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The brain damage that may occur in football players has received a lot of attention in recent years. But a new study suggests that former players who get a diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) when they're still alive may well be getting the wrong diagnosis.

CTE can only be diagnosed with an autopsy, the researchers explained. Other conditions could cause the symptoms ...

Less than half of patients with a sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover within two weeks, new research shows.

"This study challenges current perceptions that most people with a sports-related mTBI recover within 10 to 14 days," said lead author Dr. Stephen Kara, from Axis Sports Medicine in Auckland, New Zealand.

He and his colleagues analyzed recovery ...

Padded helmets and safe tackling and blocking techniques can reduce the chance of head injuries for middle school football players, a new study finds.

Young athletes make up 70% of America's amateur and pro football players. As head injuries in older athletes have been linked to a slew of brain injuries, attention is now turning to the safety of the younger players.

Robe...

Hitting the slopes or the skating rink as the winter of 2020 winds down? Don't let an accident or injury spoil your fun.

"Winter sports and recreational activities have great health and cardiovascular benefits," said Dr. Joseph Bosco, vice president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). "However, it's important not to underestimate the risks that cold weather can br...

A gene mutation implicated in the risk for Alzheimer's disease might also impair memory in soccer players who head the ball a lot, a new study suggests.

The finding could have implications for young athletes in contact sports where the head can take hits during play.

Among soccer players who headed the ball the most, those with the gene mutation called the apolipoprotein E ...

On college campuses in the United States, students suffer concussions twice as often as believed, and most of those injuries occur off the playing field, new research from the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests.

"This study shows how common head injuries are among this population and that concussions are not restricted to the athletic field," said study co-author Dr. John Brec...

Talking and texting on your smartphone is a big no-no for drivers, but new research suggests the same should be true for pedestrians.

According to one database, more than 2,500 men and women went to an emergency room for head and neck injuries sustained while using a smartphone between 1998 and 2017. When that number is extrapolated to include the whole country, the total is likely to...

More bicyclists on the road make cycling safer, but head and face injuries still occur, a new study finds.

From 2008 to 2017, even as the number of bike riders increased, the number of head and face injuries stayed steady, according to researchers from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

"We believe this may be due to a safety-in-numbers phenomenon, whereby increased public...

When a loved one shows signs of dementia, sometimes a head injury is the cause and MRI scans can help prevent a misdiagnosis of Alzheimer's, researchers report.

As many as 21% of older adults with dementia may be misdiagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a previous study found. Up to 40% of dementias are caused by conditions other than Alzheimer's disease, according to the Alzhei...

Former professional soccer players have a significantly increased risk of death from brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, a new study finds.

Former soccer players were about 3.5 times more likely to die of neurodegenerative diseases than people in the general population, according to a study in Scotland.

"This analysis revealed that risk ranged from a fivefold...

Many brain injury deaths could be prevented by using an inexpensive drug in the critical hours following a head trauma, a new international study finds.

"Traumatic brain injury can happen to anyone at any time, whether it's through an incident like a car crash or simply falling down the stairs," said study co-leader Ian Roberts, a professor of clinical trials at the London School of H...

New research on concussions reports mixed news for kids playing high school sports.

The good news? Concussions are down during football practices. And the number of recurrent concussions is down in all sports.

The bad news? Concussions are on the rise during high school football games, and football continues to have the highest concussion rates in high school sports.

...

Cases of deadly melanomas on the head and neck rose more than 51% over two decades among young people in the United States and Canada, a new study reports.

Researchers found that the incidence of head and neck melanoma rose nearly 4% a year from 1995 to 2001, and 1.2% a year from 2001 to 2014 in children and young adults.

Using data from a North American cancer r...

Girls who suffer a concussion while playing school sports are more likely than boys to delay seeking specialty medical care, which can worsen their symptoms and prolong recovery, researchers warn.

That's the upshot from a study of 192 athletes between the ages of 7 and 18.

Senior author Dr. Christina Master said researchers have speculated that teen girls with concussions h...

Only about one in five U.S. adults and one in 10 children and teens who suffered head and neck injuries in cycling crashes said they wore a helmet, a new study finds.

An analysis of data from more than 76,000 cyclists nationwide who experienced such injuries between 2002 and 2012 found that only 21% of men, 28% of women and 12% of younger riders had been wearing a helmet.<...

The risk of suicide among U.S. military veterans who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is more than double that of other vets, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed records of more than 1.4 million vets who received care from the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) between 2005 and 2015.

They compared severity of the traumatic brain injury with diagnoses o...

Drinking and driving an electric scooter doesn't mix, according to a new study.

Researchers reported serious injuries like brain bleeding or fractures that have happened while riding an electric scooter (e-scooter). Alcohol and drugs were a factor in many of these crashes.

"E-scooters may look like fun and games, but it's a vehicle. It's a motor attached to wheels, and you n...

The length of time that NFL players are sidelined after a concussion has tripled in the past two decades, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2012-2015 pro football seasons. They found that the players who suffered a concussion returned to play an average of 19 days later, which means they missed about 1.5 games.

Data collected between 1996 and 2001 showed ...

Concussions are bad news for the brain, but what about the less damaging hits to the head that are the nuts and bolts of contact sports? Do they also pose a threat?

The brain scans of 38 college football players suggest the answer is yes.

Over the course of a single season, the players collectively absorbed almost 20,000 hits. Only two of those were actually concussions. Yet...

Just how dangerous is American football?

Pretty dangerous, a new analysis claims.

Repeated exposure to head trauma during play often causes significant brain damage, researchers report. That damage then gives rise to neurological disease, which then boosts the risk for dementia by the time players reach middle-age and beyond.

The conclusion follows autopsies perfor...

Even a mild concussion can temporarily affect your sense of smell and trigger longer-term anxiety problems, a new study finds.

It's been known that such problems could occur after a major concussion. But this study found it's also true for minor concussions caused by accidents such as falling off a bike with a helmet on, having a traffic fender-bender, falling on the ski slopes, or sl...

Falls from beds, uneven floors and playing football are leading causes of nonfatal brain injuries in American kids, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on traumatic brain injuries among kids and teens treated at emergency departments of 66 U.S. hospitals between 2010 and 2013.

Of those cases, 72% were attributable to products regulated by the U....

College athletes with attention- deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be slower to recover from a concussion and may have more severe symptoms.

That's the preliminary conclusion of a study of 120 U.S. college athletes who suffered concussions. Forty had ADHD; 80 did not. Of those with ADHD, half were taking stimulant medications for the disorder.

All were evaluated befo...

Brian Duncan doesn't know why his brain still works as well as it does.

Duncan, 67, got his bell rung more than once during his life -- as a professional football player, an amateur boxer and a bull rider at Texas rodeos.

He remembers one time he got slammed into the ground by L.C. Greenwood, a 6-foot, 6-inch defensive end for the Pittsburgh Steelers, so hard that he halluci...

It can look like a less strenuous sport than football or soccer, but professional baseball players might be the healthiest athletes out there, a new study finds.

Athletes in Major League Baseball (MLB) tend to live about 24% longer than the average American guy, according to a century's worth of mortality rates among nearly 10,500 pro baseball players.

What's more, baseb...

A vast majority of battered women have suffered head injuries that are hard to recover from, a new study suggests.

Eighty-one percent of women who've suffered domestic abuse and sought help have suffered a head injury and 83% have been strangled, researchers discovered.

"One in 3 women in the United States has experienced intimate partner violence. What we found leads us...

Certain high school and college athletes require a longer-than-normal recovery period after a concussion. Researchers say blood tests can predict which ones.

"With so many people sustaining concussions and a sizable number of them having prolonged symptoms and recovery, any tools we can develop to help determine who would be at greater risk of problems would be very beneficial, so the...

Concussions aren't only a concern for high school and college athletes -- they're also a leading injury risk for kids as young as age 5 who play sports.

That's the upshot of a new study of injury risk among 1,500 elementary school athletes in one Florida county. For the study, University of South Florida researchers focused on 5- to 11-year-olds who play recreational football, soccer...

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many American kids don't don helmets when biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a troubling new poll finds.

Among more than 1,300 parents surveyed, 18% said their kids never wear helmets while biking, 58% said their kids don't wear helmets while skateboarding, and 61% said their children don't wear helmets when riding scooters...

All it takes is two hours of training to save a life after a severe head injury, researchers say.

A new study reports that training first responders in emergency treatment guidelines for severe head injuries does improve chances of survival.

The guidelines for pre-hospital care of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients by EMS workers focus on preventing low oxygen, low blood ...

High levels of a protein linked with the brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) were found in the cerebrospinal fluid of ex-athletes who suffered multiple concussions, Canadian researchers say.

The protein tau has been tied to CTE, a rare, degenerative brain disease believed to stem from repeated impacts to the head. People with CTE develop symptoms such as dementia, per...

When NFL legend Frank Gifford died in 2015 at the age of 84, his family revealed that for years he'd suffered from mental issues caused by chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), tied to head trauma experienced during his years of play.

CTE was also thought to contribute to the suicide of retired NFL great Junior Seau at the age of 43.

But there's long been one tough issue w...

Scientists have developed a way to grow live bone using a rib and a 3-D mold in animal studies, and they say their technique could offer a new way to treat severe head and facial injuries.

The technique was tested in sheep. First, the researchers made a rectangular defect in the animal's jaw. Then they printed out an implantable mold and spacer made of bone cement.

They atta...

There's good news and bad news from a new study of children visiting U.S. emergency departments for head injuries: The rate of these potentially serious events has fallen among boys, but risen for girls.

In recent years, the danger of concussion from contact sports -- most notably football -- has garnered much media attention. So the authors of the new report theorized that new "safet...

The number of people living with Parkinson's disease worldwide could double in the next two decades, experts project.

In a report warning of a possible Parkinson's "pandemic," researchers say the stage is set for cases to surge to 12 million or more by 2040.

What's to blame? In large part, trends that are generally positive: Older age is a major risk factor for Parkinson's, ...

There's more evidence that football may be changing the brains of adolescent players, and not in a good way.

In a new study, researchers looked at MRI scans of 26 football-playing boys averaging 12 years of age.

Comparing MRIs taken just before the football season and then three months after, the scans revealed that the boys had changes in an important area of the brain cal...

High-impact hits may affect the brain development of children and teens after just one season of football, preliminary research suggests.

The study compared functional MRI scans taken pre- and post-season. The researchers saw more gray matter volume in those who had high-impact hits -- but no concussions -- over the season.

More gray matter indicates that the brain might ...

The long-term effects of head injuries in football players begin at a young age, a new study finds.

Researchers tested college football players' blood for concussion markers and found that they had elevated levels of these markers before the season even started.

"It was quite shocking to learn that the biomarkers were high before they were even involved in one hit or tackle ...

People who have experienced either a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury are twice as likely to commit suicide than others, a new review suggests.

The analysis also indicates that men and women who have had a concussion are also more likely to consider or attempt suicide.

The investigators stressed that the absolute risk of suicide for any one concussion patient rema...

It may be possible to use a blood test to diagnose and manage athletes' concussions, but the results could vary by race and gender, researchers report.

In the new study, investigators analyzed the blood of college athletes and found that levels of certain proteins and peptides ("biomarkers") were higher in those who'd suffered a concussion than in those who were concussion-free.

...

Athletes may be less likely to suffer concussions if they carry a gene linked to the learning disorder dyslexia, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the concussion history of 87 football players at Penn State University. They also checked the players for certain genes.

The findings suggest that "genotype may play a role in your susceptibility for getting a concussion...

Repeated hits to the head, rather than one severe blow, may determine whether football players suffer a concussion, a new study suggests.

The findings underscore the need to limit head impacts during football practice and games, said study lead author Brian Stemper, of Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin.

Stemper's team compared 50 Division 1 college footba...

Young football players who suffer repeated head blows -- but not concussions -- may not sustain brain damage, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers followed 112 football players, aged 9 to 18, during the 2016 season.

"We expected repetitive impacts to correlate with worsening neurocognitive [brain] function, but we found that sub-concussive head impacts sustained...

A year after a concussion, up to one-third of kids still have symptoms such as headache and irritability that may affect school performance, a new study finds.

"Children with all types of injuries may show post-concussion symptoms," said lead researcher Linda Ewing-Cobbs, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Center Medical School in Houston.

He...

The most dangerous play in football can be rendered safer through a simple rule change, a new study out of the Ivy League suggests.

Moving the kickoff line forward by just five yards -- from the 35- to the 40-yard line -- reduced the average annual concussion rate in Ivy League football by more than 68 percent, the study revealed.

That change makes players less likely to run...

Immune cells use channels that run from skull bone marrow to the lining of the brain to rapidly respond to stroke and other brain injuries, a new study in mice suggests.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones. Along with red blood cells, it produces immune cells that fight infections and heal injuries.

"We always thought that immune cells from our arms and legs travel...

Traumatic brain injury can trigger a daily struggle with headaches, neck pain, dizziness and thinking problems that may drive some to suicide, researchers report.

That risk more than triples in the first six months after a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and it stays significantly higher over the long term, a new Danish study suggests.

The finding is based on an exhaustive re...

Links between brain damage and contact sports continue to emerge, with scientists now tying repetitive head impacts to a condition that can lead to Parkinson's disease.

Researchers have already tied repetitive head impacts with the brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and dementia. Now, investigators who examined 694 brains after death report ties with Lewy body diseas...

Heading soccer balls poses a much greater threat to women's brains than men's, new research suggests.

The study included 49 female and 49 male amateur soccer players, aged 18 to 50. They reported a similar number of headings over the previous year (an average of 487 headings for the men and 469 for the women).

Brain scans revealed that regions of damaged white matter in the ...

Young athletes with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might be at higher risk of developing depression and anxiety symptoms after a concussion, a preliminary study suggests.

The study, of nearly 1,000 college athletes, found those with both ADHD and a history of concussion scored higher on measures of depression and anxiety. That was in comparison to athletes without ADH...