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Doctors at one Ohio hospital system have discovered yet another possible consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: More cases of "broken heart syndrome."

The condition -- which doctors call stress cardiomyopathy -- appears similar to a heart attack, with symptoms such as chest pain and breathlessness. But its cause is different: Experts believe it reflects a temporary weakness in the hear...

If you've been keeping a healthy distance from other people because of COVID-19, you probably feel smart. But if you're also feeling lonely and stressed, it doesn't mean anything is wrong. It could simply mean you're human.

The need to be around people is hard-wired into our brains, researchers say. We crave company in the same way we hunger for food or thirst for water. When that cravi...

Older adults with healthy hearts probably would benefit from taking a cholesterol-lowering statin, a new study contends.

People 75 and older who were free of heart disease and prescribed a statin wound up with a 25% lower risk of death from any cause and a 20% lower risk of heart-related death, researchers reported July 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association...

At her new job as a nurse at a college in St. Louis, Roslyn Harvey spent most of her day sitting at a desk. So, when she felt breathless walking across campus or climbing stairs, she figured she was out of shape.

To get fit, she started walking 15-20 minutes on a treadmill before work. Then one evening, Roslyn came home from work so exhausted she dozed off while sitting at her kitchen t...

TUESDAY, July 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Deep sleep is essential for good health, and too little of it may shorten your life, a new study suggests.

REM (rapid eye movement) sleep is when dreams occur and the body repairs itself from the ravages of the day. For every 5% reduction in REM sleep, mortality rates increase 13% to 17% among older and middle-aged adults, resear...

Even after undergoing the artery-clearing procedure angioplasty, Black patients with heart disease are more likely than whites to suffer a heart attack or die within the next several years.

That's the conclusion of a new analysis of 10 clinical trials: On balance, both Black and Hispanic patients fared worse after angioplasty, versus white patients. And that was particularly true for ...

Nearly one-third of excess deaths in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States were linked to causes other than COVID-19, but that doesn't mean that the virus didn't play a role in those deaths, a new study claims.

The researchers found there were just over 87,000 excess deaths in the United States between March 1 and April 25. Excess deaths are those above the...

Too much added sugar can pile on dangerous fat around your heart and in your abdomen, a new study finds.

"When we consume too much sugar, the excess is converted to fat and stored," said researcher So Yun Yi, a Ph.D. student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health.

"This fat tissue located around the heart and in the abdomen releases chemicals into the bod...

Wildfire smoke has an almost immediate harmful effect on the heart and lungs, researchers say.

Using data from wildfire seasons between 2010 and 2015 in British Columbia, Canada, the researchers linked exposure to elevated levels of fine particles in smoke with ambulance dispatches for heart and lung conditions. Dispatches rose within an hour of exposure to wildfire smoke, the investi...

Long-term exposure to fine particle air pollution is a major risk factor for heart disease and death, but even small reductions in pollution levels can reduce the threat, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 157,000 adults, aged 35 to 70, in 21 countries.

Between 2003 and 2018, more than 9,100 people had heart disease events, including more than 4,000 ...

Over a lifetime, women who've had a preterm delivery have a higher risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

The findings point to the fact that doctors should include a woman's reproductive history in assessments of heart disease risk, according to the researchers.

"Preterm delivery should now be recognized as an independent risk factor for IHD [ischemic heart disease] ...

Smoking is terrible for your heart and lungs, and simply switching to e-cigarettes won't do much good, a major new analysis finds.

That's especially true now amid the COVID-19 pandemic, experts added.

The only truly healthy way out for nicotine addicts is quitting, said a team led by Thomas Münzel, a cardiologist at University Medical Center in Mainz, Germany. His team...

Replacing air filters, installing smoke detectors, weatherizing windows, repairing rotting floors. It's maintenance that can make a house healthier and safer and reduce utility costs.

Volunteers with the Hinton Rural Life Center in North Carolina are tackling these household tasks to help fellow residents in rural Appalachia who don't have the financial means or physical ability to keep...

Just as the coronavirus pandemic strains states and the nation, it also has stressed the resources of neighborhoods and individuals.

And those with fewer resources to spare are clearly faring worse.

An analysis from the newspaper USA Today found that among the nation's poorest neighborhoods, where median household income is less than $35,000, COVID-19 infection was twice as comm...

With the arrival of warm weather, and as states begin to loosen months of lockdown restrictions from the coronavirus pandemic, it's only natural that people are itching to get outside.

But what summer activities are safe during a pandemic? And with many air-conditioned movie theaters, libraries, restaurants and malls closed or limiting the number of visitors, where can people go to cool...

A new study finds that 1 in 5 people under age 40 now have metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the odds for many serious conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The rate of metabolic syndrome is rising in all age groups -- as many as half of adults over 60 have it. But among 20- to 39-year-olds, the rate rose 5 percentage points over f...

Heather Lister was 28 when her cardiologist said, "If you're planning to have children, you shouldn't wait long."

The problem was her heart. Instead of being born with three leaflets on her aortic valve, she only had two. The older you are during pregnancy and childbirth, the greater the strain on the heart, he told her.

This was the first time she'd heard that diagnosis. But sh...

About one in 10 heart surgery patients who is prescribed an opioid painkiller after the procedure still uses the drugs more than 90 days later, a new study finds.

And those prescribed the highest doses are most likely to be long-term users of opioids, researchers say.

"Our findings support a much-needed shift toward decreasing opioid dosages at discharge and using alternativ...

A mainstay of 18th-century medicine -- the lowly leech -- has made something of a comeback in the 21st century. That's largely due to powerful blood thinners the parasitic worm secretes naturally.

Now, genetic research could give a major boost to the medical use of leeches, scientists say.

An international team sequenced the genome of a European leech called Hirudo medici...

One of the drugs championed by President Donald Trump as a potential "game changer" in the coronavirus pandemic led to a potentially deadly heart rhythm disorder in a 84-year-old woman treated for COVID-19, according to a new report.

Doctors said her condition improved once they discontinued the drug, chloroquine.

Chloroquine and the related drug hydroxychloroquine are comm...

Heart disease is on the rise among cancer patients and survivors, but they're less likely than people without cancer to be prescribed medicines to protect their heart, a new study finds.

Heart disease has become a leading cause of long-term preventable death in cancer survivors, according to the study published June 16 as a research letter in the journal JACC: CardioOncology.<...

People who drink large amounts of alcohol have nearly fivefold odds of experiencing a potentially deadly type of stroke compared with those who drink very little or not at all, a new study finds.

But researchers didn't rely on people to self-report how much alcohol they consumed. Rather, they looked at blood concentrations of phosphatidylethanol (PEth), a biomarker reflecting alcohol co...

About 1 in 5 people worldwide has a least one underlying health condition that puts them at increased risk of severe COVID-19 illness, researchers say.

While the analysis of data from 188 countries suggests that 22% of the world's population, or 1.7 billion people, might need additional protective measures, not all people with underlying conditions will develop severe COVID-19 ill...

Sticking with a healthy diet can lower your risk for stroke and heart attack, a new study suggests.

"Although each healthy eating pattern represents a different combination of dietary constituents, our study indicates that greater adherence to any of the four healthy eating patterns we looked at is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and the health benefits persist...

Yonas Michael didn't know what to think when his younger brother, Daniel, kept saying he felt "funny."

"It's like I can really feel my heartbeat," Daniel told him.

The brothers didn't think much of it at first. Yonas was studying for a master's degree in education at Iowa State University and Daniel had joined him from their childhood home in Maryland.

"He was t...

If you can't sleep well at night, the problem may be rooted in hardened arteries, a new study suggests.

"We've discovered that fragmented sleep is associated with a unique pathway -- chronic circulating inflammation throughout the bloodstream -- which, in turn, is linked to higher amounts of plaques in coronary arteries," said researcher Matthew Walker. He's a professor of psychology...

Everyone has it. It's been known about for hundreds of years. But only recently have scientists begun to unravel its mysteries.

It has an unwieldly name: epicardial adipose tissue, or EAT. But researchers are learning how this pocket of fat beneath the outer lining of the heart plays a dynamic role in heart health. Like a cardiac version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, EAT sometimes serves ...

Someone collapses with a cardiac arrest nearby -- in the COVID-19 era, do you dare to assist?

Here's some reassuring -- and potentially lifesaving -- news: You're at low risk for coronavirus infection if you perform CPR on someone in cardiac arrest, new research shows.

CPR can save the lives of people who suffer cardiac arrest in a public place. But concerns have been raised...

In the early 1960s, pediatrician Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki saw more and more children suffering from persistent fevers, bumpy rashes and more unsightly, uncomfortable symptoms. So he began stashing their records in a special file. He labeled it with the Japanese equivalent of "GOK."

"GOK," he later told English-speaking friends, "stood for 'God Only Knows.'"

Once he had 50 cases, Ka...

Breanna Alosi and her family were taking it easy on a Sunday afternoon when the 33-year-old mother felt a pain in her upper back. She wondered if she'd moved wrong while lifting her 8-month-old son, Hunter. Her husband told her to go lie down, so she took her 3-year-old daughter, Makenna, for a nap.

Breanna couldn't help looking up her symptoms on her phone. Heart attack popped up. No w...

Women who have a stroke are far more likely to be treated with clot-busting drugs than they used to be, new research shows.

In the early 2000s, women suffering a stroke were 30% less likely than men to get clot-busting treatment, also known as thrombolysis. Recently, the gap has narrowed to 13%.

The researchers reached that conclusion by pooling data from 24 studies...

Women with heart defects experience far more cardiovascular problems during pregnancy than those without, yet only half get a recommended test to assess their heart health before giving birth, according to new research.

The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, found that during pregnancy, women with congenita...

Knowing how much older adults exercise can predict their odds of developing heart disease or dying early, a new study suggests.

Asking patients during atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) screening about their levels of exercise can help start treatment sooner, researchers say.

"With people now living longer, there is a growing need to determine how we can best detect latent...

Current federal law requiring restaurants to post calories on their menus would help diners make healthier choices and could ultimately lead to fewer cases of heart disease and diabetes, according to new research.

Between 2018 and 2023, the public's response to the nutritional labels at restaurants could prevent 14,698 cases of cardiovascular diseases, including 1,575 deaths and 21,522 ...

Whether pot use increases the risk of stroke has been hotly debated, and now a new study adds to evidence that it doesn't.

"Our observational study looked specifically at recent cannabis use by reviewing drug testing data for people admitted to the hospital. While more research is needed with larger numbers of people, our study lends support to the studies showing that cannabis use do...

An inherited disorder that causes high cholesterol early in life appears to affect about 25 million people worldwide, but it is especially common among people with cardiovascular disease, new research suggests.

The findings, published Friday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, "make a strong case" for screening programs to identify familial hypercholesterolemia early,...

Could a higher power help stroke recovery? People who are spiritual may be better able to deal with stroke-related disability, new research suggests.

The Italian study linked spirituality -- be it through religion or simply a strong sense of purpose and connection to others -- to a lower risk of depression for people with low to moderate disability after a stroke and their caregivers...

Music influences people's heart rates, and one piece of music will affect individuals' hearts differently, a new, small study shows.

The findings could lead to novel, drug-free treatments for such conditions as high blood pressure and heart rhythm disorders, or to help people relax or stay alert, the researchers said.

Previous studies that examined physical responses to musi...

Weighing in at about the same as when he graduated high school, Brian Muscarella, 62, eats a healthy diet and enjoys plenty of physical activity. Indeed, he has completed the New York City Marathon four times.

But at 53, Muscarella's life changed dramatically when he had a spinal stroke, which accounts for just over 1% of all strokes.

"I had great blood work, I was in shape,...

High blood pressure is one of the top risk factors for heart attack and stroke. It's also common among people who develop severe symptoms of COVID-19.

So, with more people at home practicing social distancing and with fewer chances to check blood pressure at public pharmacy machines or doctor visits, it's more important than ever to know how to do it at home.

How do I se...

Since marrying in 2002, Doug Behan and Lise Deguire have gone on safari in Tanzania, watched the sunset over the Santorini caldera in the Greek Islands and walked through the ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru.

And those are just a few of their annual excursions. "It's on my bucket list that I want to visit every continent," Deguire said.

Early this year, the Yardley, Pennsylvania, c...

Hyvelle Ferguson-Davis was reviewing paperwork at her office in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, when the headache started. It grew stronger and stronger and her eyes blurred, making it difficult to read. She hoped she wasn't coming down with something.

After work, Ferguson-Davis, then 41, drove home with a still-pounding headache. She was too busy to get sick, she told herself. Most immediate...

Multiple sclerosis can cause weakness, pain, fatigue and vision problems. The disease also appears to increase the odds of heart disease and stroke, new research suggests.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system disorder that can affect movement. The British study found that people with MS were nearly one-third more likely to have "macrovascular disease." Those are condit...

U.S. emergency rooms are seeing about half as many heart attack patients as usual -- and researchers suspect the new coronavirus is the reason why.

It's not that fewer people are having heart attacks, doctors say. Rather, it's fear of getting COVID-19 keeping people from hospitals.

And the consequences can be deadly.

"I'm certainly not convinced that the true rat...

It's a myth that heart attacks are a "man's disease." Yet a new research review confirms that women remain less likely than men to get medications routinely recommended for preventing heart trouble and strokes.

Researchers found that across 43 international studies, a general pattern emerged: Women with risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely than men to be prescrib...

Every weeknight in April, Charley Bednarsh flung open the windows of her fifth-floor apartment across from the World Trade Center. At 7 p.m., she'd lean out, bang a metal spoon against a pan and shout with joy as part of the chorus of New Yorkers saluting health care workers fighting the coronavirus.

With the kids below cranking their noisemakers, another neighbor blowing his trumpet an...

Preventing heart disease may protect you from dementia, researchers say.

The new study looked at nearly 1,600 people, at an average age of 79.5, who were followed for 21 years. Their heart disease risk was assessed at the outset, and participants had annual memory and thinking tests.

The takeaway: People with a higher risk of heart disease also had greater mental (cognitive)...

Almost every adult will face this health problem as they get older. But knowing how blood pressure might change over a lifetime can give people a better appreciation of why it's important to keep it in check at any age.

When left uncontrolled or if undetected, high blood pressure can lead to heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease or other major health problems.

"Pr...

Low-income Americans are much less likely to be screened for heart disease or to receive counseling about controlling risk factors, a new study finds.

Heart health screenings -- such as regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks -- and counseling to improve diet, increase exercise or quit smoking play important roles in reducing heart disease risk.

Income has long been as...

An agonizing headache jolted Whitney Spotts awake in the middle of the night.

She hoped she wasn't getting sick because she was enjoying a rare long weekend with her husband, Eric, and their 18-month-old daughter.

The following day, Whitney stayed in bed with excruciating pain behind her forehead. Later she started vomiting.

It was probably a bad case of the flu, thought...

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