Get Healthy!

Results for search "Hormones: Misc.".

Health News Results - 58

Could the Pill Reduce Asthma Attacks?


Women with asthma may suffer fewer severe symptom attacks if they are on birth control pills, a large new study suggests.

The study of more than 83,000 women with asthma found that those who used birth control pills for at least three years tended to have fewer severe flare-ups.

The difference between pill users and non-users was small, and the finding...

Transgender People Often Have Heart Risks: Study

Many transgender people who take hormone therapy have unaddressed risks for heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

These patients often have undiagnosed high blood pressure and high cholesterol, even in young adulthood, researchers found.

"Previous research has shown that transgender individuals are less likely to have access to health care or to utilize health care for a vari...

'Love Hormone' Could Hold Key to Treating COVID

The so-called love hormone, oxytocin, may be worth investigating as a treatment for COVID-19, a new study suggests.

One of the most serious complications of infection with the new coronavirus is a "cytokine storm," in which the body attacks its own tissues.

There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for COVID-19, which means that "repurposin...

Thyroid Drug May Not Help After Heart Attack: Study

If a heart attack survivor also has an underactive thyroid, treating them with supplemental thyroid hormone probably won't help, new research shows.

The study found that use of the hormonal drug, called levothyroxine, didn't improve heart muscle function in heart attack patients diagnosed with "subclinical hypothyroidism" -- an underactive thyroid.

In fact, "screening for an...

Stressful Days, Worse Blood Sugar Control for People With Diabetes

When something as routine as grocery shopping might lead to a deadly COVID-19 infection, stress is inevitable -- and that extra tension can make it harder for people with diabetes to manage their disease.

The reason? The stress hormone cortisol is linked to higher blood sugar levels, according to a new study.

Under stress, the body releases cortisol, which leads to an inc...

'Broken Heart Syndrome' Has Risen During Pandemic: Study

Doctors at one Ohio hospital system have discovered yet another possible consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: More cases of "broken heart syndrome."

The condition -- which doctors call stress cardiomyopathy -- appears similar to a heart attack, with symptoms such as chest pain and breathlessness. But its cause is different: Experts believe it reflects a temporary weakness in the hear...

Hormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in Women

Women have more Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain than men, and this may be linked to hormonal disruptions at menopause, researchers say.

"About two-thirds of people living with Alzheimer's are women, and the general thinking has been it's because women tend to live longer," said study author Lisa Mosconi of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.

"Our findin...

'Stress Hormone' Levels May Indicate Severity of COVID-19

High levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with an increased risk of death among COVID-19 patients, according to a new study.

The findings could be used to identify COVID-19 patients who are more likely to require intensive care, the researchers suggested.

Cortisol levels can rise when the body is stressed due to illness. High levels are dangerous, leading to...

Not a Myth -- Contraceptives Can Cause Weight Gain

Genetics may explain why some women gain weight when using a popular method of birth control, researchers say.

"For years, women have said that birth control causes them to gain weight but many doctors failed to take them seriously," said lead study author Dr. Aaron Lazorwitz. He's assistant professor of obstetrics/gynecology and family planning at the University of Colorado School of...

Prostate Cancer Drug Could Be 'Game Changing,' Researchers Say

For men with advanced prostate cancer, a new hormone therapy pill works better than standard injections -- and carries a much lower risk of heart attack or stroke, a clinical trial has found.

The drug, called relugolix, is not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If it gets the green light, however, it would be "game-changing," said Dr. Neal Shore, lead researcher on...

Could a Hormone Help Spur High Blood Pressure?

Many people with high blood pressure may have an unrecognized hormonal condition driving their numbers up, a new study suggests.

The condition, called primary aldosteronism, arises when the adrenal glands overproduce the hormone aldosterone. That causes the body to retain sodium and lose potassium, spurring a spike in blood pressure.

Doctors have long considered the conditio...

Drug Might Curb Dangerous Urges in Pedophiles: Study

A testosterone-lowering drug can reduce male pedophiles' risk of sexually abusing children, according to a new Swedish study.

The drug, called degarelix, is used to treat prostate cancer and turns off production of testosterone. It's given by injection every three months and can lower testosterone levels within hours, according to researchers.

The study included 52 male pedo...

Could Lower Testosterone Help Men Ward Off COVID-19?

Many drugs are being tested to fight COVID-19, but now researchers report that blocking testosterone might help prevent the infection in men.

Italian men with prostate cancer on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) were less likely to get infected with COVID-19 and had less severe cases if they were infected, the researchers found.

Lead researcher Dr. Andrea Alimonti, an onc...

Common Treatment May Not Help Seniors With Underactive Thyroid

MONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The medication Synthroid (levothyroxine) is often used to treat a condition called subclinical hypothyroidism, but a new study suggests the treatment might be a waste of time.

For the study, researchers followed 638 people aged 65 and older with subclinical hypothyroidism, also known as mild thyroid failure. About half of the patients were give...

Transgender Teens Have High Rates of Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

Depression, suicidal thoughts and self-injury are common among U.S. transgender teens, new research shows.

The study also found that hormone therapy leads to significant improvements in gender dysphoria -- the feeling of being uncomfortable with the gender they were assigned at birth.

For the study, the researchers analyzed the medical records of 158 transgender teens treate...

A Woman's Guide to Skin Care During and After Menopause

People sometimes refer to menopause as "the change of life," but many women are surprised that one of the things that changes is their skin, an expert says.

"Although fluctuating hormones during menopause can result in a number of skin changes, these don't need to be disruptive to daily life," said New York City dermatologist Dr. Diane Berson. "With the right care, women can continue ...

Mom-to-Be's Cosmetics Chemicals Could Lead to Heavier Baby

When pregnant women use cosmetics containing parabens, their children may have a greater likelihood of becoming overweight, a new study suggests.

Parabens are chemicals that have long been used as a preservative in cosmetics and body care products. A number of studies have suggested that parabens mimic estrogens in the body and may disrupt the normal function of hormones.

In...

High Testosterone Levels Have Different Health Impact for Men and Women

High levels of the sex hormone testosterone may trigger different health problems in men and women, a new study reveals.

In women, testosterone may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, while in men it lowers that risk. But high levels of testosterone increase the risk for breast and endometrial cancer in women and prostate cancer in men, the researchers reported.

"Our fi...

Is Suppressing Puberty the Right Course When a Child Questions Their Gender?

Suppressing puberty in a child who's questioning their gender identity might seem extreme, but the therapy is relatively safe and could significantly lower their risk of suicide, a new study reports.

Adolescents who wanted and received puberty suppression were 60% less likely to have considered suicide within the past year and 30% less likely to consider suicide throughout lif...

Regular Exercise Cuts Odds for 7 Major Cancers

Exercise may reduce the odds you'll develop any of seven types of cancer -- and a new study suggests the more you exercise, the lower your risk.

That's the conclusion of researchers who pooled data from nine published studies that included more than 750,000 men and women.

"We found that the recommended amount of physical activity was in fact associated with significantly r...

How Does Your Choice of Birth Control Affect Sexual Desire?

Many women use birth control pills or other hormone-based contraceptives to enjoy sex without fear of an unplanned pregnancy. But could they kill your mojo?

There has been some concern that a woman's sex drive can drop after starting a new form of hormone-based birth control. Sex drive studies involving the pill, the patch and hormone-releasing intrauterine devices (IUDs) have been m...

BPA Levels in Humans Are Underestimated: Study

Levels of the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in people's bodies are much higher than once thought, according to scientists who say they've created a more accurate way to measure them.

BPA is used in many plastic products, including food and drink containers, and animal studies have shown that it can interfere with hormones. Exposure to BPA in the womb has been linked to growth...

Birth Control Pill May Alter Part of Women's Brains

A small, preliminary study suggests that a brain area called the hypothalamus appears to be about 6% smaller in women who use birth control pills.

But exactly what that means isn't yet clear. In this study, women on the pill had statistically significant increases in anger. Researchers also found a possible link with depression symptoms.

The good news: They didn't see ...

Testosterone Supplements Double Men's Odds for Blood Clots: Study

Testosterone therapy appears to double a man's risk of suffering a potentially life-threatening blood clot, a new study warns.

Men had twice the risk for a deep vein blood clot if they'd been receiving testosterone during the previous six months, researchers reported in the Nov. 11 online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine.

The increased risk occurred whether or not a ...

More Hot Flashes Could Mean Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

Women, if you're bothered by frequent hot flashes, it may be more than a mere annoyance.

New research offers evidence that frequent or persistent hot flashes are linked to higher odds of heart attack and stroke. The finding stems from a 20-year study of about 3,300 women during menopause.

Of those women, 231 had a heart attack, stroke or heart failure.

Women who ha...

How to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent Fractures

If you're a young adult, start thinking about your bone health, an expert advises.

Most people reach peak bone mass -- the strongest bones they'll ever have -- between 25 and 30 years of age, according to Dr. Philip Bosha, a physician with Penn State Sports Medicine in State College, Pa.

"To some extent, genetics determines the peak, but lifestyle influences, such as diet an...

Some Transgender Women May Be Able to Make Sperm

Researchers are exploring fertility preservation in transgender women. And while they say there are no guarantees, they report it's possible to start producing sperm after stopping drugs that suppress maleness.

In a new case report, researchers found one of two patients produced sperm after discontinuing her puberty-halting medication. However, the other patient wasn't able to produc...

High Levels of Estrogen in Womb Might Raise Autism Risk

New British research is bolstering the theory that elevated levels of sex hormones in the uterus could play a role in autism risk.

Prior studies had already implicated higher uterine concentrations of male sex hormones -- androgens -- in increasing the odds for an autism spectrum disorder, noted a team led by Simon Baron-Cohen. He directs the Autism Research Center at the University o...

Plastics Chemicals Meant to Replace BPA May Not Be Any Safer for Kids

Manufacturers have been phasing out the plastics chemical bisphenol A because of evidence it might harm human health. Now a new study raises questions about the chemicals that have replaced it.

Bisphenol A, or BPA, has long been used in plastics. It was once in a wide range of products -- including the lining of food cans, food storage containers, water bottles and even the coating on...

Trans Women Have Raised Odds of Breast Cancer, But Risk Still Small: Study

Transgender women on gender-confirming hormone therapy have increased odds of breast cancer, but the overall risk is low and not as high as it is for the general female population, a new study finds.

Trans women are those who were declared male at birth but identify as female.

Previous research has shown that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases breast cancer risk in ...

Testosterone Supplements Not All They're Cracked Up to Be

SATURDAY, May 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Buyer beware: When it comes to testosterone supplements, men should know a new study finds there is precious little evidence to support claims they will boost testosterone levels, sex drive, strength and overall energy.

To come to this conclusion, the researchers first broke down 50 testosterone supplements into th...

About 1 in 1,000 Babies Born 'Intersex,' Study Finds

Cases in which a newborn's genitals make it unclear whether the child is a boy or girl may be more common than once believed, researchers say.

One example of what's known as ambiguous genitalia is a baby girl with an enlarged clitoris that looks more like a small penis, the study authors explained.

In some cases, infants have external sex organs that don't match their intern...

Could Common Heart Meds Lower Prostate Cancer Risk?

Good news for men: That blood pressure medication you're taking might be doing double duty, helping reduce your risk of developing prostate cancer, a new study shows.

Researchers found that a beta blocker called atenolol cut men's risk of intermediate-grade prostate cancer about in half, compared with men not taking a beta blocker.

It also appeared to significantly reduce th...

Treatments Targeting Social Behavior Hormone Show Promise With Autism

Hormone-based treatment might improve social function in people with autism, a pair of new clinical trials suggests.

Both focused on vasopressin, a hormone that has been implicated in the brain's ability to manage social behavior.

In the first trial, vasopressin given as a nasal spray helped improve social responsiveness in kids with autism, said lead researcher Karen Parker...

Male-Hormone Gene May Help Cause Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common cause of infertility and type 2 diabetes, but little is known about its origins. Now, new research suggests a gene involved in male hormone production plays a big role in the disorder's development.

"We're starting to make headway on what causes PCOS [polycystic ovary syndrome]. It's very frustrating for patients because it's poorly understood," ...

Study Supports Radiation for Early, Hormone-Driven Breast Cancer

For women with hormone-driven breast cancer, adding radiation to hormone therapy might keep their cancer from coming back for up to a decade, a new study finds.

Breast cancer didn't come back in the same breast for 97.5% of women who had radiation therapy plus hormone therapy compared to just over 92% of women who had hormone therapy alone, the researchers said.

In ...

Could Common Food Preservative Make People Fat?

If you're watching your weight, you probably know to avoid sugary and fatty foods. But what about preservatives?

Eating a preservative widely used in breads, baked goods and cheese may trigger metabolic responses that are linked to obesity and diabetes, an early study suggests.

The additive, called propionate, is actually a naturally occurring fatty acid produced in the gut....

Fewer Periods May Mean Higher Dementia Risk

A new study suggests that the fewer menstrual periods a woman has in her lifetime, the higher her risk of dementia -- though the reasons, for now, are unclear.

The study was based on close to 16,000 women. It found that those who started having periods at age 16 or later were more likely to develop dementia than women who started menstruating at a more typical age.

The same ...

Supplemental Steroids, Testosterone May Lower Men's Sperm Counts

Men who abuse hormones such as testosterone or steroids for bodybuilding can have declines in sperm and testosterone production, researchers say.

The good news: these changes seem to reverse once men stop hormone overuse.

While the use of nonprescribed male hormones (androgens) has surged in many wealthy countries, there has been little research into their effect on men's r...

Opioid Overuse Can Lower Hormones to Harmful Levels

Add one more issue to the growing list of harms from opioid abuse: Long-term use may lead to hormone deficiencies that affect a man's health.

Researchers reviewed the latest medical evidence and found that about two-thirds of men using opioids for more than six months develop hypogonadism, which is insufficient testosterone production.

The review also found that about one in...

Science Finds a Way for Transgender Males to Maintain Fertility

People transitioning female to male face issues around future fertility. But new research suggests children in the future are a real possibility for these transgender men.

Now, research shows that transgender men can remain fertile after even one year of testosterone treatment.

It's common for transgender men -- those who were born female but who i...

Sperm DNA Damage May Lead to Repeat Miscarriages: Study

When couples experience recurrent pregnancy loss, it's natural for them to want to know why. Now, a new study suggests that sperm DNA damage could be a factor.

Recurrent pregnancy loss is defined as the consecutive loss of three or more pregnancies before 20 weeks' gestation. It affects up to 2 percent of couples and, in many cases, it is difficult to ident...

Hormonal Therapy for Prostate Cancer Might Raise Depression Risk

Hormonal treatment can help control prostate cancer but may increase a man's risk of depression, a new study by Danish researchers suggests.

Male hormones, such as testosterone, are known to fuel the growth of prostate tumors. So doctors use drugs to reduce hormone production. But that can bring on tough side effects, such as incontinence or impotence.

The new study found ...

Could Male Twin's Fetal Testosterone Bring Lasting Harm to His Sister?

Having a twin brother could put a woman at a lasting disadvantage, and exposure to his testosterone before birth may play a role, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data on 13,800 twin births in Norway between 1967 and 1978. Compared to women with a twin sister, those with a twin brother were 15 percent less likely to finish high school and nearly 4 percent less likely to com...

High Testosterone Levels Are Bad News for the Heart

High testosterone levels can drastically increase a man's risk of heart failure and stroke-causing blood clots, a new study reports.

Men with a genetic predisposition to high testosterone levels have a nearly eightfold increased risk of heart failure and twice the risk of thromboembolism (blood clots that can block veins or arteries leading to the brain or lungs), researchers found.

Happiness in Marriage May Rest in Your Genes

Your long-term happiness in marriage may hinge on the genes you and your partner bring to the union.

A Yale University study suggests marital bliss could be influenced by a genetic variation that affects oxytocin, the so-called "love hormone" that is involved in social bonding.

"This study shows that how we feel in our close relationships is influenced by more than just our ...

Poor Sleep Plagues Many Kids With Autism

Young children with autism are more than twice as likely to have sleep problems than typical kids or those with other developmental delays, a new study reports.

Several factors profoundly affect the sleep of 2- to 5-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), said lead researcher Dr. Ann Reynolds. They are more likely to resist their bedtime, have trouble getting to sleep, suffer f...

Beware of Stressful Events in the Evening

Stress in the evening may take more of a toll on your body than stress at other times of day, a new study suggests.

The reason? Later in the day, the human body releases lower levels of the hormone that helps ease stress, according to researchers from Japan.

"Our study suggests a possible vulnerability to stress in the evening," said study leader Yujiro Yamanaka, a medical ...

Tamoxifen at a Lower Dose Might Still Prevent Breast Cancer's Return

Tamoxifen is considered a vital weapon in the fight against breast cancer, but many women who have to take the drug struggle with its significant side effects.

Now, new research shows that a lower dose of the hormone therapy helped prevent breast cancer from returning and guarded against new cancers in women who had high-risk breast tissue.

On top of that, the lower dose -- ...

'Stress Hormone' Tied to Worse Memory in Middle Age

Middle-aged people with higher-than-average levels of the "stress" hormone cortisol may have fuzzier memories, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 2,000 adults, found those with relatively high cortisol levels in their blood tended to perform worse on memory tests.

They also showed less tissue volume in certain areas of the brain, versus people with average cortiso...