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Results for search "Infant / Child Care".

Health News Results - 176

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In the midst of the "anti-vaxxer" movement comes more scientific proof that vaccines help save children's lives.

Researchers report that since the 2006 introduction of a vaccine against rotavirus -- a common and potentially fatal cause of infant diarrhea -- U.S. cases have fallen dramatically.

What's more, the rotavirus "season" is now...

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As laws around marijuana relax nationwide and the drug becomes more popular, American women are increasingly using pot during pregnancy, a new study finds.

The study was based on data from more than 467,000 women collected between 2002 and 2017. The researchers found that the percentage of women who said they'd used cannabis at least once dur...

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breast milk provides many benefits for babies. And now researchers say mother's milk contains an antibody that protects premature infants from an often-deadly intestinal bacterial disease called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies protect against this disease. And preterm infants get IgA from their mother's breas...

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Father's Day is a once-a-year celebration of the bond between Dad and his kids, but cementing that bond takes a year-round commitment.

A new study suggests the type of involvement (caregiving vs. play) and the timing (workday vs. weekend) make a difference.

University of Georgia researchers found that dads who take time off work to be w...

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating against the common infant infection rotavirus not only cuts a child's odds of getting sick, it might also prevent them from developing type 1 diabetes later in life, new research suggests.

Infants who got all of the recommended doses of the "stomach flu" virus vaccine had a 33% lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes compared ...

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your newborn is breastfeeding and losing weight, will feeding her formula do any harm?

Though doctors have long advised against it, a new study suggests giving baby both formula and the breast is OK.

Researchers said the answer depends on how long a mother intends to breastfeed and it needs to be balanced against the risks newbor...

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding moms with healthy eating habits have slimmer infants, who could then be protected from obesity later, researchers say.

Rapid weight gain and fat accumulation during an infant's first six months of life is a risk factor for obesity later on, they explained.

"A baby who is shooting up through the percentiles in weight-fo...

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns who were exposed to opioids in the womb have stronger-than-normal reactions to pain and may require special care sooner than previously thought, researchers report.

Opioids include prescription pain medications and illegal drugs such as heroin.

The study included 22 newborns who were exposed to opioids in the womb and 15 wh...

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A car seat is the safest place for an infant while traveling in a car. But putting your baby to sleep in a portable car seat at home can be deadly, a new study warns.

Over a decade, nearly 12,000 babies in the United States died while sleeping -- about 3% of them while in an "infant sitting device," such as a car seat, stroller, sw...

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Few things are as distressing as baby's cries when his or her first teeth are coming in, but it's important to know what not to use to soothe that pain.

Over the years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued warnings about many teething products, starting with over-the-counter gels and liquids containing benzocaine, which acts...

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eating solid foods is a milestone in your child's life. With the right precautions to reduce the risk of choking, you can make this a safe transition.

Teach children to sit up straight from the earliest age. Always supervise mealtime. A choking child may not make any noise to alert you from another room. Don't rush kids, or let them put more tha...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Are your mornings always chaotic? Between making breakfast, packing lunches, getting everyone dressed and hunting for homework assignments, it's easy to feel like you've put in a day's worth of work before 9 a.m.

The answer is to start the night before, with kids and parents picking out the next day's clothes and filling backpacks and...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Are many women who smoke switching to e-cigarettes during pregnancy?

That's the suggestion from a new study that finds close to 4% of pregnant American women are vaping, and the rate of e-cigarette use is actually higher among pregnant women than women who aren't pregnant.

The researchers also found that e-cigarette use in pregn...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The Kids II company is recalling nearly 700,000 of its Rocking Sleepers for infants, after reports of babies dying have been linked to the products' use.

In an announcement posted Friday on the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) website, the agency says the recall follows deaths occurring "after the infants rolled from their bac...

SATURDAY, April 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Another reason breast is best: Breast milk boosts levels of chemicals crucial for brain growth and development in premature babies with a very low birth weight, a new study reveals.

"Our previous research established that vulnerable preterm infants who are fed breast milk early in life have improved brain growth ...

SUNDAY, April 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents and doctors often overlook how overweight kids are, which could leave youngsters at increased risk for health problems linked to excess weight, British researchers say.

They reviewed 87 studies that included nearly 25,000 children, age 19 and younger, and their parents.

The researchers found that ...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The death of a baby is always tragic, but safe sleep practices could have prevented some recent suffocation deaths, new research claims.

The study found two factors appeared to be behind a majority of infant deaths by suffocation:

  • A baby not sleeping on his or her back.
  • A baby sleeping in an adult bed.

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A newborn's first stool holds telltale clues about his risk for becoming an overweight 3-year-old, according to a European study.

The clues come from the population of bacteria (microbiome) in the baby's gut.

Finnish researchers used genetic sequencing to analyze the first stool produced by 212 newborns and another sample at age 1....

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 100 kids a day are rushed to U.S. emergency rooms after accidentally swallowing a toy piece, battery, magnet or other foreign object, according to new research.

That's almost twice as many as in the mid-1990s.

"The sheer number of these injuries is cause for concern," said Dr. Danielle Orsagh-Yentis, lead author of the study p...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- During pregnancy, even harmless-sounding "natural" supplements should be avoided, a new research review suggests.

The review of 74 published studies found that a handful linked certain herbal products to increased risks of pregnancy complications -- including preterm birth and cesarean delivery.

That's not proof that the suppleme...

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play Sleeper has been linked to dozens of infant deaths and should be recalled immediately, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said Tuesday.

The inclined sleeper has been associated with 32 sleep-related infant deaths, according to a new Consumer Reports analysis.

Along with urging a recall by the...

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A public health emergency has been declared in New York City as it grapples withone of the largest measles outbreaks in decades, whichis centered in theultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn.

Unvaccinated people living in certain ZIP codes in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, will have to get the measles vaccine, and those who do not comply will b...

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a scary statistic: Every three minutes, an allergic reaction to a food sends someone to the emergency department, according to the nonprofit group Food Allergy Research & Education.

Food allergies affect one in every 13 children under age 18. Eight foods account for the majority of all reactions: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, soy,...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With childhood obesity rates soaring, prevention should start at a very early age. One approach gaining in popularity is baby-led weaning.

This means that, when solid foods are introduced, ideally at 6 months, parents let the baby feed himself or herself rather than mom or dad spoon-feeding the typical baby food purees.

This method ...

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a fussy baby doesn't just rob a new mother of sleep -- it can also increase her risk of depression, a new study finds.

That fussiness, combined with premature birth, may significantly affect a new mother's mood.

"We found that maternal depression risk varied by gestational age and infant fussiness," said senior study author...

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New parents worry about a lot of things, but the American Academy of Pediatrics says one thing they can cross off that list is concern about giving high-allergy foods too early in life.

In fact, the pediatric group says it's likely better to introduce foods like peanut butter when kids are around 6 months of age.

"There's no reason ...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a newborn comes home, parents know sleep goes out the window. But new research shows that sleep loss could plague Mom and Dad for up to six years.

"What is new in the current study is that we compare sleep before pregnancy with sleep up to six years after birth," study author Sakari Lemola explained. "We were surprised to see that sleep ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When times are tough, single moms tend to spend more on their children's health care than on their own, a new study finds.

But two-parent families are less likely to make that change, the researchers said.

The study looked at how losing a job, money or health insurance affects a family's health priorities.

"In particular,...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The electronic babysitter is alive and thriving in the new digital age.

A new study says it all: Children under the age of 2 spend twice the amount of time in front of a screen each day -- almost three hours, to be exact -- as they did 20 years ago.

Kids are being exposed to far more screen time than recommended by pediatric experts...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are given general anesthesia for an hour are unlikely to suffer harm, but the safety of longer and repeated exposure remains unknown, a new study says.

Among more than 700 infants in seven countries, the researchers didn't find any measurable neurodevelopmental or behavioral problems up to the age of 5.

"Nearly half the g...

FRIDAY, Feb. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The benefits of breastfeeding are wide-ranging.

For baby, they include protection against infections and illnesses, including asthma, as well as reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Babies breastfed for six months are also less likely to become obese.

For mom, breastfeeding decreases the risks of breast and ovaria...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Areas of the United States with high unemployment and few mental health services have higher rates of newborns who were exposed to opioids in the womb, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on 6.3 million births between 2009 and 2015 in 580 counties in Florida, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, North Carolina, New York, Tennessee and...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young children spend a lot of time fiddling with smartphones, tapping away at tablets and staring at TV screens.

Could this time be taking away from their early physical and mental development?

A new study argues that's precisely the case -- screen time can affect how well children perform on developmental tests.

"Kids who...

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you want breastfeeding to go smoothly, you might want to ask the hospital to delay that first bath for your newborn, new research suggests.

For decades, it's been standard procedure to give newborns a bath within the first few hours after birth, but the new finding suggests that waiting 12 or more hours before doing so may promote breast...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting kids to try new foods can become a daily showdown. One promising approach: expose babies early on to varied tastes and textures.

Researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that food experiences when just 14 months old can influence the eating habits that children will exhibit at age 3. And introducing a variety of fruits and vegetables ...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- We know that early learning can set up a child for success. A study done by researchers at Penn State University found out just how early that learning should start -- by age 2.

For this study, parents filled out surveys about how many words their 2-year-olds knew, and then the researchers checked in with them three years later when their child...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For common birthmarks, doctors should abandon the traditional wait-and-see approach, a leading group of pediatricians says.

Instead, physicians should try to identify those that could cause scarring or medical problems and begin immediate treatment, according to a new American Academy of Pediatrics guideline.

Infantile hemangiomas...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teething jewelry products, such as necklaces, pose significant safety risks and have been tied to at least one baby's death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Potential threats include choking, strangulation, injury to the mouth and infection. These products should not be used to relieve teething pain in infants, the agency said.

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've identified genetic mutations linked with a blood vessel defect that can lead to deadly brain bleeds in babies.

A rare hereditary condition, called vein of Galen malformation, causes high-pressured blood to be pumped from arteries into veins. The veins aren't meant to handle such pressure and can rupture, spilling blood...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When a baby starts sniffling and sneezing, the type of bacteria in their nose may predict how long the cold will last, a new study finds.

Babies with a wide variety of bacteria in the nose recover faster from their first cold than those with less variety, the researchers said.

"It's well known that different types of bacteria live i...

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When unborn babies kick in the womb, they may be developing awareness of their bodies, British researchers say.

"Spontaneous movement and consequent feedback from the environment during the early developmental period are known to be necessary for proper brain mapping in animals such as rats. Here we showed that this may be true in humans, too,...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Infant ear infections can be a source of frustration for parents and babies alike. But there are steps to lessen them and, when they do occur, "less is more" is a better way to treat them.

A typical infection can begin with bacterial growth. Inflammation can lead to fluid buildup behind the eardrum. The eustachian tubes, which connect the m...

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Wondering if having a second child will affect your marriage even more than baby number one did?

There's no doubt that having a baby and changing from a couple into a family requires a lot of adjustment. But research shows that the adjustment period that follows a second child typically isn't as long.

For...

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it may help protect your child against allergies, new research suggests.

Researchers interviewed 128 U.S. mothers of infants a number of times over 18 months. Among the moms of babies who used pacifiers, 30 cleaned the pacifier by sterilization, 53 hand-washed the pacifier, and nine cleaned the pacifier by...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Head-size measurements can help screen for long-term IQ problems in very premature or very low birth weight babies, researchers say.

"Measuring head circumference and thus head growth in early childhood is a proxy measure of brain volume growth in early childhood," said study senior author Dieter Wolke, of the University of Warwick in Engla...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If your 6-month-old still wakes up at 2 a.m., a new study suggests you don't lose any additional sleep worrying about it.

Even if she's still not getting six to eight hours of uninterrupted shut-eye at night by her first birthday, it doesn't mean your baby isn't developing normally.

And, rest assured, it probably won't hurt your chil...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Breast milk and infant formula both encourage the growth of similar types of bacteria in a baby's digestive system, but the bacteria from the two forms of food work differently, researchers report.

These differences could have health effects that are currently unclear, according to the researchers.

Good bacteria in the digestive trac...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are wide variations between states when it comes to child restraint rules for ride-share services such as Lyft and Uber, researchers report.

This can cause uncertainty and confusion for parents and other caregivers. Ride-share vehicles typically don't come with a car seat, and an option to request one is available only in some cities, the...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Babies laugh just like monkeys, researchers report.

An analysis of recorded laughter from 44 infants, aged 3 to 18 months, revealed that the youngest babies laughed both as they inhaled and exhaled, just like nonhuman primates such as chimpanzees.

The older babies laughed mainly on the exhale, the same as older children and adults....

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A newborn can bring a sense of fulfillment to your life … and an equal amount of stress over everything from baby's health to your own parenting skills.

A few simple strategies can help both mom and dad relax.

First, expect to feel many different, often contradictory emotions. You might go from pure bliss as you look at your b...

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Wellness Library Results - 84

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, you want to show him his behavior is unacceptable and must change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages you don't want to send:

Why does my child have tantrums? Some preschoolers throw tantrums for the same reasons they did as toddlers: because they're exhausted, hungry, or scared. But at this age it's more likely because your child wants to test your authority or manipulate you. This isn't a knock on your parenting skills or a sign that he'll be a rebellious teenager; it's a normal part of his development and growing ind...

How can I stop my child from teasing? The short answer is you can't. Every child teases, from the peekaboo of infancy to the "I'm going to get you!" round-the-sofa chases of early childhood. But you can stop your child from teasing too much or too harshly. Try giving your child these simple dos and don'ts:

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? The best course is to help him develop his emotional intelligence (loosely defined as the ability to cope with one's own feelings as well as those of others). This will enable him to sense when his teasing is mean-spirited, hostile, or simply inappropriate. Here are some tips:

A few hundred years ago, doctors believed baby teeth could be deadly. In one year alone in 19th-century England, more than 5,000 babies supposedly died of teething. Today, we know that teething isn't really dangerous. New teeth can make your baby cranky and uncomfortable, but the misery will soon pass. Here's what you need to know to help both of you get through this trying time. How can I tell ...

Why does my child bite her nails? Nail biting is one of the somewhat misnamed "nervous habits," which also include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. But anxiety is only one reason children bite their nails; your child might be doing so for a number of other reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit....

How do I know when my child's ready? Boys tend to stay in diapers longer than girls, but most children are ready to potty-train sometime between their second and third birthdays. There's enormous variation, though: Some children train themselves when they're about 18-months-old, while others show no interest until after their fourth birthday. To figure out if it's time to start the process, ask ...

Why does my child bite her nails? Your child may bite her nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. Nail biting is most common in high-strung and spirited children, tends...

You're trying not to worry, but your child's third birthday is behind him -- and maybe his fourth or fifth -- and he's still in diapers. Don't despair. Learning to use the toilet is a skill much like learning to tie shoes or ride a bicycle, and it poses a different set of challenges for each child. Here are seven common problems and strategies for solving them. My child refuses to use the toilet...

Why does my child bite his nails? Children bite their nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. (None of these necessarily signals anxiety, so "nervous habits" is somethi...

Should I be worried that my toddler sucks his pacifier all the time? No. For children between the ages of 1 and 3, sucking on a thumb or pacifier is natural. It can help your child with new challenges, such as sleeping through the night, eating with the family, and going on a long car ride. Sucking is a life skill that your child began in the womb and perfected as an infant. As he becomes a todd...

Do I need a contract when I hire a nanny? No, but it's a good idea to go through the process of drawing one up. If you're an easygoing type and your nanny seems agreeable, you might not want to bother with writing a formal agreement that could bring prickly issues to the surface. But you and your nanny (and your partner, if you have one) really should have a conversation about the ground rules of...

Should I be worried that my 3-year-old won't go anywhere without his pacifier? No, but it's probably not too early to begin encouraging your child to be less dependent on it. Most children stop using pacifiers between the ages of 2 and 4, but many stop well before that. You can always force your child to do without his "binky" by taking it away. But you're much better off persuading him that giv...

Why does my toddler need a nap? Most 2- to 3-year-olds need 12 to 13 hours of sleep a day -- and it's a rare child who will stack them all together. Trying to adjust a child's schedule so she does may cause nighttime sleep problems, since being overtired can cause her to become hyperactive. How many naps does she need, and how long should I let her sleep? Most kids give up their morning nap by...

To ease the pressure you naturally feel about finding the most nurturing and safe environment for your child, it's smart to begin your search for daycare early. Make your first inquiries about six months before your child will start attending. In some areas you may need to get on the case even earlier. You can use this set of questions as a guide when you sit down to discuss a center's program w...

Why does my child interrupt me so often? Small children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exists for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before he forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore the very concept of interrupting makes no sense to your toddler....

Why does my child constantly interrupt me? Until they reach the age of 3 or 4, children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exist for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before she forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore, the very concept of interruptin...

Why does my child interrupt all the time? Interrupting comes naturally to children because they tend to forget that other people have needs that are as important (or almost, at least) as theirs. Even if your child knows that she's supposed to wait for a pause in the conversation and say, "Excuse me," the protocol slips her mind because what she has to say feels so urgent at that moment. Your ch...

Almost all new dads discover amazing talents in the first few days of fatherhood. But even the toughest guys can be afraid of babies -- especially their own. As soon as a first-time father carries his newborn through the front door, his life opens up to brand-new worries, doubts, and insecurities. Even before he unwraps that first diaper, his life has changed forever. Larry McGrail, a registered...

So you've heard great things about the magic of time-out -- the disciplinary tactic of removing a misbehaving child from the action for a dose of quiet time -- only it seems to have no effect on your little one? Here's guidance on how to resolve the five most common problems faced by parents who try time-out with a toddler. My child just ignores me. If your 1- or 2-year-old looks at you blankl...

Every once in a while, when you're at your wit's end, you give your child a time-out, but it never seems to work. Maybe he throws a tantrum or refuses to sit still and goes running through the house. Don't give up. Time-out -- checking misbehavior by removing your child from his current situation for a few minutes of quiet time -- is one of the most effective strategies in the parental game plan. ...

When your child acts up, often the best way to nip the behavior in the bud is to remove him from the activity at hand and give him some quiet time alone. This technique, known as time-out, is a great, nonviolent way to shape behavior. But the key to success is knowing the right time and way to introduce it. Here are six secrets to making the technique work. Understand what time-out is -- and isn...

Time-out is a method of checking misbehavior by removing your child from her current situation for a few minutes of quiet time. It's a great way to help your child calm down and regroup. Between the ages of 3 and 6, children are intensively learning rules and testing limits. Time-out can be particularly useful in establishing these, as long as you apply it consistently. Here are eight ways to make...

Before your baby is born, you should take time to make the great diaper decision: cloth or disposable? Both types have pluses and minuses, and neither option is clearly superior. Most parents today opt for disposable diapers, but some parents continue to swear by old-fashioned cloth. You may even go for a combination: cloth diapers at home and disposable when you go out. If you haven't already mad...

How can I tell if my child's too sick for daycare? It's not always easy. Obviously you don't want your kid to pass a phlegmy cough along to all his pals, but it's a much harder call when he has nothing more than a runny nose. In general, you shouldn't bring your child to daycare if the illness is contagious and could do anything more than make any youngster a little cranky. Here are some spe...

The only thing working parents dread hearing more than the words "I feel bad" from one of their kids is an early-morning phone call bringing the news that their nanny is ill. Instead of praying it won't happen and going into a panic when it does, make a plan. What are the options when I can't use my usual childcare? Backup options generally fall into one of two main categories: finding someone...

How can I make sure my child feels ready for daycare or preschool? For starters, remember that both you and your child will need time to get used to the new setup. Try to be patient; even if you make every effort to prepare your child, it will probably be a few days before she comes skipping over to you at pick-up time, more eager to show you her art project than to go home. Here are some tips...

If you're feeling anxious about your diaper-changing skills, don't worry: You'll get plenty of practice. The average child goes through about 7,000 diapers before becoming toilet trained. After a couple of years, you'll be a diaper virtuoso. For now, though, you need to learn the basics. With a few precautions, both you and your baby can breeze through those changes without much fuss or discomfor...

What is emotional IQ? Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand and manage your own feelings. Along with it comes the capacity to empathize, meaning to be aware and respectful of the feelings of people around you. If your child has a high emotional IQ, she'll be better able to cope with her feelings, calm herself down, and understand and relate well to other people, according to psyc...

How do I choose a babysitter? Start with someone old enough to do the job. According to the American Red Cross, parents should not choose someone younger than 11. The authors of What to Expect the First Year are more cautious, suggesting a child isn't ready for babysitting until age 14. Ultimately, you're the best judge of someone's capabilities and maturity. Talk to the sitter, watch him or her...

When you have to select a nanny, you may long to see Mary Poppins sailing her umbrella onto the front lawn, ready to offer her crackerjack services. But when you snap out of the daydream, how do you evaluate the competence and kindness of that shy 22-year-old who actually shows up in response to your ad? Trust your guts, and use these questions as a guide. Be sure to read them over before the fi...

Long before you take your new baby home, you need to think about a crucial issue: Who will take care of her at times when parents are otherwise occupied? Whether you're staying at home or quickly going back to work, you can make sure your baby spends all day, every day, in a safe, nurturing environment. Many factors will influence your choice, including cost, convenience, and, most of all, your ba...

Choosing a baby doctor is something that many parents don't think much about. They spend hours picking out a crib and push a dozen different strollers before settling on one, but they barely consider the person who will be a vital part of their child's development. But nothing could be more important. The doctor who gives your baby her first set of immunizations could very well be the same docto...

My toddler kicks, bites, and hits playmates. Should I be concerned? Not necessarily. Aggressive behavior is a normal part of emotional and behavioral development, especially among toddlers. Almost every child hits, kicks, and yells; toddlers and even preschoolers often bite when they're overwhelmed by strong emotions. Generally, you can expect your child's aggressive behavior to taper off by age ...

They poke, they complain, they have a strange need to use the restroom every 20 minutes, and they have almost no sense of time and distance -- in short, young kids are not always ideal companions on a long car trip. Then again, what fun is a family vacation if you don't take the family? In minivans and station wagons across the country, parents doing what they can to keep everyone safe and sane on...

If your child is old enough to have teeth, he's old enough to have tooth problems. For infants and toddlers, the biggest threat to dental health is baby bottle tooth decay. Here's what you need to know about this common -- but largely preventable -- problem. What is baby bottle tooth decay? Milk, apple juice, formula -- just about everything young children drink contains sugar. When a child drin...

In the first month of life, your baby's social life revolves around you. She's already familiar with your voice, which she could hear from inside the womb. One of her first images is likely to be your face as she is brought to the breast (or bottle). At her age, all she needs for optimum emotional and social development is an attentive parent, lots of touch, and love. Your baby may spend so much...

This is the month for motion. Sitters become scooters, and scooters become crawlers. A baby who used to be glued to floor can suddenly go just about anywhere she wants, if she has the time and determination. She might even be able to pull herself up on a coffee table or couch, opening all sorts of new possibilities for exploration and mischief. You can encourage her new skills by giving her plen...

Not long ago, your baby was far too bewildered to have much of a social life. It's hard to connect with people when you have no idea who they are. Now she's really starting to notice people, and she likes what she sees. She's crying less and smiling more, especially when you come into view. She might even let out a full-bellied laugh when you play with her. She's becoming more active, more engagin...

Your baby used to live in his own little world, but he's quickly turning into a social butterfly. He's starting to join in conversations, and he uses sounds and gestures to encourage you to pick him up and play with him. (If he doesn't seek attention in these ways, be sure to tell his doctor or nurse practitioner.) He's just beginning to realize that people will respond to his actions. And the res...

For the first couple of months, the relationship with your baby was a one-way street. You gave her love and attention, and she soaked it in. She could smile and cry, but she never really tried to connect with you or the other people in her life. Now, in her fourth month, the relationship is finally starting to flow in two directions. She has the brainpower to know what she wants, and she's finding...

Your baby has a lot on his mind. Now that he's moving around, he faces all sorts of new decisions and dilemmas. Which part of the house should he explore next? What's the best way to get there? And what should he do once he arrives? He's also thinking harder about the world around him and his place in it. Even when he makes bad decisions -- why would he put oatmeal there? -- he's constantly buildi...

At this age, your baby's social circle isn't very large. Of all of the friends, relatives, and strangers who drift in and out of her life, she really only cares about a few key people. And you're one of them. Throughout the day, she'll make many attempts to get your attention and draw you into her world. Yelling may be one of her favorite tactics. When she screams for attention, the best thing y...

Your 6-month-old still has a limited social life. He can recognize his mom and dad, and he enjoys it when someone plays with him or talks to him. But at this age, he doesn't give much thought to other people. His notion of "love" may be primitive, but he still needs plenty of it. You should comfort him when he cries and give him lots of cuddles. At this age, it's impossible to spoil him. He just...

Your baby is on the verge of a scientific breakthrough. After many experiments, he's starting to realize that his actions have consequences. When he hits his mobile, it moves. When he lets go of his rattle, it falls. And when he cries, mom comforts him. He's learning that life isn't quite as random as it seemed. More important, he's learning that he has some control over his world. He's especial...

Your baby loves to move. It's almost as if she still remembers her cramped quarters from a few months ago and is making the most of her newfound freedom. She can get a surprising amount of exercise while lying on her back. Put her down on her blanket, and she'll probably kick and flap as if trying to take flight. She's not getting very far, but her excited squeals tell you she's having a great t...

Your baby lives in a perplexing world, but some things are coming into focus. New research has shown that your baby now has 20/60 vision, although his brain isn't able to process all of its visual information yet. For the first time, his eyes are working together, giving him the gift of depth perception. Now when he reaches for a toy, he's less likely to miss by a mile. His eyes can also track mov...

Your baby may spend a lot of time looking pensive, but she's not exactly a deep thinker. When she furrows her brow and purses her lips, she's more likely to be filling her pants than doing algebra. Still, she's starting to take some amazing mental leaps. For the first time, she's beginning to understand the wonders of cause and effect. She'll start to realize that her crib shakes when she kicks ...

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