We have NEW hours! Be sure to check our location/hours page to see our new hours. We look forward to serving you!
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

Health News Results - 298

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Not all Asian-Americans are equally susceptible to the deadly damage of heart disease and stroke, new research suggests.

The risk of premature death is highest among Asian Indian, Filipino and Vietnamese subgroups, the researchers found.

For the study, investigators analyzed U.S. death records from 2003 to 2012 to determine aver...

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new version of an implantable heart pump could cut the risk of blood clots, bleeding and stroke in patients with advanced heart failure, according to a study funded by the device's maker.

The study included more than a thousand patients who received either Abbott Inc.'s HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or the HeartMate II....

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart patients who get a stent to prop open a blocked artery are typically put on a powerful anti-clotting drug and aspirin for a full year after their procedure.

Now, new research suggests these patients can safely drop the aspirin regimen after just three months, and lower their bleeding risk in the process.

"Even though this tre...

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who regularly down sugar-laden sodas, juices and sports drinks aren't doing their heart any favors.

A new study of more than 110,000 U.S. health professionals found that the more people drank sugary beverages, the higher their risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

People who consumed at least two per day were about one-t...

SUNDAY, March 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of aging Americans worried about heart attacks and strokes have for years popped a low-dose aspirin each day, thinking the blood thinner might lower their risk.

But new guidelines issued Sunday by two cardiology groups say that, for most adults, the practice may no longer be warranted.

The new heart health guidelines were i...

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eggs may not be all they've been cracked up to be.

A new study says eggs are a major source of dietary cholesterol and that cholesterol in the diet ups the risk of heart disease and premature death.

The researchers followed nearly 30,000 adults over three decades and found that eating three or four eggs a week was tied to a 6 percent ...

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A groundbreaking new study holds heartening news for older Americans.

Since the mid-1990s, the number of seniors who suffered a heart attack or died from one dropped dramatically -- evidence that campaigns to prevent heart attacks and improve patient care are paying off, Yale University researchers said.

The study of more than 4 mil...

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Think exercise has to be high-intensity to make a difference to your health? Think again. New research shows that even routine housework and gardening can help older women's hearts.

"For older women, any and all movement counts towards better cardiovascular health," said Dr. David Goff. He's director of the division of cardiovascular sciences...

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test used to detect a heart attack may often provide some misleading results, British researchers report.

In a new study of patients undergoing blood tests at a hospital in England, one in 20 people had high blood levels of troponin, a protein released into the bloodstream during a heart attack. But most of them had no clinical sign...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting is a leading cause of disease-related health loss in the United States, a new study says.

But bystander use of CPR and automated external defibrillators reduces the risk of death and disability.

"Cardiac arrest is unique because survival is dependent on the timely response of bystanders,...

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's truly never too late to begin exercising, new research shows.

Even for people who were "couch potatoes" in their youth, embarking on a regimen of regular exercise in middle-age can still greatly cut the odds for death from any cause, a major new study finds.

The study tracked the health -- and lifetime exercise patterns -- of m...

THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although Americans are suffering fewer heart attacks, the rate is dramatically increasing among those under 40.

In fact, 20 percent of people who have a heart attack are 40 or younger, a rate that has risen 2 percent a year for 10 years, new research reports.

Some of these people are now in their 20s and early 30s, said senior stud...

THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High testosterone levels can drastically increase a man's risk of heart failure and stroke-causing blood clots, a new study reports.

Men with a genetic predisposition to high testosterone levels have a nearly eightfold increased risk of heart failure and twice the risk of thromboembolism (blood clots that can block veins or arteries leading ...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Want a healthier heart? Get at least a fifth of your daily calories from your breakfast and stop watching so much TV.

Those are the conclusions of two studies to be presented next week at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).

Both studies were based on data on the living habits of 2,000 middle-aged and ol...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research uncovers more damage wrought by the opioid epidemic: Cases of a dangerous heart infection linked to injection drug use have spiked in recent years at an Ohio medical center.

Researchers found that admissions for infective endocarditis at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center doubled between 2012 and 2017, and that a 4...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Spending your golden years in a place with lots of trees and other vegetation can be visually pleasing – and it also might be good for your heart, according to a new study.

University of Miami researchers crunched the numbers to determine that nearly 250,000 Medicare recipients living in the greenest parts of Miami-Dad...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and severe obesity have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for early heart disease.

So says a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

"Parents need to know that some medical conditions raise the chances of premature heart disease, but we are learning...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Younger U.S. women are suffering heart attacks at a higher rate now than 20 years ago -- even while the picture has improved for younger men.

Those are the key findings from a new study of four U.S. communities, in which researchers report the heart attack rate among women younger than 55 has steadily inched upward since 1995. In contrast, th...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you have type 2 diabetes and you want to do your heart a favor, a new study suggests you should let your diet get a little nutty.

Folks with type 2 diabetes who ate five or more servings of certain kinds of nuts weekly dropped their odds of heart disease by about 20 percent, compared to people who ate less than a serving a month. A serving...

MONDAY, Feb. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Men and women who get hormone therapy during gender transition treatment may face a much higher risk for developing heart disease, new Dutch research cautions.

"In light of our results, we urge both physicians and transgender individuals to be aware of this increased cardiovascular risk," said study author Dr. Nienke Nota, a researcher in the ...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a 40-something guy and can't do 40 push-ups in a row, maybe it's time to do something about it.

A new study suggests the number of push-ups a middle-aged man can perform might be an indication of his overall heart health.

Men who can do more than 40 at a time have a 96 percent reduced risk of heart attack, stroke and heart ...

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're an aging baby boomer who thinks you can handle today's potent marijuana "edibles," the case of a man who had a heart attack after eating a pot lollipop should give you pause.

The 70-year-old patient had been taking heart medications and consumed roughly 90 milligrams (mg) of THC while trying to ease pain and aid sleep. That's a far g...

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart patients prescribed opioid painkillers when they leave the hospital may be less likely to get follow-up care and slightly more likely to die, a new study finds.

It included nearly 2,500 patients discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., after treatment for heart attack, sudden heart failure or both between...

THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Certain strains of HPV are known to cause cervical cancer and other types of tumors. Now, a new study raises the possibility that they might also contribute to heart disease.

Researchers found that among over 63,000 women, those infected with "high-risk" strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) were somewhat more likely to develop heart disease ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could the inflammation that drives psoriasis and other immune-linked illnesses be a major player in heart disease?

In a new study, certain psoriasis drugs appeared to help to keep arteries clear, suggesting such a link.

"Classically a heart attack is caused by one of five risk factors: diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, family...

FRIDAY, Feb. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thousands more deaths from heart disease and stroke could occur in England if Brexit goes ahead, researchers warn.

Fruits and vegetables play an important role in heart health, and the United Kingdom is highly dependent on imported produce, the authors of a new study explained.

Brexit -- the U.K.'s withdrawal from the European Union ...

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of U.S. adults have high blood pressure, heart disease or a history of stroke, a new report shows.

That figure is up sharply from what the American Heart Association (AHA) reported last year -- largely because of changes in the definition of high blood pressure. In 2017, guidelines lowered the threshold to 130/80 mm Hg, down fro...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men who partake in extreme exercise are not putting their heart health at risk, a new study contends.

Aging athletes who do eight or more hours a week of vigorous exercise have no greater risk of early death than people who work out less often, researchers found.

Extreme exercise included activities such as fast runnin...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- New research has found that women who have a heart attack, stroke or some other type of cardiovascular event before age 35 have twice the risk of going into early menopause -- which could create its own set of health hazards.

Menopause is the process in which a woman permanently stops having menstrual cycles. In many women, it...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who vape might increase their odds of suffering a stroke, heart attack or heart disease, a new study suggests.

Federal survey data revealed that compared with nonusers, people who use e-cigarettes have a:

  • 71 percent higher risk of stroke.
  • 59 percent higher risk of heart attack or angina.
  • 40 percent ...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a giant polar vortex sweeps down over most of the United States, bringing with it temperatures so frigid that frostbite and hypothermia can happen within minutes, doctors have some advice for those who dare to venture outside.

The swath of the cold freeze is so wide and deep that roughly 75 percent of Americans living on the U.S. mainland...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money worries may contribute to heart disease in black Americans, a new study suggests.

"Stress is known to contribute to disease risk, but the data from our study suggest a possible relationship between financial stress and heart disease that clinicians should be aware of as we research and develop interventions to address social determinan...

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Take a stand for a longer life.

Researchers say even a few extra minutes off the sofa each day can add years to your life span.

"If you have a job or lifestyle that involves a lot of sitting, you can lower your risk of early death by moving more often, for as long as you want and as your ability allows -- whether that means taking a...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Six hours: That's the minimum amount of sleep per night you need to help your heart stay healthy, new research suggests.

The study found that chronic lack of sleep and poor sleep quality raise the odds of fatty plaque accumulation in arteries -- a condition known as atherosclerosis, which increases the odds of heart attack and stroke.

...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A large, new analysis helps confirm that eating lots of grains, vegetables and fruit lowers your risk of dying early from cancer or heart disease.

When compared with those who consume very little fiber, people at the high end of the fiber-eating spectrum saw their risk for dying from heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and/or colon cancer...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Losing a job or taking a big pay cut is hard on more than just your checkbook -- it might drastically increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death.

A new study finds that people who endure large swings in income over the years are much more likely to develop heart disease or suffer a premature death.

"We found t...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After having a stroke, heart attack or cardiac arrest, people are less likely to be employed than their healthy peers, new research shows.

Even if they are working, they may earn significantly less than people who haven't had a stroke or heart event, the investigators found.

Although the majority of people who have one of these seriou...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After indulging in big, rich, holiday meals, cholesterol levels go through the roof, Danish researchers report.

After Christmas, cholesterol levels jumped 20 percent from summer levels among the 25,000 people studied.

Your risk of having high cholesterol becomes six times higher after the Christmas break, the scientists said.

...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that an occasional drink won't harm, and might even help seniors with heart failure.

Heart failure patients who drank in moderation -- a drink a day for women, two for men -- had an average survival that was a year longer than nondrinkers, the researchers found.

"My patients who are newly diagnosed with heart fai...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're thinking about making some health-related resolutions for 2019, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some suggestions.

"This is the perfect time of year for each of us to consider our personal goals, and how we can make positive health choices in the coming year," said AMA President Dr. Barbara McAneny.

"We encourage...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two common classes of type 2 diabetes drugs may lower blood sugar levels, but new research suggests those same drugs might boost the risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

The drug classes in question are sulfonylureas and basal insulin. Sulfonylureas cause the body to release more insulin. They're taken orally and have been used sinc...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's a significant rise in the risk of heart attack and stroke in older people in the months before they're diagnosed with cancer, a new study finds.

"Our data show there is an associated risk of ischemic stroke and heart attack that begins to increase in the five months before the cancer is officially diagnosed, and peaks in the month just...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who call 911 for a possible heart attack may get different treatment from paramedics than men do, a new U.S. study suggests.

Researchers found that ambulance crews were less likely to give recommended treatments, such as aspirin, to women with chest pain. Paramedics were also less likely to turn on their sirens while transporting female ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Whether it's the stress of choosing the right gift, drinking and eating too much, or fighting with relatives about politics, the holidays can be hard on your heart.

In fact, new research from Sweden found the odds of a heart attack jump nearly 40 percent on Christmas Eve.

"Traditional holidays were associated with increased risk of...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Exercising after a heart attack, even a long walk around the neighborhood, can be frightening for survivors. But those fears may be eased by new research that found regular physical activity could help keep them alive.

Many heart attack survivors initially worry that exercise or any type of prolonged activity that increases thei...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women often delay calling for emergency help when heart attack symptoms start, a new study finds.

Researchers in Switzerland found that women suffering a heart attack typically waited 37 minutes longer than men before calling an ambulance. And those delays showed no signs of improving over the 16-year study period.

One reason may be...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living in a neighborhood with lots of greenery just might protect your ticker.

"Our study shows that living in a neighborhood dense with trees, bushes and other green vegetation may be good for the health of your heart and blood vessels," said study author Aruni Bhatnagar, director of the University of Louisville's Diabetes and Obesity Cent...

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While completing a full marathon is a goal for many amateur runners, new research shows a shorter endurance race might put less strain on the heart.

To gauge stress on the heart among 63 amateur runners after they had run either a full marathon, a half marathon or a 10-kilometer race, the researchers assessed levels of certain proteins that ar...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The hearts of women who snore appear to become damaged more quickly than those of men who "saw lumber" at night, a new study suggests.

Evaluating nearly 4,500 British adults who underwent cardiac imaging, researchers also learned that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be vastly underdiagnosed among snorers.

This finding surprised s...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Love your time in the local sauna? Your heart may love it, too.

New research from sauna-loving Finland suggests that for people aged 50 and older, saunas may lower their odds of risk of dying from heart disease.

Specifically, just 5 percent of Finns in the study who spent more than 45 minutes in a sauna each week died of heart dise...

Show All Health News Results

Wellness Library Results - 8

A heart attack, like any other brush with death, can unleash intense waves of emotion. Many survivors feel scared and nervous, even though they're grateful to be alive. And unfortunately, many also slip into depression. Though feeling bleak may seem like a perfectly natural reaction to heart trouble, depression shouldn't be taken lightly. Left untreated, the condition can sap a heart patient's str...

The irony was as inescapable as the smoke. Here was Taku Ronsman choking on secondhand smoke at work every day in a city health department, where she gave advice on how to create a smoke-free workplace. Hard at work for the Brown County Tobacco-Free Coalition in Green Bay, Wisconsin, she developed chronic bronchitis from the cigarette smoke down the hall. The building -- which also housed the Ame...

We all owe our lives to the arteries that carry oxygen-rich blood from our lungs to our heart. If one of those arteries becomes blocked, part of the heart will begin to die. Doctors call this sudden blockage an "acute myocardial infarction," but it's also known as a heart attack. The pain of the attack itself may last for minutes or hours, but the roots of the problem often stretch back several d...

What is angina pectoris? Angina is temporary pain or discomfort in the chest that occurs when not enough oxygen-carrying blood reaches your heart muscle. (The term "angina" means "pain," while "pectoris" refers to the chest.) Sometimes angina feels like heartburn, the similar sensations you may get after eating a heavy meal. But if you feel this pain regularly, it may be a symptom of heart diseas...

"Driving that train/high on cocaine
Casey Jones, you better watch your speed ...
Come 'round the bend, you know it's the end
The fireman screams and the engine just gleams ..." -- The Grateful Dead Nearly four decades after the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia wrote the lyrics to "Casey Jones," the drug that inspired the song is enjoying a resurgence. More than 35 million Americans 12 y...

It happened so fast. Sharon Brooks, co-owner of the trendy but now-defunct Hamburger Mary's restaurant in San Francisco, was ringing out the cash register and trying to reach her son's girlfriend on the phone. But when the young woman answered, all that came out of Brooks' mouth was gibberish. "I tried to talk and couldn't. I went into the bathroom and felt my left side tingling," says Brooks, wh...

Editor's note: Mike Ashland loved running. But after he moved from the San Francisco Bay Area to Oregon, and began working on a home renovation with his partner, he found himself more and more exhausted. Medical tests revealed that without his knowledge, he had suffered a massive heart attack that destroyed nearly half of his heart muscle. Within a month, Ashland went from being a marathon runner ...

Want to know how to avoid heart trouble? You can start by asking a nurse. Or, better yet, about 84,000 nurses. A 14-year study of 84,129 nurses -- published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2000 -- provides a blueprint for protecting the heart. You don't have to be a medical professional to follow it, either. No matter your age, your gender, or your past lifestyle, now's the time to start...

Show All Wellness Library Results