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Health News Results - 492

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers not only take on the lion's share of physical chores, they also shoulder most of the "invisible labor" involved in making sure the household is humming along, new research suggests.

Going beyond cooking and laundry, this means the mental strain of making sure there's enough food for bag lunches, teacher meetings are on the calendar, ...

MONDAY, Jan. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- No parent wants to see their child catch a cold, but some take prevention measures that have little basis in science, a new survey shows.

For example, 51 percent of parents said they give their child an over-the-counter vitamin or supplement to prevent colds, even though there's no evidence they work.

Seventy-one percent of parents s...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When children are having suicidal thoughts, their parents may often be in the dark, a new study shows.

The study included more than 5,000 kids, aged 11 to 17, and one parent for each child. Researchers found that among the children, 8 percent said they had contemplated suicide at some time. But only half of their parents were aware of it.

...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting kids to try new foods can become a daily showdown. One promising approach: expose babies early on to varied tastes and textures.

Researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that food experiences when just 14 months old can influence the eating habits that children will exhibit at age 3. And introducing a variety of fruits and vegetables ...

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cereal TV ads aimed at young children put them at increased risk for obesity and cancer, researchers warn.

A poor diet, including too much sugar, can lead to obesity, a known risk factor for 13 cancers.

"One factor believed to contribute to children's poor quality diets is the marketing of nutritionally poor foods directly to childr...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know how important fiber is for overall health, making meals more filling and staying "regular."

But did you know that children need their fair share of fiber, too? And for the same reasons.

How much is enough? In general, the U.S. Institute of Medicine states that monitoring fiber intake should start early in life, and by thei...

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say children's skeletons are maturing sooner than they did early in the 20th century, and this could affect the timing of certain orthopedic treatments.

Girls are reaching full skeletal maturity nearly 10 months earlier and boys nearly seven months earlier, according to the University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers.

...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of kids with Down syndrome often worry whether their children can develop life skills, but new research suggests that the picture is far from bleak.

"More and more parents are opting for prenatal testing during their pregnancies, and if they learn about a diagnosis of Down syndrome they want to know real-life answers to such questions,"...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- We know that early learning can set up a child for success. A study done by researchers at Penn State University found out just how early that learning should start -- by age 2.

For this study, parents filled out surveys about how many words their 2-year-olds knew, and then the researchers checked in with them three years later when their child...

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Moving from one community to another can be difficult for everyone in the family, especially if leaving friends and relatives behind. But the problems can be magnified for kids who have to switch middle or high schools.

Studies show that, for high school students, moving just once in a 12-month period can cut in half the likelihood of their g...

MONDAY, Dec. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Forcing children to apologize before they're ready may do more harm than good, researchers say.

Children know when someone is truly sorry and an insincere apology may increase the offended child's dislike of the child offering the apology, University of Michigan scientists reported.

It's better to give the offending child time and h...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Regular bedtimes and adequate sleep during childhood may contribute toward a healthy weight in the teen years, a new study finds.

The study included nearly 2,200 kids in 20 U.S. cities. One-third of them had consistent, age-appropriate bedtimes between ages 5 and 9, according to their mothers.

Compared to that group, those who had no...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the past two decades, opioid overdose death rates among U.S. kids and teens have tripled, a new study shows.

Young children have either died from accidental ingestion of narcotics or from intentional poisoning. Meanwhile, teens have died from unintentional overdoses, using their parents' prescription painkillers or narcotics bought on the s...

MONDAY, Dec. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The exhaustion of a new baby can have negative fitness consequences as you lose the motivation to exercise and feel there's no time to get to the gym.

But not exercising actually worsens fatigue, makes it harder to lose your baby weight, and increases the risk of chronic health problems down the road.

Don't fret, though: There's a po...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teething jewelry products, such as necklaces, pose significant safety risks and have been tied to at least one baby's death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Potential threats include choking, strangulation, injury to the mouth and infection. These products should not be used to relieve teething pain in infants, the agency said.

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sending report cards home from school on Fridays is linked to a surge in child abuse, a new study finds.

"It's a pretty astonishing finding," said lead study author Melissa Bright, a research scientist with the University of Florida's Anita Zucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studies.

"It's sad, but the good news is there...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One in 4 American parents who drink over the holidays don't think about whether they'll be able to take care of their children the day after, a new survey shows.

"Most parents planning to drink alcoholic beverages on a night out arrange for a designated driver and child care for the event itself," said survey co-dir...

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Good sleep routines can help children get the rest they need, researchers say.

For the new report, investigators reviewed 44 studies from 16 countries in North America, Europe and Asia. The studies included a total nearly 300,000 children, aged 4 months to 18 years.

"Good sleep hygiene gives children the ...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When a baby starts sniffling and sneezing, the type of bacteria in their nose may predict how long the cold will last, a new study finds.

Babies with a wide variety of bacteria in the nose recover faster from their first cold than those with less variety, the researchers said.

"It's well known that different types of bacteria live i...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are so closely linked that they not only run in families, but each increases the risk of the other in future siblings, a new study finds.

Younger siblings of children with autism have a 30-fold increased relative risk they'll be diagnosed with autism themselves. They're also nearly fou...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The numbers are alarming.

According to U.S. health officials, more than 200,000 children aged 14 or under are treated each year in emergency departments for playground-related injuries, about 10 percent of which involve "TBIs" -- or traumatic brain injuries.

Modern playground designs help reduce the risk of injury from falls, but they...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Gavin Kuykendall's life has been shaped by his fight against heart disease. Now almost 12, he recently expressed all he's been through -- by writing a letter to his heart disease.

"You made my parents very sad," he said, reading his letter in a video. "You tried to make my birthday an overwhelming and unhappy day. Even though you...

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's an adjustment period for almost every new college student -- many young people have struggles balancing independence and a heavy workload. But there are some signs that suggest your young person needs more serious help than a care package from home.

Some problems are temporary, like anxiety and stress, which affect huge numbers of coll...

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're shopping for toys this holiday season, make sure some simple, old-fashioned items are on your list, pediatricians say.

In a new report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is making recommendations on the best toys to buy for babies and young children. The bottom line: The traditional beats the digital.

"This report is ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A 6-year-old boy with severe asthma wasn't responding to the usual treatments. It was only when family members stopped smoking marijuana at home that his breathing got better, according to his doctor.

The boy's case shows that exposure to secondhand pot smoke can worsen asthma in children who have a marijuana allergy, a new study reports.

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Infant ear infections can be a source of frustration for parents and babies alike. But there are steps to lessen them and, when they do occur, "less is more" is a better way to treat them.

A typical infection can begin with bacterial growth. Inflammation can lead to fluid buildup behind the eardrum. The eustachian tubes, which connect the m...

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Wondering if having a second child will affect your marriage even more than baby number one did?

There's no doubt that having a baby and changing from a couple into a family requires a lot of adjustment. But research shows that the adjustment period that follows a second child typically isn't as long.

For...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Not all the toys in Santa's sack are safe to play with. Among this year's most dangerous playthings are data-collecting dolls and fidget spinners full of lead, a new report says.

"We should be able to trust that the toys we buy are safe. However, until that's the case, toy buyers need to watch out for common hazards when shopping for children...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a pot-smoking parent and you think your kids aren't affected, think again.

New research found evidence of secondhand marijuana smoke exposure in nearly half of children whose parents smoke the drug.

"While the effects of tobacco smoke have been studied extensively, we are still learning about marijuana exposure," said resea...

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it may help protect your child against allergies, new research suggests.

Researchers interviewed 128 U.S. mothers of infants a number of times over 18 months. Among the moms of babies who used pacifiers, 30 cleaned the pacifier by sterilization, 53 hand-washed the pacifier, and nine cleaned the pacifier by...

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Milk allergy affects more than half of American infants who have food allergies in their first year of life, a new study finds.

However, study lead author Christopher Warren said, "Our findings suggest that while milk allergy is relatively common during infancy, many children are likely to outgrow their milk allergies.

"We observed t...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Breast milk and infant formula both encourage the growth of similar types of bacteria in a baby's digestive system, but the bacteria from the two forms of food work differently, researchers report.

These differences could have health effects that are currently unclear, according to the researchers.

Good bacteria in the digestive trac...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Sudden cardiac arrest -- when the heart stops beating -- is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. To help save lives, automated external defibrillators, which shock the heart back into a regular beat, have been placed in many public places.

Now, these portable AED devices may improve the chance of survival among children ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are wide variations between states when it comes to child restraint rules for ride-share services such as Lyft and Uber, researchers report.

This can cause uncertainty and confusion for parents and other caregivers. Ride-share vehicles typically don't come with a car seat, and an option to request one is available only in some cities, the...

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Children who grow up in distressing or traumatic environments are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke by the time they reach middle age, according to a new study.

While previous research has found links between adverse childhood experiences and cardiovascular disease risk factors in adulthood, the new study explored whe...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- HPV vaccination rates are still too low to cut cervical cancer cases as much as is possible in the United States, a new report warns.

While HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination has increased in recent years, rates remain well below the federal government's Healthy People 2020 goal of 80 percent of age-eligible adolescents, according to the r...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A newborn can bring a sense of fulfillment to your life … and an equal amount of stress over everything from baby's health to your own parenting skills.

A few simple strategies can help both mom and dad relax.

First, expect to feel many different, often contradictory emotions. You might go from pure bliss as you look at your b...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than 3 million older Americans are now raising their grandchildren as their own, even as they struggle with health problems and financial stresses, a new survey shows.

Not only that, the children they take in are more likely to be troubled as they struggle to adjust to new lives, the researchers found.

Still, these grandparents s...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics is strengthening its recommendation to ban spanking and other forms of corporal punishment, citing new research that says that type of discipline can affect normal brain development.

Harsh verbal punishment, such as shaming or humiliation, is also a threat to children, the AAP says in an updated policy stateme...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Trying to avoid "panic parenting" is the reason why many single women freeze their eggs for non-medical reasons, a small new study suggests.

Panic parenting refers to having a relationship just to have a baby.

"Whilst the number of women freezing their eggs remains small, many more are now considering this option as a way of extending...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many kids love a quick bowl of instant soup or tasty noodles, but these fast foods cause almost 10,000 scald burns in children each year in the United States, a new study estimates.

What's more, researchers found that two out of every 10 scald burns that send kids to the ER are caused by microwavable instant soup spills.

"We suspect ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obese kids may have extra difficulty with schoolwork and coping under stress, a preliminary study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 23,000 parents, researchers found that kids who were obese were less likely to show certain indicators of "flourishing," versus their normal-weight peers.

That meant less engagement in schoolwork and learni...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children face an increased risk for sleep problems if a parent suffers a serious injury, especially if the parent has a brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study reveals.

Researchers used U.S. Military Health System records to identify more than 485,000 children of more than 272,000 parents who were seriously injured i...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Safety concerns are a main reason American parents hesitate to have their children vaccinated against the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a new study.

The finding challenges a common reason given by doctors for not recommending the vaccine more forcefully -- that parents are concerned the vaccination will lead to...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Trick-or-treating is a Halloween tradition that can quickly turn disastrous, with new research showing a more than 40 percent spike in pedestrian deaths on the spooky holiday.

Kids wearing dark costumes, zigzagging across streets and popping out between parked cars are potentially tragic targets for drivers rushing home after work, explained ...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Rules for new drivers instituted in Massachusetts back in 2007 have led to fewer car crashes, including fewer deadly crashes, among drivers in their teens.

And most of the rules are ones that Moms and Dads can set no matter what state you live in.

The Massachusetts "graduated driver licensing program" requires 16- and 17-year-olds t...

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of U.S. children are being diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

But parents shouldn't be too quick to get their child checked for ADHD, a child expert says.

"The key to determining if your child has the disorder is the consistent demonstration of at least six specific traits for a minimum of six m...

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young children are more likely to be awakened by a smoke alarm that uses their mother's voice than one with a typical high-pitched alarm, a new study finds.

The mother's voice alarm also resulted in much quicker escape times.

"Children are remarkably resistant to awakening by sound when asleep," explained study co-author Dr. Mark S...

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids take their cues from mom and dad, so it only makes sense to participate with them when teaching them the merits of exercise.

Couch potato kids are a real concern. The College of New Jersey exercise science professor Avery Faigenbaum defined the term exercise-deficit disorder -- or EDD -- to draw attention to our children's shortfall when ...

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nations that officially frown upon hitting kids as a form of punishment appear to have teens who are less prone to violence, new research suggests.

In countries that have a complete ban on corporal punishment (spanking and slapping), the rates of physical fighting among teens are as much as 69 percent lower than in countries without such a ban...

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Wellness Library Results - 236

The bond between parents and babies is one of the strongest forces in nature. Romances come and go, but once you've fallen for your baby, you're hooked for life. Jen Harrington of South Riding, Virginia, felt the rush the instant she looked at her new son. People had warned her that she was about to fall in love as never before, but she didn't know what they meant until Joshua came along. "It was ...

With his 2-year-old upstairs taking a nap, Tim Anderson* seized the chance to do some yard work. A few moments later, he was bewildered to find the toddler lying on the lawn, crying inconsolably. That's odd, he thought: How did he get downstairs so fast? Then, to his horror, he noticed a window screen lying beside his son. Alone in his room, the enterprising tot had managed to push out the screen ...

Before you reach your third trimester, you should be thinking about registering for a childbirth education class. Like most prospective parents, you're probably apprehensive about labor, delivery, and your first days with your new baby. The courses are an excellent way to prepare yourself and your partner for childbirth -- psychologically, emotionally, and practically. If you possibly can, attend...

Expectant parents can be forgiven if they panic when they hear the word "bonding." Library shelves and Web sites are devoted to the importance of bonding with a newborn and the trauma that may result when it doesn't take place. Many parents now fear that if they don't bond immediately, their children may be scarred for life. No wonder the issue has wrought so much stress. Studies in the last two d...

What is Lyme disease? Lyme disease is an infection that your child can get if he's bitten by a tick carrying certain bacteria. Doctors call it the "great imitator" because it mimics other diseases, making it difficult to diagnose; in addition, a blood test can't confirm it until about three weeks following the bite. Left untreated, the infection can develop into a serious long-lasting illness th...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, you want to show him his behavior is unacceptable and must change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages you don't want to send:

What is swimmer's ear? It's an ear infection that kids and adults commonly get by swimming in a pool or lake. Water seeps into the ear canal and erodes its protective lining, making it easier for bacteria and fungi to take hold and multiply. Any infection of the external ear -- that is, in or near the ear canal, as opposed to the middle ear -- is categorized as swimmer's ear. How could my child ...

Why does my child have tantrums? Some preschoolers throw tantrums for the same reasons they did as toddlers: because they're exhausted, hungry, or scared. But at this age it's more likely because your child wants to test your authority or manipulate you. This isn't a knock on your parenting skills or a sign that he'll be a rebellious teenager; it's a normal part of his development and growing ind...

How can I stop my child from teasing? The short answer is you can't. Every child teases, from the peekaboo of infancy to the "I'm going to get you!" round-the-sofa chases of early childhood. But you can stop your child from teasing too much or too harshly. Try giving your child these simple dos and don'ts:

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? The best course is to help him develop his emotional intelligence (loosely defined as the ability to cope with one's own feelings as well as those of others). This will enable him to sense when his teasing is mean-spirited, hostile, or simply inappropriate. Here are some tips:

A few hundred years ago, doctors believed baby teeth could be deadly. In one year alone in 19th-century England, more than 5,000 babies supposedly died of teething. Today, we know that teething isn't really dangerous. New teeth can make your baby cranky and uncomfortable, but the misery will soon pass. Here's what you need to know to help both of you get through this trying time. How can I tell ...

What causes allergies? Every human body carries an arsenal of chemicals to fight off bacteria, viruses, and other intruders, but sometimes these weapons backfire. If your child has allergies, she responds to things in the environment that are not invaders. The body produces antibodies, and when your child is exposed to the irritant a second time, her body releases a number of chemicals. One of th...

Why does my child bite her nails? Nail biting is one of the somewhat misnamed "nervous habits," which also include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. But anxiety is only one reason children bite their nails; your child might be doing so for a number of other reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit....

How do I know when my child's ready? Boys tend to stay in diapers longer than girls, but most children are ready to potty-train sometime between their second and third birthdays. There's enormous variation, though: Some children train themselves when they're about 18-months-old, while others show no interest until after their fourth birthday. To figure out if it's time to start the process, ask ...

Why does my child bite her nails? Your child may bite her nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. Nail biting is most common in high-strung and spirited children, tends...

You're trying not to worry, but your child's third birthday is behind him -- and maybe his fourth or fifth -- and he's still in diapers. Don't despair. Learning to use the toilet is a skill much like learning to tie shoes or ride a bicycle, and it poses a different set of challenges for each child. Here are seven common problems and strategies for solving them. My child refuses to use the toilet...

Why does my child bite his nails? Children bite their nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. (None of these necessarily signals anxiety, so "nervous habits" is somethi...

Should I be worried that my toddler sucks his pacifier all the time? No. For children between the ages of 1 and 3, sucking on a thumb or pacifier is natural. It can help your child with new challenges, such as sleeping through the night, eating with the family, and going on a long car ride. Sucking is a life skill that your child began in the womb and perfected as an infant. As he becomes a todd...

Do I need a contract when I hire a nanny? No, but it's a good idea to go through the process of drawing one up. If you're an easygoing type and your nanny seems agreeable, you might not want to bother with writing a formal agreement that could bring prickly issues to the surface. But you and your nanny (and your partner, if you have one) really should have a conversation about the ground rules of...

Should I be worried that my 3-year-old won't go anywhere without his pacifier? No, but it's probably not too early to begin encouraging your child to be less dependent on it. Most children stop using pacifiers between the ages of 2 and 4, but many stop well before that. You can always force your child to do without his "binky" by taking it away. But you're much better off persuading him that giv...

Why does my toddler need a nap? Most 2- to 3-year-olds need 12 to 13 hours of sleep a day -- and it's a rare child who will stack them all together. Trying to adjust a child's schedule so she does may cause nighttime sleep problems, since being overtired can cause her to become hyperactive. How many naps does she need, and how long should I let her sleep? Most kids give up their morning nap by...

To ease the pressure you naturally feel about finding the most nurturing and safe environment for your child, it's smart to begin your search for daycare early. Make your first inquiries about six months before your child will start attending. In some areas you may need to get on the case even earlier. You can use this set of questions as a guide when you sit down to discuss a center's program w...

There are things we just don't talk about in polite company. There are subjects one doesn't broach at the dinner table. Take bodily vermin, for example. A few months ago, I couldn't have pictured myself sipping a post-prandial cup of coffee and Sambuca at a friend's house, chitchatting about the efficacy of various techniques for ridding one's household of lice and their dastardly offspring, nits,...

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

What should I do if my child breaks a bone or dislocates a joint? A broken bone or dislocated joint is a serious injury that requires a doctor's immediate attention. The best thing you can do is protect the injured area, making sure your child doesn't worsen the damage. Fractures are breaks, cracks, or chips in a bone. A fractured bone that pierces through the skin is called an open fracture. ...

If you're preparing for an international adoption, you're probably knee-deep in paperwork, waiting to be matched, or scheduling a flight for China, Russia, India, or another country to meet your new son or daughter for the first time. With all the excitement, medical tests for your child after you return home may be the last thing on your mind. But once you get home, it should be high on your li...

What are mumps? Caused by a virus that infects the salivary glands near the jawbone, mumps is a highly contagious illness that shows up mainly in swelling and soreness in the jaw area. The swelling is usually on both sides, so that the sufferer bears a passing resemblance to a chipmunk. In some cases, though, one side may puff up several days before the other. Your child may run a fever and compl...

Consider the standards used to diagnose oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and you may think they could describe any kid on a bad day -- and almost any teenager almost every day: They argue with adults, deliberately annoy people, defy rules, and have high fits of temper. All these activities are all-too-familiar to parents. The distinction lies in the frequency and intensity of the behavior. F...

Why does my child interrupt me so often? Small children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exists for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before he forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore the very concept of interrupting makes no sense to your toddler....

Why does my child constantly interrupt me? Until they reach the age of 3 or 4, children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exist for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before she forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore, the very concept of interruptin...

Why does my child interrupt all the time? Interrupting comes naturally to children because they tend to forget that other people have needs that are as important (or almost, at least) as theirs. Even if your child knows that she's supposed to wait for a pause in the conversation and say, "Excuse me," the protocol slips her mind because what she has to say feels so urgent at that moment. Your ch...

Ever wonder where kids get so much energy? Today's typical 5-year-old eats almost 600,000 calories each year -- that's a lot of fuel for a small body. These vast reserves of energy come in handy for games of freeze tag and neighborhood bike races. But many kids barely tap into their supply. It doesn't take many calories to watch Power Rangers, sort Pokemon cards, or play Crash Bandicoot on the Nin...

Almost all new dads discover amazing talents in the first few days of fatherhood. But even the toughest guys can be afraid of babies -- especially their own. As soon as a first-time father carries his newborn through the front door, his life opens up to brand-new worries, doubts, and insecurities. Even before he unwraps that first diaper, his life has changed forever. Larry McGrail, a registered...

So you've heard great things about the magic of time-out -- the disciplinary tactic of removing a misbehaving child from the action for a dose of quiet time -- only it seems to have no effect on your little one? Here's guidance on how to resolve the five most common problems faced by parents who try time-out with a toddler. My child just ignores me. If your 1- or 2-year-old looks at you blankl...

Every once in a while, when you're at your wit's end, you give your child a time-out, but it never seems to work. Maybe he throws a tantrum or refuses to sit still and goes running through the house. Don't give up. Time-out -- checking misbehavior by removing your child from his current situation for a few minutes of quiet time -- is one of the most effective strategies in the parental game plan. ...

When your child acts up, often the best way to nip the behavior in the bud is to remove him from the activity at hand and give him some quiet time alone. This technique, known as time-out, is a great, nonviolent way to shape behavior. But the key to success is knowing the right time and way to introduce it. Here are six secrets to making the technique work. Understand what time-out is -- and isn...

Time-out is a method of checking misbehavior by removing your child from her current situation for a few minutes of quiet time. It's a great way to help your child calm down and regroup. Between the ages of 3 and 6, children are intensively learning rules and testing limits. Time-out can be particularly useful in establishing these, as long as you apply it consistently. Here are eight ways to make...

When teenagers go job hunting, they often have just one thing in mind: money -- money for dates, college, or even their family's rent and groceries. They aren't worried about long-term job security or climbing the career ladder. And for the most part, they don't even think about job safety. They're young and invincible, and nobody would give them an unsafe job... right? Wrong. Job safety may be n...

Greg Bellisime gets envious comments when he talks about the five weeks he took off after the birth of his daughter, Beatrice. Even after his time off, he returned to work only three days a week, saving most of his week to care for his wife and daughter. Bellisime, a 35-year-old inventory manager for Patagonia outdoor clothing company in Ventura, California, wanted to make sure his wife was recupe...

Before your baby is born, you should take time to make the great diaper decision: cloth or disposable? Both types have pluses and minuses, and neither option is clearly superior. Most parents today opt for disposable diapers, but some parents continue to swear by old-fashioned cloth. You may even go for a combination: cloth diapers at home and disposable when you go out. If you haven't already mad...

What is croup? Croup is a common childhood infection marked by labored breathing and hoarse coughing. It's most likely to show up in toddlers, but it can occur at any age. Croup usually begins as a respiratory infection, and a child may have a runny nose for several days before beginning to cough. If your child has croup, her airways will probably become sore and swollen, making it hard for her ...

At one time or another, almost every child will refuse to take a pill or swig of medicinal syrup. Here are some tips to help the medicine go down:

  • Be honest. Do not tell your child that the medicine is candy (he might suddenly crave a handful). Instead, explain that the medicine is very important and that you will find some way to help him to take it.
  • If liquids are the only opt...

What is diaper rash? By the time your child reaches the toddler years, you've probably already seen your share of diaper rashes: red, inflamed skin hiding under the diaper or training pants. The rash -- usually found in the genital area, the inner thighs, or the buttocks -- can be either dry or moist. Sometimes the rash looks pimply, making the expression "smooth as a baby's bottom" seem like a ...

How can I tell if my child's too sick for daycare? It's not always easy. Obviously you don't want your kid to pass a phlegmy cough along to all his pals, but it's a much harder call when he has nothing more than a runny nose. In general, you shouldn't bring your child to daycare if the illness is contagious and could do anything more than make any youngster a little cranky. Here are some spe...

What is a middle ear infection? A middle ear infection is simply an invasion of viruses or bacteria into the small space that lies just beyond the eardrum. The germs usually stage the assault while a child is recovering from a cold or flu, ailments that leave her ears partly clogged with fluids and create an ideal habitat for microbes. As the infection takes hold, the middle ear fills with pus, a...

What's the measles vaccine rash? It's a rash that shows up in about 5 percent of people vaccinated for measles (rubeola). The rash looks a bit like the one caused by the disease itself: red dots on the chest and neck. These may occasionally become raised bumps and in rare cases may spread to the rest of your child's body. The rash usually appears about 10 days after your child was vaccinated, but...

The only thing working parents dread hearing more than the words "I feel bad" from one of their kids is an early-morning phone call bringing the news that their nanny is ill. Instead of praying it won't happen and going into a panic when it does, make a plan. What are the options when I can't use my usual childcare? Backup options generally fall into one of two main categories: finding someone...

How can I make sure my child feels ready for daycare or preschool? For starters, remember that both you and your child will need time to get used to the new setup. Try to be patient; even if you make every effort to prepare your child, it will probably be a few days before she comes skipping over to you at pick-up time, more eager to show you her art project than to go home. Here are some tips...

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