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Health News Results - 33

Both cyberbullies and their victims can suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new British study finds.

Cyberbullying is bullying online rather than in person. It's so pervasive that pediatricians should routinely ask their patients about it as part of psychological assessment, the researchers said.

"Parents, teachers a...

The coronavirus pandemic can be especially difficult for children and adults with autism and their families, experts say.

Self-isolation and disruption of routine are tough for anyone, but may emotionally upend someone with an autism spectrum disorder, said Dr. Adrien Eshraghi, a professor and director of the University of Miami Hearing Research and Communication Disorders Laboratory....

A child with an uncle or aunt with autism appears to have a more than doubled risk of being diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder themselves, a new U.S. government-funded study reports.

Roughly 3% to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism can also be expected to have some form of autism, compared with just 1.5% of children overall, according to the study fun...

Hunkering down during the coronavirus pandemic has stressed families and raised the risk for child abuse, Penn State researchers report.

"We're very worried about children becoming more seriously injured over longer periods of time before they can get treatment," said Dr. Lori Frasier, chief of the division of child abuse pediatrics at Penn State Children's Hospital.

Data f...

Children treated in America's emergency rooms for mental health disorders jumped 60% over a recent decade, a new study finds.

Between 2007 and 2016, visits for self-harm like suicidal thoughts and cutting soared 329% and treatment for drug abuse rose 159%, according to the study led by Charmaine Lo, from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

"This is...

They're not at school. They miss their friends. And Mom and Dad look worried. Lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic can take a toll on everyone, especially kids.

Most children are aware of what's going on at some level, said Dr. David Schonfeld, director of the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

Even toddlers pick up on...

All hugs are not created equal -- and babies as young as 4 months are proof.

Heart rates in infants less than a year old slowed more during a hug than a hold. And the hug had a greater effect when it came from Mom or Dad rather than from a stranger, according to a study published April 7 in the journal iScience.

The findings offer some of the first proof that hugs hel...

Young boys whose mothers were exposed to chemicals known as phthalates while pregnant may face an increased risk for developing behaviors associated with autism, a new study warns.

Phthalates are chemicals found in many household products, including cosmetics and plastics.

The study didn't identify a heightened risk for autism per se among boys, but rather a "small" increas...

It's supposed to be the best time in your life, but a new study finds that U.S. high school students have mostly negative feelings throughout their schoolday.

Surveying nearly 22,000 students nationwide, researchers found about 75% expressed boredom, anger, sadness, fear or stress.

Girls were slightly more negative than boys, according to the Yale Center for Emotional In...

Students have better focus in class if teachers praise them for being good rather than scolding them for being bad, according to a new study.

Researchers spent three years observing more than 2,500 students in 19 elementary schools across Missouri, Tennessee and Utah. The children came from 151 classes from kindergarten through grade 6.

The students exhibited 20%-30% g...

Girls tend to be diagnosed with autism at an older age than boys, perhaps delaying essential treatment, a new study concludes.

That delay in diagnosis is a clinically important finding, said study author Eric Morrow, an associate professor of molecular biology, neuroscience and psychiatry at Brown University.

"The major treatment that has some efficacy in autism is early dia...

Despite a growing need for mental health care for children and teens -- including a rise in youth suicide -- many areas of the United States lack any child psychiatrists, new research reports.

The study found that almost three-quarters of American counties don't have a single child psychiatrist.

"There are about 17 million children in the United States with a mental health...

Autism rates among U.S. children are rising fastest among blacks and Hispanics, researchers say.

"We found that rates among blacks and Hispanics are not only catching up to those of whites -- which have historically been higher -- but surpassing them," said study author Cynthia Nevison, a research scientist at the University of Colorado Boulder.

"These results suggest that a...

Over the past weekend, 21 people were killed in a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, while a separate incident in Dayton, Ohio, claimed the lives of nine people. Dozens more were injured.

For adults, horrific and senseless events like these have become a tragic, recurrent aspect of American life over the past few decades.

But for children, and especially very youn...

"Don't fight in front of the kids."

Sounds like familiar advice that's been passed down from generation to generation. But as it turns out, it's not always the fighting, but rather the way you fight that can have a negative -- or a positive -- effect on your children.

Researchers E. Mark Cummings and Patrick Davies have studied this topic for decades. They say hearing paren...

Heartfelt talks between parent and child are essential to help kids overcome tough times and do their best at school, a new study says.

Traumatic events in a kid's life can cause the child to neglect school work and increase the odds that they'll wind up repeating a grade, researchers found.

But having even one parent lend a kind and caring ear appears to help kids work past...

He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of support we can provide kids who may feel is...

To the millions of parents who worry about the extra pounds their child might pile on while playing Xbox all day, rest easy.

A new study suggests that video game-loving kids aren't any heavier than those who aren't into the gaming scene.

Childhood obesity affects an estimated 13.7 million children and adolescents in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Diseas...

Believe it or not, how your kid acts in kindergarten might impact his earning potential years later, a new study suggests.

Canadian researchers found that boys and girls who were identified by their kindergarten teachers as inattentive earned nearly $1,300 less a year than their more focused peers.

Additionally, boys identified as more aggressive also earned less -- about ...

Getting a young child involved in organized sports may have a mental health payoff down the line, according to a new study.

Kids who had participated in athletic programs between ages 6 and 10 had less emotional distress, anxiety and shyness by age 12. They were also less likely to suffer from social withdrawal, researchers found.

"The elementary school years are a critical ti...

You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win.

Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it's never too late to correct the behavior, even if it's a well-established pattern in an older child.<...

Lupus patients who had difficult childhoods have higher disease activity, worse depression and poorer overall health than those with better childhoods, a new study finds.

Bad childhood experiences included abuse, neglect and household challenges.

The study included 269 lupus patients in California. Of those, about 63% reported at least one type of bad childhood experienc...

Although autism is typically diagnosed around age 3 or 4, new research suggests it can be spotted soon after a child's first birthday.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorders early is "extremely important because the brain is really plastic during early development," said the study's lead author, Karen Pierce.

The study found that 84% of those diagnosed early still met t...

Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises parents to set limit...

Suicide attempts and talk about suicide are rising alarmingly among America's kids, with emergency departments seeing a near doubling of cases over less than a decade, a new study reveals.

Among children aged 5 to 18, suicidal thoughts and attempts led to more than 1.1 million ER visits in 2015 -- up from about 580,000 in 2007, according to an analysis of U.S. data.

"What w...

The risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and teens is higher if they think their response to a traumatic event is abnormal, a new study indicates.

Most kids fully recover after a traumatic event, such as a car accident. But some develop PTSD that may endure for months, years or even into adulthood, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia in th...

Abuse during childhood can cause structural changes in the brain that increase a person's risk of severe and recurrent depression, a new study reveals.

The findings "add further weight to the notion that patients with clinical depression who were mistreated as children are clinically distinct" from people who didn't suffer such trauma in early life, said study leader Nils Opel. He's a...

Thinking about a TV for your young child? Based on new evidence, you might want to reconsider that.

Preschoolers who had a TV in their bedroom were at increased risk for poor eating habits, overweight/obesity and social/emotional struggles in their teens, Canadian researchers say.

"The early years are a critical period in a child's development," said study author Linda Pagan...

Obese kids may have extra difficulty with schoolwork and coping under stress, a preliminary study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 23,000 parents, researchers found that kids who were obese were less likely to show certain indicators of "flourishing," versus their normal-weight peers.

That meant less engagement in schoolwork and learning, and more difficulty coping with chall...

Can violent video games push some kids to act violently in real life? A new research review suggests the answer is "yes."

The analysis combined the results of 24 past studies, involving more than 17,000 children and teenagers. Overall, researchers found, kids who played video games featuring fighting, attacks and killing were somewhat more likely than their peers to become more aggres...

Two-minute exercise breaks in the classroom may help school children meet physical activity goals without disrupting learning, new research suggests.

University of Michigan researchers say short bursts of in-classroom activity can trim childhood obesity rates while helping elementary schools provide 30 minutes of daily exercise for students.

"What we're showing is that we ca...

By fourth grade, girls in the United States read and write better than boys, a new study reveals.

Australian researchers found this gender achievement gap appears in standardized tests and worsens over time.

"The common thinking is that boys and girls in grade school start with the same cognitive ability, but this research suggests otherwise," said the study's lead author,...

Time spent reading to toddlers or having "conversations" with them helps boost their intelligence and thinking skills, even a decade later, new research shows.

The study found that the more "conversational turns" that occurred in a toddler's day, the better children performed on tests that measure IQ, language skills and thinking skills in middle school. A conversational turn is when...