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17 Sep

A Single Session Of Aerobic Exercise Can Make You Smarter

Researchers say even a two-minute workout may boost your brain power

23 Apr

Your Diet and Dementia Risk

Certain food combinations may be bad for the brain, new study finds.

27 Jan

Is A Bigger Brain Better?

Brain size doesn't always matter when it comes to aging and memory.

Health News Results - 383

A Promising New Therapy Against OCD?


Noninvasive electrical stimulation of the brain, fine-tuned to specific "circuitry" gone awry, might help ease obsessive-compulsive behaviors, an early study hints.

Researchers found that the brain stimulation, delivered over five days, reduced obsessive-compulsive tendencies for three months, though in people who did not have full-blown obsessive-compulsive...

Doorway Study Reveals How Anorexia Changes 'Body Awareness'

A study that examined how people walked through doorways provides new insight into anorexia's effect on a person's body image.

It's long been known that people with anorexia overestimate their body size, but this study examined unconscious body awareness -- formally called "body schema." It's the innate ability a person has to orient themselves in a room and stop from bumping into objects...

Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory Loss

A rare brain disease that causes loss of language skills doesn't lead to memory loss, a new study finds.

The condition is called primary progressive aphasia and about 40% of people who have it have underlying Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers. Their study was published online Jan. 13 in the journal Neurology.

"While we knew that the memories of people with prima...

New Insights Into How COVID-19 Damages the Brain

New research offers a novel explanation for the long-term brain problems many COVID-19 patients experience.

Many coronavirus patients report headaches and "brain fog" for weeks or months after they recover from respiratory symptoms. It's been believed that these lingering neurological issues are the result of nerve cell damage, but the new study suggests that the virus may instead be str...

Arguing Taxes the Brain Much More Than Agreement, Scans Show

Brain drain: Arguing with others puts a lot more strain on your brain than agreeing with them, a new study finds.

"Our entire brain is a social processing network," said senior author Joy Hirsch, professor of psychiatry, comparative medicine and neuroscience at Yale University. "However, it just takes a lot more brain real estate to disagree than to agree."

The researchers, from Ya...

Get Fit in Middle Age to Boost Your Aging Brain

Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in middle age and beyond might help keep your brain healthy, a new study suggests.

"Our study suggests that getting at least an hour and 15 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity a week or more during midlife may be important throughout your lifetime for promoting brain health and preserving the actual structure of your brain," s...

Brain May Age Faster After Spinal Cord Injury

A new study supports the theory that people who suffer a spinal cord injury may also have accelerated brain aging that affects how fast they process information.

Those "cognitive deficits" are similar to those in older adults, according to research from the nonprofit Kessler Foundation in New Jersey.

Individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) have an increased risk for cognit...

Police Use of Neck Restraint Never Medically Appropriate, Neurologists Say

Despite training that teaches police officers to use neck restraints, there is no medical justification for the tactic, three neurologists write in JAMA Neurology.

The killing of George Floyd, who died in May 2020 after an arresting police officer pressed a knee to his neck for more than eight minutes, helped spark a nationwide conversation about racial injustice.

While Fl...

Vaping May Addle the Adolescent Brain

Teenagers who use e-cigarettes may be at increased risk of "mental fog," a new study suggests.

The study, of thousands of U.S. teens, found that those who vaped were three times more likely than their peers to report problems with concentration, memory and decision-making.

The findings mirror those of a recent study of adults by the same research team: Men and women who used e-...

Scans Reveal How COVID-19 Can Harm the Brain

Blood vessel damage and inflammation in the brains of deceased COVID-19 patients suggest the damage is not caused by the virus, but the body's immune response to it.

Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) consistently found signs of damage caused by thinning and leaky brain blood vessels in tissue samples from patients who died shortly after getting COVID-19.

...

What Loneliness Looks Like in the Brain

As COVID-19 continues to spread and people face more isolation than usual, researchers are noting the impact of loneliness on the brain.

A new study from McGill University in Montreal found a tell-tale signature in the brains of lonely people. Specifically, they discovered variations in the volume of different brain regions and how those regions communicate across brain networks.

"W...

COVID-19 Survival Declines When Brain Affected: Study

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients with brain complications such as stroke and confusion have an increased risk of death, a new study shows.

The findings could improve care and save lives during the pandemic, the researchers said.

"This study is the first to show that the presence of neurological symptoms, particularly stroke and confused or altered thinking, may indicate a more serious...

As Testing Costs Rise, Neurology Patients May Skip Screening

Rising out-of-pocket costs for neurological tests could lead many Americans to forgo them, researchers warn.

Their study, published online Dec. 23 in the journal Neurology, analyzed neurology care costs for more than 3.7 million people in a large private insurance claims database.

They found that average, inflation-adjusted out-of-pocket costs for diagnostic tests rose by a...

How Are 'Super Agers' Protected From Alzheimer's and Mental Decline?

Some older folks are still sharp as tacks and dementia-free well into their 80s and beyond. Now German researchers have uncovered a possible reason why: Their genes may help them fend off protein build-up in the brain.

The finding is based on a study of brain images of 94 participants, all aged 80 or older. They were characterized by the amount of tau protein tangles and beta-amyloid pro...

Drug May Boost Thinking Skills in People With Advanced MS

Researchers say a multiple sclerosis drug meant to slow physical disability also shows promise in improving mental acuity in people who are living with secondary progressive MS, an advanced form of the disease.

The new study found that people taking the drug, called siponimod, for one to two years showed improvements in "cognitive processing speed" compared to those who took a placebo.

Kids With Dyslexia May Have Hidden Strengths

There's growing evidence that children with dyslexia may have heightened social and emotional intelligence.

Along with showing that dyslexia may be much more complex than poor reading skills, new study findings add to previous research indicating that dyslexia is often linked with hidden interpersonal strengths.

"There are anecdotes that some kids with dyslexia have greater so...

A Better, Safer Way to Rid Some Kids of Seizures?

Children with tough-to-treat epilepsy now have another choice to help them live a life free of seizures, a new study suggests.

MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy, a minimally invasive procedure for kids who have drug-resistant epilepsy, is successful in more than half of all cases and has a short recovery time, researchers report.

To arrive at that conclusion, the inves...

Targeted Microwaves Probably Caused U.S. Embassy Illnesses: Scientists

Targeted microwaves were the likely cause of mysterious illnesses that afflicted staff and their families at U.S. embassies in Cuba and China, according to a U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report.

Symptoms included ear pain, intense head pressure or vibration, dizziness, visual problems, thinking difficulties and the perception of loud noise.

The phy...

'Smell Training' Might Speed the Sense's Return After COVID

Special training may help COVID-19 patients regain their sense of smell after suffering parosmia, a new British study suggests.

Parosmia is a condition where people have strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling a lemon, for example, you may smell rotting cabbage, or chocolate may smell like gasoline. Parosmia has been linked to COVID-19 and other viruses and hea...

Cocoa Might Give Your Brain a Boost: Study

Could the main ingredient found in chocolate super-charge your brain, help young, healthy adults think better, faster and more efficiently? Just maybe, according to a small new study out of Britain.

The finding is based on work with 18 healthy men, aged 18 to 45. All underwent brain scans and mental acuity tests after consuming a cocoa drink packed with high levels of flavanols. They are ...

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure Raise Odds of COVID Harming Brain

COVID-19 patients with high blood pressure or diabetes may be more likely to develop critical neurological complications, including bleeding in the brain and stroke, according to an ongoing study.

University of Pennsylvania researchers studied COVID-19 patients who had a head CT scan or MRI within their health system between January and April 2020. In all, 81 of the 1,357 COVID-19 patien...

Delirium May Be Only Sign of Severe COVID in Elderly: Study

Delirium is often the first symptom of COVID-19 to appear in older people, a new study finds.

They may have confusion with an altered level of consciousness, disorientation, inattention and other mental disturbances, but none of the other typical signs of the coronavirus infection, such as fever and cough, researchers say.

"COVID can operate through multiple ways to affect the ...

Anxiety Might Speed Alzheimer's: Study

Older adults with memory problems may progress to Alzheimer's more quickly if they are also suffering from anxiety symptoms, a preliminary study suggests.

It's common for people with Alzheimer's disease to have mood symptoms, including anxiety and depression. And some research has suggested those symptoms can, in older people, act as early indicators of the dementia process.

The new...

Childhood Lead Exposure Tied to Brain Changes in Middle Age

Middle-aged adults who had elevated levels of lead in their blood as children have brain structure changes, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed childhood lead exposure data on 564 participants in a long-term study of people who were born in the same town in New Zealand in 1972 and 1973.

The participants grew up during the peak era of leaded gasoline (late 1...

'No Recollection:' Woman Has Sudden, Unexplained Episodes of Memory Loss

Imagine standing at your bathroom sink, and then you suddenly find yourself in bed but you don't remember how you got there. Then you discover hours have passed, yet you have no memory of what happened during that time.

That frightening scenario happened to Amy Losak, 64, twice, once in October 2016, and then again in September 2020.

Losak, a health care public relations professiona...

Working Women Show Sharper Memory With Age

Women who work outside the home may end up with a sharper memory later in life, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among nearly 6,200 U.S. women aged 55 and older, those who'd worked for pay in young adulthood and middle-age were less prone to memory decline, versus those who'd stayed out of the labor force.

The link was seen whether women were married or single, or had ch...

Newborn Brain Bleeds Resolve by Age 2

Here's some good news for new moms: Babies born with asymptomatic brain bleeds have normal brain development by the time they reach the age of 2, researchers report.

MRIs were used to examine the brains of 311 newborns in the Early Brain Development Study at the University of North Carolina between 2003 and 2016.

Of those newborns, 26% were found to have asymptomatic subdural hemorr...

Upbeat Outlook Could Shield Your Brain

Being positive may help protect your memory as you age, a new study indicates.

Researchers analyzed data from almost 1,000 middle-aged and older U.S. adults who took part in a national study. The upshot: Being upbeat pays dividends.

Participants were assessed three times: between 1995 and 1996, 2004 and 2006, and 2013 and 2014. At each assessment, the participants describe...

Newborn Brains Don't Process Emotions Like Adults

Newborns don't have the brain circuitry to process emotions, a new study finds.

Brain scans of newborns found that the area of the brain that experiences emotions isn't connected in a mature way to areas that process visual or auditory stimuli, researchers say.

In adults, these connections enable us to feel fear when we watch a scary movie, or love when we see a spouse or family mem...

Fewer Painful Procedures Could Help Preemies' Brain Development: Study

Giving fewer needle sticks to premature newborns in the intensive care unit may improve growth of a key brain area, a new study suggests.

The thalamus relays sensory data from the body to the rest of the brain, where it registers as pain, touch or temperature.

For the study, researchers compared 86 premature infants who had a catheter placed in their central veins and cen...

Brain Hemorrhage Won't Stop This Teen From Voting

One thing most people can agree on, even in these divided times, is the importance of voting. And 19-year-old Aboubakar Konate from New York City is no exception.

Despite a brain hemorrhage that left him partially paralyzed in March 2018, Konate plans to make his voice heard this November by casting his very first vote.

"Even when I was a little kid, I would think, 'I have...

Staying Social Can Boost Healthy 'Gray Matter' in Aging Brains

Older adults who get together with friends, volunteer or go to classes have healthier brains, which could help them ward off dementia, according to a new study.

Researchers who used brain imaging to examine brain areas involved in mental decline found that greater social engagement made a difference in brain health.

Being socially engaged -- even moderately -- with at least one ...

New Drug Could Extend Life for People With ALS

An experimental drug combination lengthens survival for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), new research shows.

A previous clinical trial found that the two-drug combo -- called AMX0035 -- slowed progression of the neurodegenerative disease over six months.

The new clinical trial of 137 patients with the disease, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, found that ...

Nerves May Play Important Role in Autism

Autism may involve nerves that control touch, pain and other sensations as well as the brain, a new study suggests.

"More than 70% of people with autism have differences in their sensory perception," said researcher Dr. Sung-Tsang Hsieh, an attending neurologist at National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei. "For some people, even a light touch can feel unbearable while others...

Music Classes Strike a Chord in Kids' Brain Development: Study

Learning to play a musical instrument helps fine-tune kids' brains, researchers say.

In a new study, 40 children (aged 10 to 13) performed memory and attention tasks while their brain activity was monitored with functional MRI. This type of imaging scan detects small changes in blood flow within the brain.

Twenty of the children played an instrument, had completed at least t...

8 in 10 COVID-19 Patients Suffer Neurological Symptoms, Study Finds

As President Donald Trump battles the coronavirus, researchers reveal concerning new findings: Neurological symptoms occur in 8 of 10 hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

These symptoms include muscle pain, headaches, dizziness, encephalopathy and "brain fog."

"Encephalopathy, which is characterized by altered mental function ranging from mild confusion to coma, is the most sever...

Diabetes Drug Metformin May Protect the Aging Brain

A common type 2 diabetes drug called metformin may have an unexpected, but positive, side effect: New research suggests that people taking the drug appear to have significantly slower declines in thinking and memory as they age.

"Our six-year study of older Australians with type 2 diabetes has uncovered a link between metformin use and slower cognitive [mental] decline and lower deme...

Sleep Builds the Brain in the Early Years, Then Maintains It

For the very young, sleep builds and strengthens the brain, but it quickly switches to maintenance and repair before a child turns 3, new research shows.

Before about the age of 2½, the brain grows rapidly. And during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep a baby's brain builds and strengthens synapses, which connect neurons to each other so they can communicate.

After that, sl...

Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Everyone needs sleep, but too little or too much of it might contribute to declines in thinking, a new study suggests.

Too little sleep was defined as four or fewer hours a night, while too much was deemed 10 or more hours a night. The ideal amount? Seven hours a night.

"Cognitive function should be monitored in individuals with insufficient or excessive sleep," said study ...

A Good Workout Could Boost Your Thinking for Up to 2 Hours

A few minutes of moderate- to high-intensity aerobic activity -- like running or biking -- can boost young adults' memory and concentration for up to two hours, a new research review shows.

That's the takeaway from 13 studies published between 2009 and 2019. All looked at the short-term impact of bicycling, walking and/or running on the mental health of 18- to 35-year-olds.

...

PTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia Risk

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)may significantly increase the risk of dementia later in life, according to a new study.

The researchers found that people with a history of PTSD were up to two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never had PTSD.

"Our study provides important new evidence of how traumatic experiences can impact brain health, and how the l...

Smoking Ups Your Risk of a Fatal Brain Bleed

Smokers have a significantly raised risk of dying from a bleeding stroke, a new study warns.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from over 16,000 same-sex twin pairs in Finland. The twins were born before 1958 and followed for about 42 years (between 1976 and 2018).

During the follow-up, there were 120 deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This is a type of bleedin...

New Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's Risk

A genetic variant in some people may be associated with mental decline that can't be explained by deposits of two proteins linked with Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

They said their findings could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's.

The two proteins are amyloid β and tau. Amyloid forms into plaques and tau forms into tangles. Both are found in the brains of A...

Children Use Both Sides of the Brain to Understand Language

Adults process language on one side of the brain, but kids use both hemispheres, a new study suggests.

The finding might explain why children recover more easily from brain injuries than adults, the study authors added.

"This is very good news for young children who experience a neural injury," said researcher Elissa Newport. She's a neurology professor at Georgetown Univer...

Common Meds Tied to Faster Mental Decline in Seniors

A group of widely used medications might speed up older adults' mental decline -- especially if they are at increased risk of dementia, a new study hints.

The medications in question are called anticholinergics, and they are used to treat a diverse range of conditions -- from allergies, motion sickness and overactive bladder to high blood pressure, depression and Parkinson's disease.<...

Each Day Sober Slowly Helps Alcoholics' Brains Recover

A new brain scan study shows why the "one day at a time" approach works for recovering alcoholics.

"For people with AUD [alcohol use disorder], the brain takes a long time to normalize, and each day is going to be a struggle," explained senior study author Rajita Sinha, a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at Yale University's Child Study Center. "For these people, it really is ...

Teen's Democratic Convention Speech Brings Awareness to Stuttering

On the final night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, the world heard from an improbable source -- a 13-year-old named Brayden Harrington.

Brayden was invited to speak because he has a frustrating and misunderstood condition that millions of Americans share, including Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden.

"We stutter," he explained in a video recorded for the...

Rare 'Brain Vein' Strokes Are on the Rise

Most strokes strike when an artery in the brain suddenly becomes blocked, but new research shows a rarer cause of strokes is becoming more common.

It's called cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and it happens when a vein in the brain is clogged. While CVT is estimated to cause less than 1% of all strokes, scientists discovered it is now more prevalent and affecting a different demo...

Hearing Persists at End of Life, Brain Waves of Hospice Patients Show

Even if they appear unresponsive, dying people may still be able to hear.

That's the takeaway from a Canadian analysis of hospice patients in Vancouver.

Researchers compared electroencephalography (EEG) data -- a measure of electrical activity in the brain -- collected when patients were conscious and when they became unresponsive at the end of life. Those patients were comp...

Mediterranean Diet Might Lower Your Odds for Parkinson's

People who eat healthfully may be less likely to develop a constellation of symptoms that can precede Parkinson's disease, a large new study suggests.

Researchers found that people who closely adhered to a Mediterranean-style diet were about one-third less likely to develop at least three "prodromal" features suggestive of Parkinson's disease, compared to those who stuck with meat and...

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