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Health News Results - 139

TUESDAY, Nov. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despair, as evidenced in rising rates of drug abuse and suicide, may be eroding the average life expectancy of Americans, a new study finds.

Deaths among working-age adults, especially, have been increasing in the United States for decades, particularly in economically struggling parts of the nation such as the "Rust Belt" and Appalachia, the...

THURSDAY, Nov. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Forty-one states and territories have seen drops in obesity rates among young children enrolled in a U.S. nutrition program, a new study shows.

"Improvements in national, state and caregiver guidance around nutrition and physical activity may be contributing to this decline in childhood obesity," said Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the U.S...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. counties hit hardest by the recession of 2008-2009 had a larger increase in heart disease deaths among middle-aged adults than other counties, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed 2010 to 2015 heart disease death rates among adults ages 25 to 64, as well as economic markers such as income, access to housing and levels of education.<...

TUESDAY, Nov. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Traumatic experiences in childhood can do lifelong harm to physical and mental health, education and work, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says.

Preventing traumatic childhood experiences -- such as abuse, seeing violence or substance abuse in the home, or having a parent in jail -- could reduce many problems later on...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Married people, especially women, benefited more than singles after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded Medicaid insurance coverage in the United States, a new study finds.

The ACA allowed states to expand Medicaid coverage for adults, and 25 did so by 2014. Since then, coverage rates have increased more in expansion states than elsewher...

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fresh foods can be expensive, especially if you're trying to go organic. But if you want to eat healthier by skipping processed, packaged foods, it is possible to keep costs under control and still get in the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Economic Research Service found that you can ...

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly a third of U.S. heart patients die at home, which is more than the number who die in the hospital, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data on more than 12 million heart disease patients who died between 2003 and 2017. They looked at whether the deaths occurred in a hospital, home, nursing or long-term care facility, inpati...

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Married folks not only live longer than singles, but the longevity gap between the two groups is growing, U.S. government health statisticians report.

The age-adjusted death rate for the married declined by 7% between 2010 and 2017, according to a new study from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), part of the U.S. Centers f...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money may not buy happiness, but a bigger paycheck is good for your heart. And new research suggests the reverse is also true: When income drops, your risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure goes up.

"One could argue that the fraying social and economic fabric of American society is, quite literally, killing us," said Dr. Edward Havr...

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When young adults see their annual income plummet, more than their bank accounts may suffer: New research suggests their brains may eventually pay the price.

The study found that people in their 20s and 30s who experienced "income volatility" generally performed worse on tests of thinking and memory skills once they hit middle age.

...

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could living near the coast be an inexpensive balm for mental troubles?

"Our research suggests, for the first time, that people in poorer households living close to the coast experience fewer symptoms of mental health disorders," said researcher Dr. Jo Garrett, from the University of Exeter, in England.

"When it comes to mental heal...

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 1 in 10 U.S. seniors doesn't have enough food to eat, a new study shows.

And for those under 65 who qualify for Medicare because they're disabled, 4 of 10 may be going hungry, the researchers added.

"People are always talking about Medicare and how to tweak it and improve access to care, but these kinds of social problems [h...

FRIDAY, Sept. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), nearly 2 million diabetics, many of them poor, got health insurance, a new study shows.

"Insurance coverage can change the health trajectory of people with diabetes by providing access to diagnosis and treatment," said lead researcher Rebecca Myerson. She is an assistant professor of population health scie...

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are a senior who is poor or from a minority group, the chances may be higher that you could receive a cancer diagnosis in the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Cancer is typically diagnosed by a specialist, but 20% to 50% of cancers are only caught during an ER visit, researchers said.

"Emergency room detection ...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol taxes do little to reduce the burden on American taxpayers for the harmful impacts of heavy drinking, a new study finds.

The cost of harm caused by excessive drinking in the United States is just over $2 per drink, with about 80 cents of that shouldered by government. But state and federal alcohol taxes bring in an average of about...

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer takes a huge emotional toll on patients, but a new study finds the financial costs are also so high that many are resorting to crowdfunding to help pay their medical bills and related costs.

"The financial consequences of cancer care for patients and their families are substantial," said senior and corresponding author Dr. Benjamin Br...

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide continues to become more common in the United States, with rural areas hit hardest by this ongoing crisis of despair, a new study reports.

Deprivation, isolation and lack of access to mental health care all appear to be driving the crisis in rural America, said lead researcher Danielle Steelesmith. She's a postdoctoral fellow at Ohio S...

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Growing up in a poor neighborhood significantly increases kids' odds of becoming obese adults, and the risk is highest among teens, a new study says.

It found that children from poor neighborhoods had 31% higher odds for adult obesity, and the risk was much higher (29%) among 11- to 18-year-olds than for younger children (13%).

...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study helps confirm a dismal reality: Poor Americans are more likely to die from heart failure than their richer counterparts.

The likely reasons? According to the researchers, higher obesity rates and associated increases in type 2 diabetes appear to be driving two-thirds of the trend.

"This study underscores the disparitie...

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure exacts a far greater toll on poor people than it does on affluent Americans, a new, national study finds.

The data from the clinical trial, which was designed to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), showed that poor people were half as likely to have their blood pressure controlled over the course of six years. They...

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They're gaining in popularity among women, and a new study finds menstrual cups to be just as safe and as effective as disposable pads or tampons.

British researchers looked at data on the cost-saving devices, gleaned from 43 studies involving more than 3,300 women and girls worldwide.

Reporting July 17 in The Lancet Public Hea...

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest is rare in children. But a new study finds that if it does happen, kids are less likely to get life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if they're black and living in a poor neighborhood.

In fact, these kids were much less likely to receive CPR from a bystander than white children living in any type of neighborhood, th...

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Clever websites and smartphone apps have made creating a household budget easier, though it's still an unappealing chore for some. But what if using a tool that makes you smarter about money could also make you happier? That would make budgeting a lot more attractive.

What's the connection? Budgeting causes you to rethink spending decisions...

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink alcohol don't only put themselves at risk, they're also endangering family and friends.

A new study finds the effects of "secondhand" alcohol harms are widespread, with nearly 1 in 5 Americans -- 53 million people -- reporting having been harmed by someone else's drinking during the past year.

Those harms include threa...

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you struggle with infertility, chances are you will be twice as likely to get treatment for the heartbreaking condition if you are white, college-educated or affluent.

So claims a new study that analyzed data from more than 2,500 women aged 20 to 44 who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2013 and ...

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors often face intellectual and financial struggles, a new study finds.

Advances in treatment have prolonged the lives of many childhood brain tumor patients, but survivors may have to contend with a number of effects from the disease and its treatment, the researchers noted.

To learn more, the...

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a link that few might consider, but new research suggests young adults who worry about affording groceries may be more likely to suffer migraines.

The study, of nearly 15,000 Americans aged 24 to 32, found that migraines were common among those reporting "food insecurity." About one-quarter said they'd been diagnosed with the headaches...

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of U.S. cancer survivors have chronic pain, and 1 in 6 have levels that restrict their daily activities, a new study finds.

"The prevalence of chronic pain and high impact chronic pain among cancer survivors in our study was almost double that in the general population, suggesting there are important unmet needs in the large and gr...

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Believe it or not, how your kid acts in kindergarten might impact his earning potential years later, a new study suggests.

Canadian researchers found that boys and girls who were identified by their kindergarten teachers as inattentive earned nearly $1,300 less a year than their more focused peers.

Additionally, boys identified ...

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a job can be a boon to mental well-being, but for many of us, it only takes one day of work per week, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 70,000 adults in the United Kingdom, found that when unemployed people found a job, their mental health typically improved. But, on average, it only took eight hours of work per week -- w...

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fifty-six of America's 500 biggest cities have major gaps in life expectancy between neighborhoods, a new study reveals.

These gaps can mean people in one neighborhood live 20 to 30 years longer than those just a mile away -- and the inequalities are prevalent in cities with high levels of racial and ethnic segregation, according to New York U...

SUNDAY, June 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eight of every 10 American households buys sodas and other sugary drinks each week, adding up to 2,000 calories per household per week, new research shows.

To put that in perspective, 2,000 calories is equal to the recommended average caloric intake for an adult for an entire day.

With the obesity epidemic ...

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The seniors most likely to need paid home care to maintain independent living are the least likely to be able to afford it long-term, a new study reports.

Only two out of five older adults with significant disabilities have the assets on hand to pay for at least a couple of years of extensive in-home care, researchers found.

Without...

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If someone you know is struggling to keep track of their finances as they age, early dementia might be the culprit.

That's the conclusion of researchers who tested 243 adults, aged 55 to 90, on their financial skills and performed brain scans to assess the buildup of beta-amyloid plaques, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

...

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If England's 2008 financial crisis was any indication, self-harm often follows economic ruin.

Researchers examined self-poisoning (which largely means drug overdoses) and self-injury events in three British cities and found that one-quarter of all self-harm emergency department visits were made by men and women aged 40 to 59.

Risk of...

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to opioid addiction treatments, money and race matter, researchers say.

White, wealthy Americans are much more likely to receive medication for their addiction than minorities and the poor, the new study found.

Racial and financial differences have only grown wider as the opioid crisis in the United States has worsene...

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tackling climate change makes economic sense, a new report claims.

The cost of cutting carbon emissions -- enough to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement -- would be offset by reductions in health problems and deaths caused by air pollution, the researchers found.

"These health 'co-benefits' of climate change policy are wide...

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows about cellphones and the threat of distracted driving. But how about distracted shopping?

Using your cellphone while shopping might make you susceptible to buying stuff you didn't intend to buy, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that people who used cellphones while shopping were more likely to forget what they we...

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being bullied as a youngster may lead to lifelong struggles in adulthood.

New research warns that victims of teenage bullying face a 40% greater risk for mental health problems by the time they hit their mid-20s.

Young adults with a history of adolescent bullying may also see their odds for unemployment spike by 35%, invest...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

<...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A decade from now, more than half of middle-class seniors in the United States will be unable to afford needed housing and personal assistance, a new study contends.

The number of middle-income people over 75 will nearly double to 14 million by 2029, up from about 8 million today, projections show.

About 54% of these seniors ...

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many American women feel less welcome at work once they become pregnant, a new study finds.

On the other hand, expectant and new fathers often get a career boost.

"We found that pregnant women experienced decreased career encouragement in the workplace only after they disclosed they were pregnant," said study author Samantha Pausti...

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just a 1% decrease in the number of Medicaid recipients who smoke could save the insurance program billions of dollars a year, a new study suggests.

Over one year, that small decline in smoking and its associated health harms would lead to $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year and millions for each state, researchers f...

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For women who deliver a baby by cesarean section, the risk of developing a surgical site infection is higher if she is covered by Medicaid versus private insurance, a new study finds.

Several factors may be at play, including a patient's living situation and social support after leaving the hospital, as well as differences in the type of c...

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many older adults, including those who are mentally impaired, don't lock up their guns and ammo, University of Washington researchers report.

Almost 39% of the more than 4,400 seniors they surveyed in Washington state said they had a firearm in their home. Nearly a quarter said they keep at least one gun loaded and unlocked. Fewer than a...

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty may influence how genes function, researchers report.

Specifically, they found that poverty is associated with levels of DNA methylation -- which can shape gene expression -- in nearly 10% of genes.

The findings are significant for a number of reasons, the researchers said.

"First, we have known for a long ti...

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The link between paychecks and mental health just got a little stronger.

New research suggests that raising the minimum wage might slow the rate of suicides in the United States.

The review of all 50 states found that between 2006 and 2016, increasing a state's minimum wage by a dollar was linked to a decrease in that state's rate o...

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bringing home a bundle of joy really can make your life better, as long as money isn't too tight, new research suggests.

Previous studies have found that having children might reduce adults' happiness.

In the new study, researchers analyzed data from surveys of 1 million adults in Europe between 2009 and 2018. Respondents were aske...

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two medical groups have declared war on sodas and energy drinks by calling for taxes on what has become the leading source of sugar in the diets of children and teens.

In a new joint policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Heart Association (AHA) also recommended a host of other public policies, all aimed a...

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More American women had health insurance and access to care after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was fully in place in 2014, and poorest women benefited most, according to a new report.

For the study, researchers examined U.S. National Health Interview Survey data on insurance affordability, access to care and the use of preventive services --...