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Results for search "Environment".

30 Dec

Climate Anxiety Is Affecting Young People Worldwide, New Study Finds

Teens and young adults say government inaction on climate change is leaving them anxious, sad and angry, researchers say.

29 Nov

How Your Diet Impacts Our Climate

A new study finds unhealthy foods account for nearly a quarter of diet-related greenhouse gas emissions

24 Mar

Listening To The Sounds of Nature Has Major Health Benefits, Study Finds.

The sound of birds singing and rain falling can boost your health and lower stress, researchers say.

Health News Results - 375

Tobacco use is far and away the leading cause of lung cancer, but non-smokers are also at risk, experts say.

People who smoke have the highest risk, and smokeless tobacco is also a threat. About 90% of lung cancer cases could be prevented by eliminating tobacco use, according to the World Health Organization...

As air pollution worsens, fruits, flowers and the creatures that pollinate them could pay a price.

That's the takeaway from British researchers who used special equipment to control levels of two common pollutants — diesel exhaust and ozone — in a field of black mustard plants, and then monitored pollinating insects over two summers.

"We knew from our previous lab studies that ...

Power outages are becoming more frequent in the United States, and a new study highlights one consequence of prolonged blackouts: carbon monoxide poisonings.

Looking at major U.S. power outages between 2007 and 2018, researchers found that carbon monoxide poisonings spiked during those disruptions, versus the days immediately before.

The pattern is not surprising, said lead researc...

Everyone knows cleaner air means healthier bodies, but new research suggests it might also help aging minds.

"Our study is important because it is one of the first to show that reducing air pollution over time may benefit the brain health of older women by decreasing their likelihood of developing dementia," said...

Wildfires and rising temperatures are exposing more and more Americans to an air pollution double-whammy of smoke and smog, a new study warns.

Researchers found that over the past 20 years, a growing number of people in western states have been simultaneously exposed to high levels of two kinds of air pollution: Fine-particle pollution generated by

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 12, 2022
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  • Secondhand vapor from electronic cigarettes is harmful to others, causing bronchitis symptoms and shortness of breath in young bystanders, a new study reports.

    Secondhand exposure to vapor increased teens' risk of bronchitis symptoms by 40% and shortness of breath by 53%, according to findings published online Jan. 10 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 11, 2022
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  • If you think frequent changes in weather are triggering your allergy symptoms, you may be right.

    A shift from a cold front to a rainy day then back to warm weather can have an impact on those with allergies, said Dr. David Corry, professor of medicine-immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Medicine, in ...

    While climate change calls to mind extreme weather and melting polar ice caps, government officials' inaction to stop it is also affecting the mental health of young people, new research reveals.

    "This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young peo...

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people — 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide...

    Meat eaters are far more apt to choose plant-based foods at restaurants if menus are at least 75% vegetarian, according to a new study.

    Along with the health benefits, British researchers said getting more people to eat plant-based foods could help fight climate change.

    "Th...

    In a sign that white-tailed deer are becoming a reservoir for the new coronavirus, researchers report that COVID-19 variants are spreading among the wild animals.

    How they became infected and if these variants can infect humans isn't known, experts say.

    "Animal reservoirs of zoonotic viruses po...

    Of course kids make up the bulk of people at schools, but new evidence shows that requiring masks for adults working at schools greatly reduces the severity of COVID-19 outbreaks.

    In the study, the researchers found that children were most often the first identified cases in schools. However, outbreaks in schools were more severe when an adult was the first case, and mask wearing by adul...

    Summer can sizzle in the city, but a new report finds urban living is getting hotter than ever before.

    The research shows that city dwellers may be suffering from what scientists call an urban ...

    A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launch the Global Platform for Access to Childhood C...

    Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

    The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

    "More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

    In an effort to further lower lead levels in drinking water, the Biden administration on Thursday announced $2.9 billion in infrastructure bill funds for lead pipe removal and tighter lead limits.

    The new, tougher limits to be imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are expected to be finalized by 2024 and would require the replacement of remaining lead drinking water pipes a...

    Is air pollution a bigger health threat to minorities?

    Apparently so, claims a new U.S. study that finds while air pollution levels have fallen in recent decades, people of color still have more exposure to dirty air than white Americans do.

    Air pollution is linked to a range of heal...

    Poor neighborhoods of color bore the brunt of a surge in violent crime in U.S. cities early in the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    "This study adds to the mounting body of research showing that equal opportunities — including the opportunity to live, work, learn, play and worship free fro...

    The smoke from wildfires is dangerous for your lungs, but tiny particles from the smoke can also enter your brain and cause lifelong neurological issues, a new animal study suggests.

    Once that happens, the particles may put people at risk for everything from premature aging and various forms of dementia to depression and even psychosis, researchers say.

    "These are fires that are com...

    Dirty air could cancel out some of the brain benefits of exercise, a new study suggests.

    "Physical activity is associated with improved markers of brain health in areas with lower air pollution," said study author Melissa Furlong. "However, some beneficial effects essentially disappeared for vigorous physical activity in areas with the highest levels of air pollution." Furlong is an envi...

    New York City's ban on a certain type of heating oil led to significant reductions in air pollutants that pose a risk to health, new research shows.

    “It is very encouraging to see the overall success of the Clean Heat Program in reducing pollution levels in the city, and particularly exciting to find that the policy is effective in both low- and high-income neighborhoods,” lead author...

    A boy or a girl? New research suggests that the air pregnant women breathe or the water they drink could play a role in their baby's sex.

    The finding stems from tracking hundreds of factors — including pollution exposure — surrounding the birth of more than 6 million Americans...

    If you're getting together with others outdoors, a windy day might be best, researchers say.

    The investigators found that when people socialize outside, the risk of coronavirus infection is as much as 45% greater when there's hardly any breeze than when there are stronger winds.

    "The issue is really about an increased danger of infection spread in the presence of stale air as oppose...

    Worried about climate change? You can do something about it every time you lift your fork, a new study suggests.

    Folks can reduce their personal carbon footprint by eating less red meat, nibbling fewer sweets and cutting back on tea, coffee and booze, according to the findings.

    "We all want to do our bit to help save the planet," said senior researcher Darren Greenwood, a senior lec...

    Extreme heat brings a jump in emergency room visits by adults of all ages, a new study shows.

    While it's well known that extreme heat puts adults aged 65 and older at increased risk of hospitalization and death, it's been less clear how it affects young and middle-aged adults.

    To find out, the researchers analyzed the associations between heat and ER visits among more than 74 millio...

    Singing in a choir may be good for your soul, but it can also spread COVID-19 far more easily than conversation does.

    A new study also found that the louder and person sings or talks, the more particles are spewed into the air, and that more particles are released by men than women, and by adults than children.

    Fears that airborne transmission of COVID-19 could pose a risk to p...

    It's probably fair to say that most people know of the so-called "Freshman 15" — the weight that college students are often said to gain when they're away from home for the first time.

    But in recent decades, matters have gotten much worse in the United States. A new study using national data for people aged 18 to 25 found that while the prevalence of obesity was just over 6% in 1976 to ...

    While climate change gets a lot of notice for its numerous negative impacts around the globe, children's allergies may not be among them.

    Despite climate change, with the longer growing seasons and larger pollen loads that are attributed to it, more than 5,800 children in the Los Angeles area with asthma did not have an increase in allergic sensitization or allergy diagnosis over a 15-yea...

    Race-based gaps in health care and health outcomes persist in every region of the United States, a new state-by-state report card shows.

    Racial and ethnic disparities woven throughout America and its system of health care mean that people of color are more likely to die younger from preventable illnesses than white people, according to a racial equity scorecard developed by The Commonweal...

    A new study confirms that when a country is more accepting of people who are LGBTQ, fewer gay or bisexual men take their own lives.

    In a new study, researchers compared life in a country where LGBTQ folks encounter strong stigma with that in a country where stigma against them is low. The upshot: The risk of depression and suicide dropped significantly when gay men moved to a more toleran...

    While the lockdowns of the pandemic may have done the planet's atmosphere a favor, a new study predicts that discarded masks, gloves and face shields will add more than 25,000 tons of plastic waste to the world's oceans.

    Researchers from Nanjing University's School of Atmospheric Sciences in China and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Scripps Institution of Oceanography used ...

    A new rule to sharply cut methane emissions and other oil and gas industry air pollutants that harm health and contribute to climate change is in the works.

    The new Clean Air Act rule proposed Tuesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would cut 41 million tons of methane emissions between 2023 and 2035.

    That's the equivalent of 920 million metric tons of carbon dioxi...

    Global warming may pose a threat to your kidneys, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from hospitals in more than 1,800 cities in Brazil between 2000 and 2015, and found that just over 7% of all admissions for kidney disease could be attributed to hotter temperatures.

    That equates to more than 202,000 cases of kidney disease, according to the report publi...

    Climate change is already making Americans sick and researchers warn that the nation must take swift action to protect people's well-being.

    "Climate change effects aren't just an abstraction, something that will happen years from now. They are happening today, and they impact every aspect of your health, from the air you breathe [more smoke, more pollen] to the nutritional quality of the ...

    Living near a fast-food restaurant may provide a quick fix if you're famished and pressed for time, but it may boost your odds for type 2 diabetes, a large study of U.S veterans suggests.

    Neighborhoods with more supermarkets, however, may protect you against developing diabetes, especially in suburban and rural areas, the researchers said.

    "The food availability choices in your envi...

    You're driving down the highway when a tornado warning is issued over your car radio. Is it safe to follow widespread advice and seek shelter under an overpass?

    While the U.S. National Weather Service warns that the wind from a tornado can accelerate as it flows under the overpass, creating a wind tunnel effect, a new study found differently.

    "In our research, there is no one findin...

    Just a few hours a week of moderate exercise may reduce your risk of cancer, a new study suggests.

    If Americans got the recommended five hours a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, more than 46,000 cancer cases could be prevented in the United States each year, according to the report.

    The study authors said that 3% of all cancer cases in U.S. adults aged 30 and older from...

    MONDAY, Oct. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) --- A new plan to limit pollution from so-called "forever chemicals" will include restricting their release into the environment and speeding cleanup of contaminated sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday.

    The chemicals, called PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), are used in products ranging from cookware to carpets ...

    Prolonged stays in space appear to damage astronauts' brains, a small, new study suggests.

    The researchers studied five Russian cosmonauts, mean age 49, who stayed on the International Space Station (ISS) for an average of 5.5 months.

    Blood samples were taken from the cosmonauts 20 days before their departure to the ISS, and one day, one week, and about three weeks after they return...

    Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

    The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

    The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children a...

    You can add obesity and its related health risks to the long list of threats posed by climate change, researchers report.

    In a new review, researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia outlined the association between climate change and obesity.

    As global temperatures increase, people may become less physically active and less able to burn excess fat, putting them at incr...

    Urban dwellers around the globe are sweating through three times as many "extreme heat" days as their counterparts did in the 1980s, a new study suggests.

    The study is the latest to chart humans' growing exposure to dangerously high temperatures. Experts said it looked at what's happening in finer detail than previous research has -- and it suggests that exposure to extreme heat is more w...

    Climate change is the "single biggest health threat facing humanity," and governments must "act with urgency" to tackle the crisis, a World Health Organization (WHO) special report warns.

    In advance of a United Nation's climate change summit in early November, groups representing 45 million nurses, doctors and health professionals worldwide signed an open letter urging action on the clima...

    Scientists in Japan have discovered yet another tick-borne virus that can make people sick.

    The Yezo virus is transmitted by tick bites, and triggers fever and a reduction in blood platelets and white blood cells.

    "At least seven people have been infected with this new virus in Japan since 2014, but, so far, no deaths have been confirmed," said Keita Matsuno, a virologist at Hokkaid...

    You might think that wildfires in the western United States would only affect folks in places like Colorado, California or Oregon.

    But a new study estimates that three-quarters of smoke-related deaths and visits to the emergency room for asthma in the United States happen east of the Rocky Mount...

    The rings of stately pines on the coasts of North and South Carolina offer telling long-term evidence of climate change and a chilling forecast for the future.

    The upshot: The last 300 years have gotten wetter and wetter, making hurricanes ever more dangerous.

    "Our findings suggest that the maximum amount of rainfall from these storms is increasing and is likely going to continue to...

    More than 50% of American children have detectable blood lead levels, a new study reveals. And young children who live in places with lots of pre-1950s housing and low incomes have the greatest risk.

    "Public health authorities have worked commendably to reduce lead exposure for decades, and yet, substantial risk remains," said study co-author Dr. Harvey Kaufman, head of health trends rese...

    Nuclear war would trigger worldwide climate change and take a dire toll on food production and human health, according to scientists who studied different scenarios using a modern climate model.

    "Although we suspected that ozone would be destroyed after nuclear war and that would result in enhanced ultraviolet light at the Earth's surface, if there was too much smoke, it would block out t...

    When COVID-19 restrictions forced you indoors, it brought birds back to North America, new research shows.

    Across the United States and Canada, birders documented an 80% increase among most of the 82 species they recorded since the start of pandemic restrictions last year.

    Some species (26%) increased in response to drops in certain types of human activity, while decreasing in resp...

    In a move to combat global warming, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced Thursday that it will restrict U.S. production and use of hydrofluorocarbons by 85% over the next 15 years.

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are potent greenhouse gases often used in refrigerators and air conditioners, and they are vastly more powerful than carbon dioxide. These gases can leak into the a...

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