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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

25 Sep

Get Moving For Your Memory

Light exercise may boost your brain power.

24 Sep

Breastfeeding Reduces Obesity Risk?

Breastfed babies are much less likely to be obese later in life.

20 Sep

Air Pollution and Brain Health

Air pollution may up the risk of dementia.

Breast Cancer Treatment Adherence Rates Vary by Race

Breast Cancer Treatment Adherence Rates Vary by Race

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black women are more likely than white women to skip important hormonal breast cancer treatments, new research indicates.

Endocrine therapy is used to add, block or get rid of naturally occurring hormones like estrogen and progesterone that trigger certain types of breast cancer, the study au...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 25, 2018
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Number of Infants Born With Syphilis Reaches 20-Year High: CDC

Number of Infants Born With Syphilis Reaches 20-Year High: CDC

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The number of newborns suffering from syphilis has nearly tripled in recent years, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.

Cases jumped from 362 in 2013 to 918 in 2017 -- the highest number in 20 years. Cases were seen in 37 states, mostly in the West and South.

"We've been seeing i...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • September 25, 2018
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Health Insurance Companies Are Prime Targets for Hackers

Health Insurance Companies Are Prime Targets for Hackers

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hackers are targeting medical record data more than ever, and their most rewarding prey appears to be health insurance companies, a new study suggests.

Data breaches involving health plans accounted for 63 percent of all breached records that occurred between 2010 and 2017, said lead research...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 25, 2018
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Overweight in Pregnancy? Here's How to Keep Excess Pounds at Bay

Overweight in Pregnancy? Here's How to Keep Excess Pounds at Bay

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Heather Kinion never spent much time thinking about her weight. But when she got pregnant, that changed.

"My sister had a baby a few years before me and had gained a bunch of weight, and she still hadn't lost it when I got pregnant," Kinion said. So the Chicago-area mom-to-be was happy to si...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • September 25, 2018
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AHA: Bystander CPR Rates Rising, But Survival Chances Worse for Women

AHA: Bystander CPR Rates Rising, But Survival Chances Worse for Women

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- More people are stepping in to help give CPR when someone's heart stops, and first responders are intervening at higher levels -- but survival rates are higher for men who have cardiac arrests than for women, a recent study suggests.

Based on data for 8,100 people in 16 North Car...

Genes May Control How Tough It Is to Stop Drinking

Genes May Control How Tough It Is to Stop Drinking

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When they give up booze, some alcoholics have more severe withdrawal symptoms than others. This discrepancy may come down to genetics, researchers say.

The Yale University team hopes its findings ultimately lead to treatments that ease the discomfort of "detox."

Heavy drinkers can d...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 25, 2018
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Antibiotics May Cure Appendicitis -- No Operation Needed

Antibiotics May Cure Appendicitis -- No Operation Needed

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're suffering from acute appendicitis, you might be successfully treated with antibiotics and never need an operation to remove your appendix, Finnish researchers report.

Most appendicitis cases are uncomplicated, which simply means the organ hasn't ruptured, so they can be treated with...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • September 25, 2018
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Experimental Vaccine Shows Promise in Preventing TB

Experimental Vaccine Shows Promise in Preventing TB

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Tuberculosis remains the most lethal of infectious diseases worldwide, killing more than 1.6 million people a year. But researchers say a new vaccine might prevent half of full-blown illnesses in infected people who receive the shot.

"We found that the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis was ...

  • E.J. Mundell
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  • September 25, 2018
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Consumer Reports Says Warnings About Tainted Beef Don't Go Far Enough

Consumer Reports Says Warnings About Tainted Beef Don't Go Far Enough

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- To avoid possible E. coli infection, check your freezer and toss out any ground beef bought in the United States between June 21 and July 11, food safety advocates advise.

Consumer Reports believes U.S. regulators didn't go far enough in their response to a deadly E. coli outbreak in Florida....

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 25, 2018
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Scientists Developing Blood Test for Drowsy Driving

Scientists Developing Blood Test for Drowsy Driving

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Here's a welcome alert: Scientists say they're inching closer to a blood test for drowsy driving.

A computer algorithm effectively differentiated between sleep-deprived and well-rested people by picking up changes in expression of certain genes, British researchers report.

"Identify...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 25, 2018
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Exercise May Delay Rare Form of Alzheimer's

Exercise May Delay Rare Form of Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise might delay a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that 2.5 hours of walking or other physical activity a week thwarted mental decline tied to autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD). This is an inherited form of disease...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 25, 2018
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The Physician Assistant Will See You Now

The Physician Assistant Will See You Now

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One of the key members of your health-care team might not be a doctor or a nurse, but a physician assistant.

A physician assistant -- or PA -- is a specialist with training to fill gaps in primary care, not only in rural communities, but also in busy practices in other areas. If you call your...

  • Len Canter
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  • September 25, 2018
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Short Bout of Exercise Might Boost Your Memory

Short Bout of Exercise Might Boost Your Memory

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Just a little bit of light exercise can immediately improve a person's memory, new Japanese research suggests.

How little? The small study involved 36 healthy college-aged men and women and found that just 10 minutes of relaxed cycling on a stationary bike was all i...

  • Alan Mozes
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  • September 25, 2018
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Gun Victims More Likely to Die Than Other Trauma Patients

Gun Victims More Likely to Die Than Other Trauma Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Gunshot wounds are far deadlier than other types of trauma, according to a new study.

Gunshot victims are five times more likely to need a blood transfusion. They also require 10 times more blood units than people involved in falls, car accidents, stabbings or other assaults, according to rese...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 24, 2018
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Gender 'Nonconformity' Takes Mental Toll on Teens

Gender 'Nonconformity' Takes Mental Toll on Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- American teens whose behavior, appearance or lifestyle do not conform to widely held views on what it is to be a "normal" male or female face a high risk for mental distress and drug abuse, new research warns.

The findings were culled from a national survey exploring the psychological risk pro...

  • Alan Mozes
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  • September 24, 2018
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Coffee Shop Workers on Front Lines of Opioid Crisis

Coffee Shop Workers on Front Lines of Opioid Crisis

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that employees in coffee shops and fast food places can be trained to respond to opioid overdoses at their places of business.

"Because opioid overdoses may occur in public bathrooms, business managers and staff unwittingly become first responders. Providing training to ...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 24, 2018
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Spinal Implant Could Be Breakthrough for Paralyzed Patients

Spinal Implant Could Be Breakthrough for Paralyzed Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A paraplegic man has regained the ability to move his legs and walk with assistance, thanks to an implanted electrode stimulating his spinal cord, Mayo Clinic researchers say.

Surgeons implanted the electrode below the level of 29-year-old Jered Chinnock's spinal cord injury. A 2013 snowmobile...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 24, 2018
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Booster Shots Safe for Most Kids Who Have Vaccine Reaction: Study

Booster Shots Safe for Most Kids Who Have Vaccine Reaction: Study

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most children who have mild to moderate reactions to a vaccine can safely receive booster shots, new research suggests.

Canadian scientists found there is a low rate of recurring reactions following subsequent vaccinations. They said their findings should help inform doctors and parents about ...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 24, 2018
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Shorter People May Duck Risk of Varicose Veins

Shorter People May Duck Risk of Varicose Veins

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- How tall you are might play a part in whether you are unlucky enough to develop varicose veins, a new study suggests.

Every additional 4 inches in height increases your risk of varicose veins by about 25 percent, said researcher Dr. Erik Ingelsson, a professor of cardiovascular medicine with S...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 24, 2018
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Milk Straight From Breast Best for Baby's Weight

Milk Straight From Breast Best for Baby's Weight

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Breast milk from the bottle may not have as many benefits for a baby's weight as feeding straight from the breast, a new study suggests.

The researchers found what many others have: Overall, breastfed babies tended to have a healthier weight than those who were formula-fed.

However, ...

  • Amy Norton
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  • September 24, 2018
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