure, according to new research.

The University of Michigan-led study published Wednesday in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension, suggests blood pressure ma...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's disease may be twice as common in black Americans as in whites, and scientists don't really know why.

But new research uncovers a clue that suggests that diagnosing the brain-robbing disease may not be the same for these two populations.

The study found that black people typically have lower levels of the brain protein tau...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A sizable study still can't explain why black Americans are much more likely than whites to suffer sudden cardiac death.

"At the end of the day, we just don't have a full understanding of why patients who are black are more likely to succumb to [sudden cardiac death] -- a clear problem and knowledge gap on many levels," said study lead aut...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Barbershops in the African-American community could help men reduce and control their blood pressure, according to a new study.

The research showed long-term reductions in blood pressure among customers who met periodically with pharmacists at 52 Los Angeles County barbershops. Published Dec. 17 in the American Heart Association j...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to metals and pesticides at work could increase risk of heart disease, researchers say.

Hispanic workers in the United States may be especially vulnerable because of language barriers and lower levels of education, the study authors noted.

"Exposure to metals and pesticides is common worldwide, and this study highlights t...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Black adults with high blood pressure that defies standard prescription treatments might want to get screened for sleep apnea, new research suggests.

Moderate or severe sleep apnea -- in which a person can experience pauses in breathing five to 30 times an hour or more -- was associated with more than twice the odds of having res...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Jasmine Johnson has become reacquainted with the South Dallas neighborhood where she grew up. Much is familiar, but she's noticed there aren't many places that sell fresh food.

The 29-year-old filmmaker is determined to bring attention to the issue for a community riddled with diabetes, high blood pressure and other chronic disease...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even with the same treatment, black women with the most common form of breast cancer experience higher recurrence and death rates than white women, a new trial reveals.

The finding pokes holes in the prevailing notion that black women with breast cancer fare worse due to less access to quality medical care, experts said. While that factor may...

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulance response times for cardiac arrest are longer in poor U.S. neighborhoods than in rich ones, which means poor patients are more likely to die, a new study finds.

"When it comes to a cardiac arrest, every minute counts," said study author Dr. Renee Hsia, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who lose a family member or friend to murder have an increased risk of suicide, and black teens are most likely to face this kind of heartbreak, a new study finds.

University of Pittsburgh researchers analyzed the results of a 2014 survey of just over 1,600 teens, aged 14 to 19, in Allegheny County and found that 13 percent said a frien...

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The wait for a heart transplant varies widely based on factors such as availability of donor hearts and blood type, but little is known about differences in wait times based on race and ethnicity.

Now, preliminary research suggests African-American patients may experience longer wait times than other racial and ethnic groups.

...

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Heart attacks in pregnant women are rare, but the number is rising, particularly among older expectant mothers, according to a new study that looked at the most common factors behind the increase.

The number of women who had heart attacks during or after pregnancy rose 19 percent from 2005 to 2014, the study found.

"We...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When wildfires strike, minority communities are especially vulnerable, a new study finds.

"A general perception is that communities most affected by wildfires are affluent people living in rural and suburban communities near forested areas," said study lead author Ian Davies.

"But there are actually millions of people who live in are...

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- New research seems to suggest that living in the United States might make Hispanic men more prone to obesity.

To arrive at that conclusion, researchers analyzed responses from more than 1,000 men who took part in a 2002-2003 survey.

The results showed that Hispanic men who are born or live in the United States for more than five yea...

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The same type of bacteria that causes stomach cancer may also increase colon cancer risk, especially in black Americans, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 4,000 colon or rectal cancer cases in the United States. They found a significant association between rates of these cancers and infection with a virulent strain o...

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A program to teach Hispanic stroke patients skills to lower their blood pressure and reduce their risk of another stroke was a big success, according to a new study.

The study included 552 white, black and Hispanic stroke patients from four New York City hospitals. All were randomly assigned either to a control group that received usual disc...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black women have the highest risk of life-threatening birth complications in the United States, a new study finds.

Compared to whites, black women had a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, the University of Michigan researchers reported.

"Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related emergency ...

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For black Americans striving for lower blood pressure, churches may provide the answer to their prayers.

"African-Americans have a significantly greater burden of hypertension and heart disease, and our findings prove that people with uncontrolled hypertension can, indeed, better manage their blood pressure through programs administered in pla...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Getting too little or too much sleep can affect stroke risk, depending on a man's race, researchers say.

"These results suggest that short and long sleep duration may have different consequences for people depending on race and sex," said study author Virginia Howard, from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Short sleep was de...

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans are at greater risk of high blood pressure than whites, and a new study suggests the "Southern" diet bears much of the blame.

Experts have long known that blacks are more likely to die of heart disease and stroke than whites -- and that rates of high blood pressure explain a lot of that disparity. But why are blacks more likely...

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Minority medical residents routinely face bias and comments that can subtly reveal racial, ethnic or religious slights or preconceptions, a new study suggests.

In the United States, black, Hispanic and Native Americans make up one-third of the population but only 9 percent of practicing doctors.

For the new study, researchers led ...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, can be very difficult to control in some people.

But the skin condition, which leads to dry, itchy and inflamed skin, is particularly problematic for black people, according to new research.

Scientists who examined patients' skin on a molecular level found that compared to Americans of European ances...

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A sudden, severe surge in blood pressure is known as a hypertensive crisis, and new research suggests that black people are far more likely to experience this potentially deadly condition.

High blood pressure "is an unnecessary scourge on African Americans. The prevalence of hypertensive crisis is five times higher in African Americans than i...

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea is common -- but rarely diagnosed -- among black Americans, researchers say.

The new study included 852 black men and women, average age 63, in Jackson, Miss., who were participants in the Jackson Heart Sleep Study.

The investigators found that 24 percent of the study participants had moderate or severe sleep apnea, but o...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty is a major reason black and Hispanic children with some types of cancer have lower survival rates than white patients, a new study finds.

Researchers examined U.S. government data on nearly 32,000 black, Hispanic and white children who were diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2011. For several cancers, whites were much more likel...

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Donald Trump's America might be harming the mental health of teens, especially minority teens, a new study suggests.

Fear of discrimination became more common among Los Angeles-area teenagers between the 2016 election and the months following Trump's presidential inauguration in 2017, researchers found.

Trump's proposed U.S.-Mexico b...

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teen health in developing countries is vastly underfunded, researchers report.

While teens represent 26 percent of people in developing countries, teen health received just 1.6 percent of global development aid for health between 2003 and 2016, the study found.

And very little of that money was directed to serious teen problems such ...

MONDAY, July 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many older Americans with dementia don't know they have the disease, a new study indicates.

A review of data from 585 Medicare recipients with probable dementia found nearly 6 out of 10 were either undiagnosed or unaware of their diagnosis.

Those who had less than a high school education, who went to medical visits alone and who had ...

MONDAY, July 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black men in the United States have higher rates of aggressive prostate cancer than other males. Now, a $26.5 million study is underway to figure out why.

The U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Prostate Cancer Foundation have launched the study to investigate social, environmental and genetic factors behind this disparity.

"N...

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Great Recession continues to take a grim toll: Since 2009, a growing number of Americans have died from liver disease and liver cancer.

The increase among 25- to 34-year-olds is especially troubling because the deaths are due to cirrhosis, a disease caused by excessive drinking, the authors of a new study said. The researchers suspect t...

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A startling 75 percent of black people in the United States develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, a new study finds.

That's a far higher rate than seen among either white men (55 percent) or white women (40 percent), the researchers said.

"We started to see differences between blacks and whites by age 30," said lead resear...

MONDAY, July 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients who survive cardiac arrest during a U.S. hospital stay have poorer long-term survival odds than their white peers, new research suggests.

The study included data from patients aged 65 and older who survived at least until they were discharged from the hospital. The investigators found that, compared with white people, black peo...

MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Approval of the drug buprenorphine led to a rise in the number of Medicaid patients getting medication to treat opioid addiction. But the rates were lower among poor, black and Hispanic patients, a new study says.

Methadone or buprenorphine are recommended treatments for opioid-abuse disorders. Methadone must be dispensed in special clinics and...

MONDAY, June 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Skin conditions are significantly impacted by your skin color, a dermatologist says.

"Ethnicity and skin tone can make a big difference in terms of diagnosis and treatment options with a number of different skin conditions," said Dr. Amy McMichael, chair of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C.

The ...

FRIDAY, June 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Police killings of unarmed black Americans harm the mental health of black adults nationwide, researchers report.

"Our study demonstrates for the first time that police killings of unarmed black Americans can have corrosive effects on mental health in the black American community," said co-lead author Dr. Atheendar Venkataramani. He's a health...

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with severe mental illness are more than twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes, and the increased risk is highest among minorities, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at more than 15,000 patients with severe mental illness and found that 28 percent had type 2 diabetes. The rate in the general population is 12 percent.

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Wellness Library Results - 1

It takes light skin and thin lips to be a good bank teller -- at least according to a former personnel officer at the First Alabama Bank in Mobile. The officer's notes, jotted down during interviews, say it all: One prospective teller was described as "an attractive white female, blond hair, blue eyes, teller-type appearance." Another: "very large lips and hips, overweight, dark skin, black girl, ...

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