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Health News Results - 111

It's all about him. Or her.

New research supports what much of the electorate may already suspect: Many narcissistic people are drawn to politics, and that could put democracy in danger.

As the researchers defined it, narcissism is a combination of selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration.

"Successful democratic functioning requires trust in institutions...

Four in 10 health care workers who test positive for COVID-19 don't have symptoms, which means they could unknowingly spread the disease to co-workers and patients, researchers say.

For the new study, the research team reviewed 97 studies that included more than 230,000 health care workers in 24 countries. Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the health care workers ranged from 7% ...

Being a selfish jerk won't pave a path to success, new research suggests.

The study involved hundreds of participants who completed personality assessments when they were undergraduates or MBA students at three universities.

The researchers checked in with the same people about 14 years later to find out how well they'd done in their careers, and their co-workers were asked ...

At the peak of the pandemic in the United States and United Kingdom, frontline health care workers, especially minorities, had much higher risks for COVID-19 than other individuals, a new study finds.

Paramedics, who are often the first to see sick patients, are at far greater risk of testing positive for COVID-19 than others, the researchers said. That's especially true for frontlin...

Joint replacements for knee osteoarthritis are becoming more common, and now researchers have identified jobs that may lead to one.

Based on a review of 71 studies that included nearly one million workers, the riskiest occupations include agriculture, construction, mining, service jobs and housekeeping. And jobs that demand excessive kneeling, squatting, standing, lifting and climbin...

Aerosol boxes meant to protect health care workers when they intubate COVID-19 patients may actually increase their exposure to airborne virus particles, an Australian study warns.

Intubation is done when patients are placed on a ventilator.

Aerosol boxes have been touted as a quick, simple way to protect workers, but their effectiveness and safety were never clinically test...

Many more American workers caring for children, the sick or aged, as well as bus drivers, subway workers and those involved in food production took time off work in April -- probably due to fears of contracting COVID-19, a new government report finds.

In an analysis of federal employment data on work absenteeism from October 2019 until the end of April 2020, researchers found that abs...

Working at home during a pandemic isn't an option for about three-quarters of U.S. workers, putting them at increased risk of infection, a new study finds.

Those 108 million workers tend to be among the lowest paid and are more likely to face pandemic-related job disruptions, including layoffs, furloughs or reduced hours.

"This pandemic has really exacerbated existing vulner...

If you're working from home because of the coronavirus pandemic and expect to keep doing so, you need to be sure your work station is set up properly, an orthopedic specialist says.

You also need to take regular breaks to move around, according to Terrence McGee, a physical therapist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

In an office, many people have ...

For many, work-at-home orders aimed at fighting the COVID-19 pandemic have had an unintended side effect: sleep loss.

"We've seen a significant increase in reports of stress-related insomnia in recent months," said Julio Fernandez-Mendoza of the Penn State Health Sleep Research and Treatment Center in Hummelstown, Penn.

Stress and worry about the pandemic is one reason and ...

With businesses beginning to reopen, the National Safety Council (NSC) has tips for doing it right.

"We hope these universal actions, the detailed playbooks and the recommendations within them will help employers safely navigate reopening operations while prioritizing employees' rights to safe work environments," said Lorraine Martin, NSC president and CEO.

Here are top tip...

People with physically demanding jobs take more sick leave. They also have higher unemployment rates and shorter work lives, a new Danish study finds.

"This study showed that high physical work demands are a marked risk factor for a shortened expected working life and increased years of sickness absence and unemployment," study co-author Lars Andersen and colleagues wrote. Andersen is...

Mental health problems and substance abuse are common among cops, and more needs to be done to address those issues, researchers say.

Previous studies have suggested that first responders have a higher risk of mental health issues than the general public, but it wasn't clear how police officers were affected.

To learn more, researchers reviewed 67 studies that included more ...

TUESDAY, May 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) --White-collar employees heading back to the office after months of sheltering at home are likely to find a drastically changed workplace in the wake of COVID-19, experts say.

Until now, offices have been designed primarily around business needs, with some nods toward fire safety, said Nellie Brown, director of workplace health and safety program...

COVID-19 has at least temporarily shut down more than half of cancer research, according to an American Cancer Society (ACS) survey.

The survey, conducted in early April, was completed by close to 500 cancer researchers who have received ACS funding. It revealed that:

  • 54% were working from home.
  • 32% were working both at home and in their lab.
  • ...

As coronavirus pandemic restrictions are lifted, many Americans will face physical and mental health challenges -- including fear and anxiety -- as they return to work.

"Uncertainty and unpredictability can really create an unhealthy amount of fear and stress, especially when it's sustained over such a long period of time," said Dr. K. Luan Phan, head of psychiatry and behavioral heal...

The COVID-19 pandemic has done untold economic damage in the United States, with businesses shuttering and people self-isolating at home to try to slow the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus.

You might think hospitals and health care systems would be immune to this wave of financial ruin, since there's no industry more crucial to America's fight against the pandemic.

<...

Injuries in the United States take a huge toll on the workplace, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed millions of workplace health insurance claims among adults aged 18 to 64 between 2014 and 2015, with a specific focus on non-fatal injuries treated in emergency departments.

The injuries examined in the study included burns, poisonings, gunshot wounds, fal...

The coronavirus pandemic has put a spotlight on the sacrifices of America's health care workers, yet many of them live in poverty and can't afford health insurance.

A new study finds that more than 600,000 health care workers are poor and potentially without insurance or paid sick leave, and up to 4 million have health problems that put them at risk of dying from COVID-19.

If more women were hired for trucking jobs, the roads would be a lot safer, British researchers suggest.

That's because men, who hold most driving jobs, are more likely to drive dangerously. This puts other road users at risk, said lead researcher Rachel Aldred. She's a reader in transport at the University of Westminster in London.

"Greater gender equity would have a posi...

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to already high stress levels in emergency rooms, a social psychologist says.

"ER providers are on the front line of this pandemic, and stress, anxiety and anger are increasing," said Linda Isbell, a professor of psychology at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"As we all face anxiety about the fallout of this pandemic, anger about a healt...

Many surgeons have neck and back pain after performing operations, a small new study finds.

It included 53 surgeons (34 men and 19 women) who did 116 operations at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. They wore devices that measured neck, back and arm posture during surgery, and were asked about pain and fatigue levels before and after.

Pain increased after surgery in every body area...

Could long hours at the office put you at risk for hypothyroidism?

New research suggests it's possible: Hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid) was more than twice as common in adults who worked 53 to 83 hours a week as in those who worked 36 to 42 hours a week (3.5% vs. 1.4%).

Hypothyroidism can cause tiredness, depression, feeling cold and weight gain, and it's als...

As the coronavirus pandemic stresses the U.S. health care system, personal protective equipment -- including high-tech masks -- are in desperately short supply.

But a new study suggests an innovative solution: Reusable respirators typically used by construction or factory workers may be a viable alternative to disposable N95 respirators used by health care personnel.

The r...

"I have worked the last four days, and I have cried every day."

Eileen McStay, a registered nurse at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, is on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, and it is mentally and emotionally wearing her and her colleagues down.

McStay works on a hospital floor filled with nothing but lonely, scared coronavirus patients, some of whom are fi...

Being recognized for your efforts at work could reduce your risk of burnout, new research suggests.

Emotional exhaustion, decreased productivity and depersonalization (loss of identity) are characteristics of burnout, a widespread problem that takes a significant toll on workers and employers, the researchers said.

For the study, they asked 328 employees to complete a questi...

Millions of workers who constantly interact with the public are exposed to viruses and bacteria on a weekly basis, and so they face a greater risk of falling ill with coronavirus, a new analysis reveals.

Due to the nature of their jobs, about 1 in 10 U.S. workers (14.4 million) face exposure to infections weekly, while nearly 2 of 10 (26.7 million) are exposed at least once a month in...

The argument against paid maternity leave in the United States often focuses on the cost, but a new study suggests that more paid leave would not only be beneficial for families, but also for society.

In the study, researchers found that new parents with paid medical leave of 12 weeks or more were more likely to be in better mental and physical shape than those who received less paid ...

Financial struggles are common among young breast cancer patients in the United States, even if they have steady jobs that provide health insurance, new research shows.

The study included 830 women, aged 18 to 39, in California, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2013 and December 2014.

Nearly half (47%) of the women...

People who work with potentially dangerous chemicals or hazardous metals such as lead may unwittingly bring those toxic substances home, a new review says.

In the home, these substances put family members, especially children, at risk of serious illness.

While precautions may be taken in the workplace to protect workers, these take-home exposures may fall into a regulatory bli...

People afflicted with cluster headaches miss work twice as often as colleagues without the debilitating headaches, a new study finds.

Cluster headaches are extremely painful headaches that last from 15 minutes to three hours, for many days, or even weeks, in a row. They're more common in men.

For the study, Swedish researchers compared more than 3,200 working-age people who ...

Protections may be in place for employees who breastfeed, but the onus is on working moms to seek out the resources they need, according to a University of Georgia survey.

"We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation," said lead author Rachel McCardel, ...

When most people think of sexual harassment of females on the job, they assume it's happening to lower-level staffers. But surprisingly, women supervisors actually encounter more of it than other female workers, a new study finds.

Researchers examined workplace sexual harassment in the United States, Japan and Sweden. They found that female supervisors experienced between 30% and ...

More than one-third of working Americans don't get enough sleep, and the problem is greatest among the police, the military, health care workers and truckers, researchers report.

Their analysis of data from more than 150,000 employed adults between 2010 and 2018 also found that the rate of inadequate sleep (7 hours or less) rose from about 31% to nearly 36% during that time....

Minimum wage laws can be a literal lifesaver for people who are struggling to get by, a new study suggests.

The suicide rate declines among less-educated folks when the minimum wage is increased, researchers discovered.

States experience as much as a 6% decrease in their suicide rates for every $1 increase in the minimum wage, said lead researcher John Kaufman, a doctora...

If you're not taking regular breaks to move around during your workday, your muscles may rebel after being scrunched in your desk chair hour after hour.

The rebellion might be felt in your neck, shoulders, back, hips and legs when you do finally stand up. Stop the insurrection with these three simple stretching exercises you can do without even leaving your workstation or office.

...

It's a connection that health officials might miss, but an alarming new study shows that when factories close, deaths from opioid overdoses soar.

"There's this sense of increasing despair among people -- especially people who are working-class who have seen in the last several decades a lot of their economic opportunities wither away," said lead researcher Dr. Atheendar Venkataraman...

Long hours spent working will do no favors for your blood pressure, a new Canadian study suggests.

The five-year study tracked the working hours and blood pressure readings of 3,500 white-collar workers at three public institutions in the province of Quebec.

Compared to those who worked less than 35 hours a week, those who worked 49 or more hours each week had a 70% high...

Nurses get less sleep before their scheduled shifts compared to nonwork days, which could affect patient care, according to a new study.

How much less sleep? Almost an hour and a half.

"Nurses are sleeping, on average, less than recommended amounts prior to work, which may have an impact on their health and performance on the job," said study lead author Amy Witkoski Stimpfe...

Being a musician might be hard on your hearing, new British research suggests.

Those in the music industry have a much higher risk of tinnitus than people who work in quieter settings, a new study finds.

People with tinnitus hear ringing, buzzing or whistling noises when there are no external sounds.

"Our research shows that people working in the music industry are...

Could your chosen profession determine the health of your heart?

It could certainly have an influence, new research suggests.

Scientists analyzed data from more than 65,000 postmenopausal women in the United States and found that several jobs were associated with poor heart health.

Compared to women with other jobs, the risk of poor heart health was: 36% higher...

Requiring drivers to get treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) saved a trucking company a large amount in insurance costs for other health conditions, a new study shows.

People with apnea repeatedly stop breathing and wake partially during the night, resulting in poor sleep that can worsen other medical conditions.

Researchers noted that even though OSA has been linked...

Few meals may be less loved than the workday lunch. Pulled from a brown bag, yanked from a microwave in the middle of a shift or nabbed from a bland cafeteria between meetings, it's more associated with frustration than nutrition.

A recent online survey by the Harris Poll for the American Heart Association and the food service company Aramark put numbers on that frustration: More tha...

Hard-hat jobs are tough and demanding, often entailing intense physical labor performed in dangerous situations.

But a new study finds construction work also comes with another danger: An increased risk of drug abuse.

Construction workers and miners are much more likely than people in other professions to misuse opioids, cocaine and marijuana, the research showed

C...

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to findings published online Oct. 18 in J...

Money may not buy happiness, but a bigger paycheck is good for your heart. And new research suggests the reverse is also true: When income drops, your risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure goes up.

"One could argue that the fraying social and economic fabric of American society is, quite literally, killing us," said Dr. Edward Havranek, a professor of medicine and cardiology...

Add this to the list of daily hazards taxi drivers face: A new study shows they are exposed to excessive levels of black carbon from diesel engines.

Taxi drivers experience higher levels of the pollutant than couriers, truckers, waste removal and emergency service workers, researchers say.

For the study, 140 professional drivers in central London carried monitors linked wit...

Working around high levels of pesticides may translate into a high risk for heart trouble later, a new study suggests.

That was the case for a group of Japanese-American men in Hawaii who were followed for more than three decades. Compared to men who had not worked around pesticides, those who had the greatest exposure had a 45% higher risk for heart disease or stroke, researchers...

Walking speed may indicate whether young stroke survivors are ready to return to work, a new study suggests.

And 3 feet per second may be the threshold that predicts whether they can meet a workday's challenges, the researchers found.

One of every four people who has a stroke is younger than 65 years old. As many as 44% may be unable to return to work, largely because of...