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Results for search "Child Development".

12 Nov

Infant Sleep and Mental Development

How many consecutive hours should your baby be sleeping at 6 months of age?

30 Oct

Chemicals and Language Development

Prenatal exposure to chemicals found in plastics may delay language development.

Health News Results - 341

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many children have difficulty with learning at some point, but those with learning disabilities often have several specific and persistent signs, which can start in preschool years. Recognizing them as soon as possible allows a child to get needed help and make better progress.

General signs include difficulty with reading, writing, math skill...

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a no-brainer -- not getting enough sleep makes it harder for kids to learn. And a new study finds that starting school later in the morning can help teens be more alert during the day.

In 2017, the Cherry Creek School District in Greenwood Village, Colo., changed start times from 8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. for its middle school students and ...

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a young child involved in organized sports may have a mental health payoff down the line, according to a new study.

Kids who had participated in athletic programs between ages 6 and 10 had less emotional distress, anxiety and shyness by age 12. They were also less likely to suffer from social withdrawal, researchers found.

"Th...

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your newborn is breastfeeding and losing weight, will feeding her formula do any harm?

Though doctors have long advised against it, a new study suggests giving baby both formula and the breast is OK.

Researchers said the answer depends on how long a mother intends to breastfeed and it needs to be balanced against the risks newbor...

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding moms with healthy eating habits have slimmer infants, who could then be protected from obesity later, researchers say.

Rapid weight gain and fat accumulation during an infant's first six months of life is a risk factor for obesity later on, they explained.

"A baby who is shooting up through the percentiles in weight-fo...

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research illustrates a heartbreaking, vicious cycle: Teasing kids about their weight not only bruises their self-esteem, it also appears to trigger more weight gain.

In fact, middle schoolers who reported high levels of weight-related teasing had a 33% higher jump in their body mass index per year compared to peers who weren't teased ...

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Coming from a broken home or suffering abuse can traumatize a child, but new research suggests team sports might be just the medicine these kids need.

Tracking U.S. health data from nearly 10,000 people, researchers found that teens who experienced childhood trauma and played team sports had lower odds of depression and anxiety as young adul...

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chores. Whether you're an adult or a child, the very word makes any job sound less than fun.

But these everyday tasks make households run, and engaging kids in age-appropriate chores from an early age teaches them invaluable life skills, instills in them a sense of responsibility and boosts self-esteem through accomplishment, according to the...

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just because a guy can make babies later in life doesn't mean it's risk-free.

The partners and children of men who become fathers at an older age are at increased risk for health problems, a new study finds.

"While it is widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy and the h...

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With childhood obesity rates high, many studies have investigated lifestyle factors that can make a difference -- which ones increase the risk and which ones reduce it.

Beyond diet, a lack of sleep has been linked to weight gain both in adults and children, so it's important that kids get enough shuteye, even with their -- and your -- busy sc...

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win.

Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it's never too late to correct the behavior, even if it's a wel...

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 million babies are born across the globe weighing far less than they should, and the problem isn't limited to low-income countries, new research shows.

In 2015, nearly three-quarters of infants with low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds) were born in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. But low birth weights persist in high-i...

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus patients who had difficult childhoods have higher disease activity, worse depression and poorer overall health than those with better childhoods, a new study finds.

Bad childhood experiences included abuse, neglect and household challenges.

The study included 269 lupus patients in California. Of those, about 63% reported at ...

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Play plenty of Pokemon as a child, and your brain may tuck your favorite characters away in a special place where they are never forgotten.

Researchers from Stanford University believe that's exactly what happened with a small group of adults they tested.

"It's been an open question in the field why we have brain regions that respond t...

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cases in which a newborn's genitals make it unclear whether the child is a boy or girl may be more common than once believed, researchers say.

One example of what's known as ambiguous genitalia is a baby girl with an enlarged clitoris that looks more like a small penis, the study authors explained.

In some cases, infants have external ...

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The sooner a child with autism is diagnosed, the better, and now new research describes a novel way of catching it earlier than ever.

Well-child visits that include developmental screening might pick up the first hints of autism risk in some children, the study suggests.

"We think this has the potential to identify children at risk fo...

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The belly-brain connection is gaining traction in autism research. And a new study suggests gut bacteria may play a role in the disorder or some of its symptoms.

Although this research is in its infancy, it's hoped that someday scientists might tweak the gut bacteria to ease digestive symptoms of autism spectrum disorder.

The latest...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although autism is typically diagnosed around age 3 or 4, new research suggests it can be spotted soon after a child's first birthday.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorders early is "extremely important because the brain is really plastic during early development," said the study's lead author, Karen Pierce.

The study found that 8...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Are many women who smoke switching to e-cigarettes during pregnancy?

That's the suggestion from a new study that finds close to 4% of pregnant American women are vaping, and the rate of e-cigarette use is actually higher among pregnant women than women who aren't pregnant.

The researchers also found that e-cigarette use in pregn...

SATURDAY, April 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Another reason breast is best: Breast milk boosts levels of chemicals crucial for brain growth and development in premature babies with a very low birth weight, a new study reveals.

"Our previous research established that vulnerable preterm infants who are fed breast milk early in life have improved brain growth ...

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even though the harms to babies are well known, one in nine pregnant women in the United States drinks alcohol, new research shows.

In one-third of those cases, frequent binge drinking is also often involved.

What's more, the rate of drinking during pregnancy is actually on the rise, with a slight uptick in the rate over the past ...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

<...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a parent, you want to do everything right to nurture your child. Besides serving healthy food and encouraging daily exercise, three other lifestyle habits can have a huge impact on your child's mental and physical well-being and development.

In an article in JAMA Pediatrics, Dr. Dimitri Christakis, of the Seattle Children's Res...

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Does playing a lot of video games really jeopardize a boy's ability to make and keep friends?

Maybe not, reports a team of Norwegian and American researchers.

Investigators spent six years tracking the gaming habits and social interactions of nearly 900 Norwegian children from ages 6 to 12. They found that as a whole, children who ...

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- One of the most valuable lessons in pediatrician April Inniss' medical career came from an 8-year-old boy.

Inniss was just out of medical school and was asked to draw blood from the terrified young patient at a Boston hospital. The child was diagnosed with chronic stomach issues, and had a distrust of health care providers....

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tighter high blood pressure guidelines for children might better spot those at risk for heart disease in adulthood, a new study suggests.

Compared to 2004 guidelines, the updated 2017 guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the number of children considered to have high blood pressure.

But it wasn't known if the...

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Acad...

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Leading health organizations are warning about the possibility of video game addiction.

The World Health Organization has included it in the latest edition of its reference book of health disorders, while the American Psychiatric Association's book offers warning signs but does not yet list it as an addiction. So parents might wonder whet...

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whether you call it snowplow, bulldozer or helicopter parenting, these child-rearing styles have gotten a lot of attention recently, and the acknowledgment that they may not be the best way to raise a confident, well-adjusted young person.

Moving obstacles out of a child's way is not the same as providing the nurturing he or she needs.

...

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A newborn's first stool holds telltale clues about his risk for becoming an overweight 3-year-old, according to a European study.

The clues come from the population of bacteria (microbiome) in the baby's gut.

Finnish researchers used genetic sequencing to analyze the first stool produced by 212 newborns and another sample at age 1....

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- During pregnancy, even harmless-sounding "natural" supplements should be avoided, a new research review suggests.

The review of 74 published studies found that a handful linked certain herbal products to increased risks of pregnancy complications -- including preterm birth and cesarean delivery.

That's not proof that the suppleme...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living near a major road may significantly increase a young child's risk of developmental delays, a new study claims.

It also found that children whose mothers were exposed during pregnancy to high levels of specific types of traffic-related air pollution had slightly higher odds of developmental delays.

"Our results suggest that...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With childhood obesity rates soaring, prevention should start at a very early age. One approach gaining in popularity is baby-led weaning.

This means that, when solid foods are introduced, ideally at 6 months, parents let the baby feed himself or herself rather than mom or dad spoon-feeding the typical baby food purees.

This method ...

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children born to mothers who used marijuana during pregnancy may be at increased risk for psychosis, according to a new study.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis analyzed data from an ongoing nationwide study of child health and brain development.

The analysis included nearly 4,400 children born to about 3,800 mothers...

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A smartphone application that works with Google Glass might help kids with autism build their social skills, a small clinical trial suggests.

Researchers found that over six weeks, kids who used the app at home with their families made greater gains in certain social abilities, compared to those who stuck with their usual therapy alone.

...

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Racial segregation starts early in a child's life, with vulnerable black "preemies" receiving worse hospital care in the United States than white, Hispanic or Asian infants, a new investigation finds.

Researchers looked at segregation and the quality of care at more than 700 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), focusing on babies born very ...

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to reading to toddlers, apparently there is no substitute for an old-fashioned book.

That's according to new research that found paper books foster better parent-child interactions than electronic books do.

This held true even when comparing print books against very basic e-readers that don't contain distracting elemen...

SUNDAY, March 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers-to-be who expose their pregnant partners to secondhand smoke put their babies at risk of heart defects, researchers warn.

For the new study, investigators in China reviewed 125 studies that included a total of nearly 9 million prospective parents and more than 137,000 babies with congenital heart defects.

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's never too soon to teach kids to be culturally competent -- to learn about, respect and accept people whose culture is different from their own.

Children as young as 2 start to become aware of differences among people -- starting with gender -- and to be sensitive to attitudes held by those around them. Experts believe that a child's cult...

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are exposed to common pesticides, either while in the womb or in the first year of life, may be more likely to develop autism, a new study suggests.

While the researchers stressed that it's premature to say that pesticide exposure actually causes autism, they pointed out that theirs is not the first investigation to sound alarm...

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Abuse during childhood can cause structural changes in the brain that increase a person's risk of severe and recurrent depression, a new study reveals.

The findings "add further weight to the notion that patients with clinical depression who were mistreated as children are clinically distinct" from people who didn't suffer such trauma in ea...

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking about a TV for your young child? Based on new evidence, you might want to reconsider that.

Preschoolers who had a TV in their bedroom were at increased risk for poor eating habits, overweight/obesity and social/emotional struggles in their teens, Canadian researchers say.

"The early years are a critical period in a child's...

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New parents worry about a lot of things, but the American Academy of Pediatrics says one thing they can cross off that list is concern about giving high-allergy foods too early in life.

In fact, the pediatric group says it's likely better to introduce foods like peanut butter when kids are around 6 months of age.

"There's no reason ...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a newborn comes home, parents know sleep goes out the window. But new research shows that sleep loss could plague Mom and Dad for up to six years.

"What is new in the current study is that we compare sleep before pregnancy with sleep up to six years after birth," study author Sakari Lemola explained. "We were surprised to see that sleep ...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Something as simple as taking prenatal vitamins during the first month of pregnancy might lower the odds of having a second child with autism.

As researchers explain in a new report, once one child has been diagnosed with autism, any subsequent children face a higher risk of having the developmental disorder.

But the study found t...

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Some schools offer breakfast in the classroom to ensure that hungry children start the day with a full stomach so they're ready to learn. But this may have an unintended consequence -- it may raise the risk of childhood obesity.

New research found that when kids in fourth through sixth grade were offered breakfast in the classroom at the star...

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Obese young children may have less risk for high blood pressure if their mother took the omega-3 fatty acid DHA -- found in fish oil -- during pregnancy, new research suggests.

The findings could be important since rising numbers of American children are obese and experiencing hikes in blood pressure.

That could have long-term conseq...

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children who live in homes with vinyl flooring and flame-retardant furniture have higher levels of potentially harmful chemicals in their blood or urine, researchers have found.

The new study included 203 children from 190 families who were tested for these chemicals -- so-called semi-volatile organic compounds (or SVOCs) -- in their blood...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The electronic babysitter is alive and thriving in the new digital age.

A new study says it all: Children under the age of 2 spend twice the amount of time in front of a screen each day -- almost three hours, to be exact -- as they did 20 years ago.

Kids are being exposed to far more screen time than recommended by pediatric experts...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are given general anesthesia for an hour are unlikely to suffer harm, but the safety of longer and repeated exposure remains unknown, a new study says.

Among more than 700 infants in seven countries, the researchers didn't find any measurable neurodevelopmental or behavioral problems up to the age of 5.

"Nearly half the g...

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Wellness Library Results - 110

Expectant parents can be forgiven if they panic when they hear the word "bonding." Library shelves and Web sites are devoted to the importance of bonding with a newborn and the trauma that may result when it doesn't take place. Many parents now fear that if they don't bond immediately, their children may be scarred for life. No wonder the issue has wrought so much stress. Studies in the last two d...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, you want to show him his behavior is unacceptable and must change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages you don't want to send:

Why does my child have tantrums? Some preschoolers throw tantrums for the same reasons they did as toddlers: because they're exhausted, hungry, or scared. But at this age it's more likely because your child wants to test your authority or manipulate you. This isn't a knock on your parenting skills or a sign that he'll be a rebellious teenager; it's a normal part of his development and growing ind...

How can I stop my child from teasing? The short answer is you can't. Every child teases, from the peekaboo of infancy to the "I'm going to get you!" round-the-sofa chases of early childhood. But you can stop your child from teasing too much or too harshly. Try giving your child these simple dos and don'ts:

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? The best course is to help him develop his emotional intelligence (loosely defined as the ability to cope with one's own feelings as well as those of others). This will enable him to sense when his teasing is mean-spirited, hostile, or simply inappropriate. Here are some tips:

A few hundred years ago, doctors believed baby teeth could be deadly. In one year alone in 19th-century England, more than 5,000 babies supposedly died of teething. Today, we know that teething isn't really dangerous. New teeth can make your baby cranky and uncomfortable, but the misery will soon pass. Here's what you need to know to help both of you get through this trying time. How can I tell ...

Why does my child bite her nails? Nail biting is one of the somewhat misnamed "nervous habits," which also include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. But anxiety is only one reason children bite their nails; your child might be doing so for a number of other reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit....

You're trying not to worry, but your child's third birthday is behind him -- and maybe his fourth or fifth -- and he's still in diapers. Don't despair. Learning to use the toilet is a skill much like learning to tie shoes or ride a bicycle, and it poses a different set of challenges for each child. Here are seven common problems and strategies for solving them. My child refuses to use the toilet...

Why does my child bite his nails? Children bite their nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. (None of these necessarily signals anxiety, so "nervous habits" is somethi...

Should I be worried that my toddler sucks his pacifier all the time? No. For children between the ages of 1 and 3, sucking on a thumb or pacifier is natural. It can help your child with new challenges, such as sleeping through the night, eating with the family, and going on a long car ride. Sucking is a life skill that your child began in the womb and perfected as an infant. As he becomes a todd...

Why does my child interrupt me so often? Small children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exists for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before he forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore the very concept of interrupting makes no sense to your toddler....

Why does my child interrupt all the time? Interrupting comes naturally to children because they tend to forget that other people have needs that are as important (or almost, at least) as theirs. Even if your child knows that she's supposed to wait for a pause in the conversation and say, "Excuse me," the protocol slips her mind because what she has to say feels so urgent at that moment. Your ch...

When your child acts up, often the best way to nip the behavior in the bud is to remove him from the activity at hand and give him some quiet time alone. This technique, known as time-out, is a great, nonviolent way to shape behavior. But the key to success is knowing the right time and way to introduce it. Here are six secrets to making the technique work. Understand what time-out is -- and isn...

Time-out is a method of checking misbehavior by removing your child from her current situation for a few minutes of quiet time. It's a great way to help your child calm down and regroup. Between the ages of 3 and 6, children are intensively learning rules and testing limits. Time-out can be particularly useful in establishing these, as long as you apply it consistently. Here are eight ways to make...

Anyone can make mistakes taking medication, but kids are especially vulnerable. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, half of all kids don't take their medicines properly. Of course, no one should expect a 6-year-old to read and follow the instructions on a box of cough syrup or pain reliever. It's up to parents and other caregivers to make sure kids take the right medicines in the rig...

It's not easy being a toddler. One moment your child feels as if he's king of the world; the next he's crying in rage and hurling a toy across the room. Like many parents, you may find it hard to cope with your toddler's outbursts of anger and frustration. But these times actually provide the best opportunities to teach a young child how to manage strong feelings and calm himself down. By helpin...

Long before you take your new baby home, you need to think about a crucial issue: Who will take care of her at times when parents are otherwise occupied? Whether you're staying at home or quickly going back to work, you can make sure your baby spends all day, every day, in a safe, nurturing environment. Many factors will influence your choice, including cost, convenience, and, most of all, your ba...

At home, you probably have your doctors' numbers posted near the phone and your child's medical records handy in case of an emergency. On vacation, you should be no less prepared. Here are some tips: Before You Go

It was spring of 1999, and Joshua Watson, a sixth-grader at Alvarado Intermediate School in Alvarado, Texas, had an unsettling decision to make -- whether to accept a five-day in-school suspension or be struck three times with a paddle. His offense: earning his 10th demerit point for forgetting to bring pencils to class. Joshua was getting good grades and didn't want to fall behind. So, with the c...

My child hits, kicks, and bites other kids. Should I be concerned? Not necessarily. Aggressive behavior is a normal part of emotional and behavioral development, and almost every child hits, kicks, and yells when he's overwhelmed by strong emotions. However, if your child is frequently aggressive or is prone to shows of extreme temper, don't dismiss it as "Kids will be kids." He should be beginni...

My toddler kicks, bites, and hits playmates. Should I be concerned? Not necessarily. Aggressive behavior is a normal part of emotional and behavioral development, especially among toddlers. Almost every child hits, kicks, and yells; toddlers and even preschoolers often bite when they're overwhelmed by strong emotions. Generally, you can expect your child's aggressive behavior to taper off by age ...

How can I tell if my child has a stuttering problem? Everybody has trouble speaking from time to time. We've all filled sentences with "um" or "uh" or stumbled through a nerve-wracking speech. But when a child has a stuttering problem, words can be a daily struggle. Stuttering usually starts between the ages of 2 and 5, but it can arise anytime before the teenage years. Watch for these signs: ...

If your child is old enough to have teeth, he's old enough to have tooth problems. For infants and toddlers, the biggest threat to dental health is baby bottle tooth decay. Here's what you need to know about this common -- but largely preventable -- problem. What is baby bottle tooth decay? Milk, apple juice, formula -- just about everything young children drink contains sugar. When a child drin...

In the first month of life, your baby's social life revolves around you. She's already familiar with your voice, which she could hear from inside the womb. One of her first images is likely to be your face as she is brought to the breast (or bottle). At her age, all she needs for optimum emotional and social development is an attentive parent, lots of touch, and love. Your baby may spend so much...

Until now, your baby has lived by the adage "out of sight, out of mind." If he couldn't see something, it didn't exist. As far as he was concerned, you disappeared every time you walked out of the room. And if a ball happened to roll under the couch, it might as well have slipped into another dimension. Now that he's in his seventh month, he's ready to make a mental leap. He's slowly coming to t...

This is the month for motion. Sitters become scooters, and scooters become crawlers. A baby who used to be glued to floor can suddenly go just about anywhere she wants, if she has the time and determination. She might even be able to pull herself up on a coffee table or couch, opening all sorts of new possibilities for exploration and mischief. You can encourage her new skills by giving her plen...

Not long ago, your baby was far too bewildered to have much of a social life. It's hard to connect with people when you have no idea who they are. Now she's really starting to notice people, and she likes what she sees. She's crying less and smiling more, especially when you come into view. She might even let out a full-bellied laugh when you play with her. She's becoming more active, more engagin...

Your baby used to live in his own little world, but he's quickly turning into a social butterfly. He's starting to join in conversations, and he uses sounds and gestures to encourage you to pick him up and play with him. (If he doesn't seek attention in these ways, be sure to tell his doctor or nurse practitioner.) He's just beginning to realize that people will respond to his actions. And the res...

For the first couple of months, the relationship with your baby was a one-way street. You gave her love and attention, and she soaked it in. She could smile and cry, but she never really tried to connect with you or the other people in her life. Now, in her fourth month, the relationship is finally starting to flow in two directions. She has the brainpower to know what she wants, and she's finding...

Your baby has a lot on his mind. Now that he's moving around, he faces all sorts of new decisions and dilemmas. Which part of the house should he explore next? What's the best way to get there? And what should he do once he arrives? He's also thinking harder about the world around him and his place in it. Even when he makes bad decisions -- why would he put oatmeal there? -- he's constantly buildi...

At this age, your baby's social circle isn't very large. Of all of the friends, relatives, and strangers who drift in and out of her life, she really only cares about a few key people. And you're one of them. Throughout the day, she'll make many attempts to get your attention and draw you into her world. Yelling may be one of her favorite tactics. When she screams for attention, the best thing y...

Your 6-month-old still has a limited social life. He can recognize his mom and dad, and he enjoys it when someone plays with him or talks to him. But at this age, he doesn't give much thought to other people. His notion of "love" may be primitive, but he still needs plenty of it. You should comfort him when he cries and give him lots of cuddles. At this age, it's impossible to spoil him. He just...

Your baby is on the verge of a scientific breakthrough. After many experiments, he's starting to realize that his actions have consequences. When he hits his mobile, it moves. When he lets go of his rattle, it falls. And when he cries, mom comforts him. He's learning that life isn't quite as random as it seemed. More important, he's learning that he has some control over his world. He's especial...

Your baby loves to move. It's almost as if she still remembers her cramped quarters from a few months ago and is making the most of her newfound freedom. She can get a surprising amount of exercise while lying on her back. Put her down on her blanket, and she'll probably kick and flap as if trying to take flight. She's not getting very far, but her excited squeals tell you she's having a great t...

Your baby lives in a perplexing world, but some things are coming into focus. New research has shown that your baby now has 20/60 vision, although his brain isn't able to process all of its visual information yet. For the first time, his eyes are working together, giving him the gift of depth perception. Now when he reaches for a toy, he's less likely to miss by a mile. His eyes can also track mov...

Your baby may spend a lot of time looking pensive, but she's not exactly a deep thinker. When she furrows her brow and purses her lips, she's more likely to be filling her pants than doing algebra. Still, she's starting to take some amazing mental leaps. For the first time, she's beginning to understand the wonders of cause and effect. She'll start to realize that her crib shakes when she kicks ...

Your baby's mind is becoming as active as his body. He's having important insights about himself, the people around him, and his surroundings. He's smart enough to remember the past and anticipate the future. He's also smart enough to feel bored and lonely. He shouldn't be left alone in his crib or playpen for more than a half-hour at a time. He needs regular opportunities to move around, play wit...

By now, your baby is moving towards all sorts of fun and mischief. Different babies have different methods for getting around. Some scoot on their bellies, some use their arms to push themselves backwards, and some have already mastered the classic forward crawl. However your baby decides to crawl, she needs your help to polish her skills, have fun, and stay safe. Watch her face as she works on ...

Your baby is full of emotions, and he's more than willing to put them on display. He can go from laughter to tears and back again faster than you can change his clothes. Dealing with his up-and-down feelings can be a tiring job, but there's an upside: If you don't like his attitude, just wait a few minutes. He'll soon have a new one. The more time you spend with your child, the happier he'll be....

Your baby's curiosity dwarfs her attention span. She'll be fascinated by just about everything -- for a little while, at least. She'll move from a toy to a book to another toy like a baby on a mission. She's trying to make sense of the things around her, and she's learning every day. Few missions in life are more important. Your baby may have a thirst for learning, but it's probably too early to...

At this age, your baby needs love about as much as he needs food. Your hugs, cuddles, and kind words are crucial for his physical, intellectual, and emotional growth. He knows it, too. Why else would he try so hard to win your affection? More than ever before, your baby really aims to please. He'll enjoy showing off new skills, and he'll beam with happiness when you say "way to go" or "good job....

Your baby continues to add new moves to his repertoire. He may now be able to crawl while holding something in his hand, opening up brand-new opportunities to put things where they don't belong. He might be able to spin around on his bottom, a move he'll practice over and over. He might also be able to stand briefly if you hold his hand. At his age, standing is usually exciting business. He'll c...

Gaga. Mama. Baba. Listening to a baby talk at this age is a bit like searching for diamonds in a rock pile. Real words will be surrounded by nonsense syllables. And even when you hear a word, it's hard to tell if he really means it. He may say "no" when he's thinking "yes," and he may say "mama" for absolutely no reason at all. He's still figuring out what his mouth can do. You should keep encoura...

Your baby's social life is getting more complex as the months go by. She's growing more aware of the people around her, and she's also starting to think about her place in the world. For her, a little awareness can be a confusing thing. As she sorts through new anxieties and conflicting emotions, she'll need your love and support as much as ever before. By the 10th month, she may have already en...

As you've watched your baby grow through her first nine months, you've probably discovered that she doesn't always do things by the book. She may develop some skills ahead of schedule while others lag behind. Now's a good time to remind yourself that she's working at her own pace. It's fun and helpful to know what to expect from month to month -- just be ready to be surprised. For most babies, t...

It's impossible to know all of the things that float through your baby's head. How many words does she recognize? What is she trying to accomplish when she puts oatmeal in her hair? And does she even remotely understand how much you love her? Your guess is as good as anyone's. You can't get into your baby's mind, but it's easy to see that she's getting smarter. Look at how she plays with her toy...

Your baby is at an active, exciting, and unpredictable age. Will he be content to crawl, scoot, and cruise through the month, or will he start walking before he turns one? About one in four babies take their first steps by their eleventh month. Meanwhile, other perfectly healthy babies don't start walking until month fifteen or sixteen. Early walkers aren't necessarily more athletic or coordinat...

Your baby's social life is growing richer and more complicated. She's really starting to see herself as an individual, a realization that will only feed her hunger for independence. She's also paying more attention to the different people around her. She can instantly separate the familiar faces from the strangers, a skill that may cause anxiety when out-of-town relatives stop by for a visit. Whil...

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