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Health News Results - 416

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain's blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer's-related proteins amyloid and tau were present.

...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Staying active in old age may help preserve your memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

In fact, older people who were physically active kept their minds sharp, even if their brains showed signs of lesions or other markers linked to Alzheimer's disease or other dementias, researchers found.

"Physical activity may provi...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Not every budding musician will become a rock star, but studying music has brain bonuses for kids, even those who don't take up an instrument until their teen years.

There's no doubt that participation in in-school music programs boosts motivation. Mastering an instrument or performing with a group brings a sense of accomplishment and is a ...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking just a couple of joints may cause significant changes in a teenager's brain structure, a new study has found.

Brain scans show that some adolescents who've tried marijuana just a couple of times exhibit significant increases in the volume of their gray matter.

These changes were associated with increased risk of anxiety, and ...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Obese people tend to show shrinkage in their brain tissue by middle age -- especially if the extra pounds are concentrated in the belly, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 9,600 U.K. adults, found that those who were obese typically had a lower volume of gray matter in the brain than their normal-weight counterparts. Gray matter c...

TUESDAY, Jan. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being in tune with the present moment -- called mindfulness -- can relieve stress and make you an actor rather than a reactor, a wellness expert says.

Focusing on what's happening right now allows people to notice things they might otherwise miss, said Dr. Timothy Riley. He is an assistant professor in the family and community medicine depart...

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who are often bullied may be left with shrinkage in key parts of their brain, increasing their risk for mental illness, European researchers report.

They said such shrinkage eventually appears to create a growing sense of anxiety, even after taking into account the possible onset of other mental health concerns, such as stress and/or d...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You've probably seen movies where a veteran returns home from the horrors of war and wakes in the middle of the night yelling, punching or flailing so much that they harm themselves or a sleep partner.

This isn't just Hollywood drama. New research has identified who's most at risk for this troubling sleep condition.

It's called ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Walking and other types of moderate exercise may help turn back the clock for older adults who are losing their mental sharpness, a new clinical trial finds.

The study focused on older adults who had milder problems with memory and thinking skills. The researchers found that six months of moderate exercise -- walking or pedaling a stationary...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Jen Godfrey couldn't shake the "deep cloud" that lingered even after she found an antidepressant she could tolerate.

Then a string of stressors hit -- five years of fertility treatment and an 80-pound weight gain during pregnancy that left her with persistent pain; a close relative's suicide; another who went missing; and her own divorce. I...

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've identified genetic mutations linked with a blood vessel defect that can lead to deadly brain bleeds in babies.

A rare hereditary condition, called vein of Galen malformation, causes high-pressured blood to be pumped from arteries into veins. The veins aren't meant to handle such pressure and can rupture, spilling blood...

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Major heart surgery does not cause significant memory decline in older patients, a new study finds.

Researchers found no greater risk for loss of brain function among patients who had heart surgery compared to those who had a much less invasive procedure called cardiac catheterization.

"We expected to find a bigger difference in th...

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes has been tied to a number of complications such as kidney disease, but new research has found that older people with type 2 diabetes can also have more difficulties with thinking and memory.

During a five-year study, participants with diabetes showed a decline in verbal memory and fluency. Using MRI scans, researchers saw that the pa...

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A brain protein linked to Alzheimer's disease might potentially be transmitted to people during neurological procedures, a new preliminary study suggests.

Genetically engineered lab mice developed amyloid-beta deposits in their brains after they were injected with amyloid-laced samples of human growth hormone taken from decades-old human cad...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down -- but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the "use it or lose it" theory on brain health. The concept holds that mentally engaging activities -- from reading to crosswords to board game...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's a college tradition to pull "all-nighters" during final exams. But students may get better grades if they simply go to bed early, two new studies suggest.

Researchers found that students who met an "8-hour sleep challenge" during finals week did better on their exams than those who slept less.

The results prove that the college ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electrical stimulation of a certain part of the brain may offer a new option for "treatment-resistant" depression, a small new study suggests.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, found that 25 patients with moderate-to-severe depression gained significant improvement in their mood after electrical stimulation of a brain...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Connections between different areas of the brain are sustained longer than usual in people with autism, perhaps explaining some of their symptoms, a new study suggests.

It's possible these prolonged connections make it difficult for the brain to switch from one activity to another, the researchers said.

"People with autism do not l...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's more evidence that football may be changing the brains of adolescent players, and not in a good way.

In a new study, researchers looked at MRI scans of 26 football-playing boys averaging 12 years of age.

Comparing MRIs taken just before the football season and then three months after, the scans revealed that the boys had c...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for Parkinson's disease seems to work by rewiring key areas of the brain, a new study finds.

The researchers focused on 15 Parkinson's patients who, in an earlier trial, had received so-called GAD gene therapy. GAD is an enzyme that spurs the production of a brain chemical involved in movement control.

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- High-impact hits may affect the brain development of children and teens after just one season of football, preliminary research suggests.

The study compared functional MRI scans taken pre- and post-season. The researchers saw more gray matter volume in those who had high-impact hits -- but no concussions -- over the season.

More g...

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Don't be surprised at holiday parties if you can remember someone's name but not their face.

Despite what many believe, people are better at remembering names than faces, researchers found.

In a series of tests, volunteers were able to recall up to 83 percent of names but only 64 percent of faces.

"Our study suggests that, ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When a child with autism can play the piano or sing a song, their brains may benefit, new research suggests.

Music therapy increased connectivity in key brain networks, according to the researchers. Not only that, the sessions improved social communication skills and quality of life for the patient's family.

"The universal appeal of ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- How quickly children pick up language skills may help predict their IQ in middle age, a new Danish study suggests.

The researchers found a significant association between IQ test results at age 50 and the speed at which participants achieved a number of developmental milestones in childhood.

"Most studie...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When your mom told you to eat your veggies and drink your orange juice, she was on to something: They may help preserve your brain health, new research suggests.

A 20-year study of men who were health professionals tied a diet rich in leafy greens, orange and red vegetables, berries and orange juice to reduced risk of memory loss (or "cogni...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Head-size measurements can help screen for long-term IQ problems in very premature or very low birth weight babies, researchers say.

"Measuring head circumference and thus head growth in early childhood is a proxy measure of brain volume growth in early childhood," said study senior author Dieter Wolke, of the University of Warwick in Engla...

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effects of head injuries in football players begin at a young age, a new study finds.

Researchers tested college football players' blood for concussion markers and found that they had elevated levels of these markers before the season even started.

"It was quite shocking to learn that the biomarkers were high before th...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who have experienced either a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury are twice as likely to commit suicide than others, a new review suggests.

The analysis also indicates that men and women who have had a concussion are also more likely to consider or attempt suicide.

The investigators stressed that the absolute risk of s...

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cocaine is often cut with the anti-worming drug levamisole -- and the combination is linked to brain damage, Swiss researchers report.

"We can assume from our findings that it is not just cocaine that changes the brain, but that the adulterant levamisole has an additional harmful effect," said research leader Boris Quednow, from the Universit...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying, with new research suggesting it seems to raise the risk for serious heart problems.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

Noise is also assoc...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics is strengthening its recommendation to ban spanking and other forms of corporal punishment, citing new research that says that type of discipline can affect normal brain development.

Harsh verbal punishment, such as shaming or humiliation, is also a threat to children, the AAP says in an updated policy stateme...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who stop smoking pot can think and learn better afterward, even if they are only light users, a new study reports.

Compared to teenagers and young adults who continued using marijuana, those who abstained for a month displayed a "modest but reliable improvement in their ability to learn," said lead researcher Randi Schuster.

"...

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Naps have been shown to help young children learn, but researchers report they may have the opposite effect on children with Down syndrome.

"In children with Down syndrome, there's something about having a nap right after learning that seemed to keep them from retaining information as well, which is totally different than what happened in typi...

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor -- the first woman on the high court -- has dementia, "probably Alzheimer's disease," she announced Tuesday.

Doctors diagnosed her with the beginning stages of dementia "some time ago," O'Connor, 88, said in a letter addressed to "friends and fellow Americans."

O'Connor wrote: "...

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Crowdfunding pleas for dubious or potentially unsafe medical treatments are increasingly common, and raised nearly $7 million on social media in two years, researchers report.

An ill patient pleading for naturopathic cancer treatments or hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be hard to resist. Ditto a parent seeking antibiotics for their child for ch...

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- A child's blood pressure could indicate cognition problems into adulthood, according to a new study suggesting the cardiovascular connection to cognitive decline could begin much earlier in life than previously believed.

The findings may provide a window into the roots of dementia, for which high blood pressure is considered a ...

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's growing evidence that the herpes virus responsible for cold sores also may cause Alzheimer's disease, a new research paper contends.

It's been long known that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) can been found in the brains of elderly people with Alzheimer's disease, and research has shown that herpes increases Alzheimer's risk in people gen...

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many dogs perk up at certain words, like "treat" or "squirrel." But does Buddy really understand what you're saying, or is he simply reacting to the excitement in your voice?

Researchers at Emory University in Atlanta might have some answers. In a study of 12 dogs, the investigators say they've dug up some new details about how pooches proces...

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A behavioral therapist could be as important as a calorie-cutting diet for folks who want to lose weight, researchers say.

Brain scans reveal that people who are better at losing weight have more activity in regions of the brain associated with self-control, a small new study reports.

Teaching people to trigger their brain's self-c...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure during pregnancy can be a sign of preeclampsia -- a potentially life-threatening complication. Now, new research suggests preeclampsia might also make women more vulnerable to a specific type of dementia.

Women with a history of preeclampsia were 3.4 times more likely to suffer from vascular dementia later in life, the r...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A precision map of a part of the brain of the lowly mouse could be a potent new research tool against Alzheimer's, researchers say.

The highly detailed look at the mouse hippocampus should provide new insight into a range of brain diseases in humans, according to the research team from the University of Southern California.

That's...

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You won't jump for joy when you're told you need hearing aids or cataract surgery. But get this: Both appear to slow mental decline in older adults.

That's what researchers concluded after studying more than 2,000 people in England who had cataract surgery and more than 2,000 Americans given hearing aids.

"These studies underline ...

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young football players who suffer repeated head blows -- but not concussions -- may not sustain brain damage, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers followed 112 football players, aged 9 to 18, during the 2016 season.

"We expected repetitive impacts to correlate with worsening neurocognitive [brain] function, but we found...

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A year after a concussion, up to one-third of kids still have symptoms such as headache and irritability that may affect school performance, a new study finds.

"Children with all types of injuries may show post-concussion symptoms," said lead researcher Linda Ewing-Cobbs, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Cent...

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Next time you struggle to put a name to a face, go easy on yourself.

You probably recognize thousands of people.

Participants in a British study recognized 1,000 to 10,000 faces, with the average number being an astonishing 5,000. The faces included people they knew from their personal lives, as well as famous people.

"...

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People with fibromyalgia have widespread inflammation in their brains, new research reveals.

"Finding an objective neurochemical change in the brains of people who are used to being told that their problems are imaginary is pretty important," explained senior study author Marco Loggia. He is associate director of the Center for Integrative P...

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty may scar kids' mental abilities for the rest of their lives, a new study suggests.

Children who grow up poor or otherwise disadvantaged are more likely to score lower on tests of thinking, learning, reasoning, remembering and problem-solving in old age, according to researchers.

"Just like the body, the brain ages, but for...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding premature babies could boost their brain development, new research suggests.

Preemies are at risk for long-term problems with thinking and learning. Pre-term birth is believed to affect the brain's white matter, which helps brain cells communicate with each other.

This new, small study found better brain-cell conne...

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise might delay a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that 2.5 hours of walking or other physical activity a week thwarted mental decline tied to autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD). This is an inherited form of disease that leads to dementia at an early age.

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A paraplegic man has regained the ability to move his legs and walk with assistance, thanks to an implanted electrode stimulating his spinal cord, Mayo Clinic researchers say.

Surgeons implanted the electrode below the level of 29-year-old Jered Chinnock's spinal cord injury. A 2013 snowmobile crash left Chinnock with complete loss of motor c...

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Wellness Library Results - 15

For 20 years, Robyn Yale has been on a mission to raise awareness that people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease can still lead rich, active lives. A licensed clinical social worker who practices in the San Francisco Bay Area, Yale says that the early stage of the disease is different from what happens in middle and later stages. People in the early stages are healthy, high functioning, and in m...

Most caregivers will do practically anything for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease. They'll give baths, help to dress the person, cut up food into manageable bites, and patiently answer the same question 20 times in a row. But when a patient starts wetting or soiling himself, even the most dedicated caregivers can feel defeated. It's hard to face the prospect of constantly cleaning urine stain...

You may feel unsettled when your mother botches her favorite recipe. Then again, who hasn't confused tablespoons with teaspoons a few times? But as the months go on, she starts forgetting to turn off burners. She puts salt in her coffee rather than sugar. And one day, she no longer remembers to eat. When Alzheimer's disease begins taking over the brain, even the most basic instincts aren't safe. ...

People with Alzheimer's disease often act as if their minds are caught in an endless tape loop. They may ask the same question 20 times in an afternoon, pace a stretch of floor for hours, or hum a tune that never seems to run out of verses. Many have a condition called echolalia, in which the patient repeats words endlessly or echoes a phrase. If you're caring for someone with the disease, this so...

Before your loved one developed Alzheimer's disease, the two of you used to talk about anything and everything. But what do you say now that he can't remember your name? The right words can be hard to find, but they're more important than ever. Simple, reassuring messages can give your loved one comfort and guidance -- the two things Alzheimer's patients most desperately need. Staying positive ...

Your father puts on his pants one leg at a time, just as he has done since childhood. But today, there's something different. Your father has Alzheimer's disease, and this morning, unlike every other morning for the last 70 years, he's pulling on his pants on top of his pajamas. For Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers, the seemingly simple act of getting dressed can turn into a minefield of...

In this high-tech, high-pressure age, multitasking has become a national pastime. No matter where we are or what we're doing, we can always add one more ball to the juggling act. Many people regularly check emails on their Blackberry while talking on the cell phone, pausing only to yell at other drivers. "Because of all of the new electronic gadgets like cell phones, Palm Pilots, and other person...

What is Parkinson's disease? We all lose brain cells as we age -- and most of them aren't really missed. But when the wrong cells stop doing their job, a person can become seriously ill. Certain nerve cells, for example, have the vital job of producing dopamine, a compound that relays messages between parts of the brain that tells muscles how to move smoothly. People develop Parkinson's disease ...

Have you ever asked for a "whatchamacallit" when you really needed a hammer? Did you ever forget the name of someone you just met? Even in the best of cases, memory is surprisingly fragile. As a person gets older, memory glitches can become a little more common -- and more frightening. Young people laugh off their forgetful moments, but many older people worry that every slipup is a sign of Alzhei...

What is 5-HTP? Short for 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, 5-HTP is a natural stepping-stone between a nutrient in our food and a crucial compound in our brains. Specifically, it's a substance that links the amino acid tryptophan to the chemical messenger serotonin. Tryptophan, which our bodies can't make but we do get from many foods, quickly turns to 5-HTP in the brain. 5-HTP, in turn, rapidly becomes ser...

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, also called ubiquinone) is a vitamin-like substance that's present in foods and is also produced by your cells to help convert food into energy. The Japanese were the first to start taking it in supplement form, and it's still commonly used in Japan to treat heart-failure patients. During the 1980s, CoQ10 gained popularity in this country as an energy-booster; it's now touted ...

What is autism? Autism is a brain disorder that can severely limit a child's ability to communicate or interact with others. National statistics for how many children are affected by autism don't yet exist. However, the National Institute for Mental Health estimates that three to six children out of every 1,000 suffer from autism. The condition strikes boys more often than girls. About half of a...

What is this illness called 'mad cow' disease? The illness got its name because cows afflicted with it stumble around as if they've lost their balance. They act demented (or "mad," as the British say) and quickly die of the disease. The cows actually have a fast-moving, irreversible brain disease. They are infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a degenerative central nervous system...

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba ) is the only remaining member of a family of trees that flourished centuries ago in ancient China. Dubbed a living fossil, ginkgo today thrives worldwide in parks and gardens, and in plantations where leaves of carefully pruned ginkgo shrubs are harvested and processed into supplements. Although the people of China have been using the fruits and seeds since 2800 BC, only dur...

There's still no cure for Alzheimer's or known way to prevent it. But if you're worried about developing the disease, your doctor just might give you an unexpected prescription. She might urge you to exercise daily, eat a diet rich in whole foods, and watch your weight. She might even recommend taking a language class or some dance lessons. Or having a fish dinner twice a week. Or adding curry dis...

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