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Parents, You Can Ease a Teen's Stress Around Standardized Tests

Standardized tests put a lot of pressure on teenagers who want to secure their future and make their parents and teachers proud.

This stress can lead to symptoms like stomach aches, sleep problems, irritability and heightened emotionality, experts say.

But there are concrete steps students can take to prepare for a standardized test while also keeping their cool.

Live ...

Parks, Forests Boost Preschoolers' Mental Health

Toddlers who grow up near nature are less likely to have emotional issues, even if the green space is just a park or a big back yard, a new study shows.

The more green space there is within three-fourths of a mile from a child's home, the fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression they'll hav...

Black and Native Americans Hit Hardest by 'Deaths of Despair'

More middle-aged Black and Native Americans are now falling prey to “deaths of despair” than whites, a new study finds.

These deaths -- from suicide, drug overdose and alcoholic liver disease -- initially had been more common among whites.

But a new analysis has determined that deaths of despair have skyrocketed for Black and Native Americans over the past decade.

The deat...

Antipsychotics Help Ease Episodes of Marijuana-Induced Psychosis

Overuse of marijuana is increasingly being linked to dangerous bouts of psychosis, and a new study finds that antipsychotics may be needed to keep such patients out of the hospital.

Psychotic episodes involve a dangerous psychiatric state in which people lose their c...

Rising Threat to Americans' Healthy Sleep: Neighborhood Gunfire

A good night's sleep is often hampered by caffeine, hunger, alcohol or chronic pain.

Now, America has a new cause of poor sleep: the sound of gunfire on city streets.

New research shows that gunshots are twice as likely to occur at night, mostly affecting the sleep of people in low...

Tough Work Hours in 20s, 30s Tied to Worse Health Decades Later

A rotten work schedule in young adulthood can affect a person's middle-aged health, a new study finds.

Young adults who worked shifts outside the usual 9-to-5 schedule were more likely to report worse sleep and symptoms of depression in their 50s, researchers discovered.

�...

Too Often, Postpartum Depression Goes Untreated in Black, Hispanic Women

Massive racial disparities exist in the treatment of pregnancy-related mood disorders in the United States, a new study shows.

White women suffering from depression or anxiety during or after pregnancy are nearly twice as likely receive treatment as women of color are, ...

Sports Gambling, Binge Drinking a Dangerous Duo for Health

People who gamble on sports are more likely to be binge drinkers as well, a new report finds.

Both women and men who bet on sports were at least twice as likely to binge drink compared to non-gamblers, results showed. Further, the odds of binge drinking increased with the frequency of gambling.

“With past research showing that sports gamblers are more likely to report symptoms of ...

Could the Keto Diet Help Ease Psychiatric Conditions?

Patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder tend to see their conditions ease after four months on the ketogenic ("keto") diet, a small pilot study finds.

While no one is saying the diet should replace standard medications, the researchers believe it could provide additional help for some.

“It's very promising and very encouraging that you can take back control of your illnes...

Big Improvements Seen in Spotting, Treating Mental Health Issues Around Pregnancy

Expecting or new mothers are much more likely these days to be diagnosed with anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows.

However, more women are also getting treated for these problems rather than roughing it out, researchers report in A...

Monthly Injection Curbs Opioid Cravings, But Few Treatment Centers Use It

A monthly long-acting injection of buprenorphine can be an easier and more effective therapy for people struggling with opioid addiction, but treatment centers aren't much interested in using it, a new study discovers.

Only one-third of treatment facilities (33%) offer long-acting buprenorphine injections to patients, according to findings published recently in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 1, 2024
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  • Telehealth May Help People Stick With Alcoholism Treatment

    Telehealth might be a more effective way of treating alcoholism than in-person therapy sessions, a new study reports.

    Alcoholics who receive treatment through telehealth were more likely to engage in more therapy visits and stick to anti-alcohol medication longer than those who venture out for alcohol use disorder therapy, researchers found.

    These results are “particularly importa...

    Steady Rise in U.S. Suicides Among Adolescents, Teens

    U.S. rates of suicide by all methods rose steadily for adolescents between 1999 and 2020, a new analysis shows.

    During those two decades, over 47,000 Americans between the ages 10 and 19 lost their lives to suicide, the report found, and there have been sharp increases year by year.

    Girls and minority adolescents have charted especially steep increases in suicides, said a team le...

    Mutation Helps Even Carriers of 'Alzheimer's Gene' Avoid Alzheimer's

    A genetic mutation that boosts cell function could protect people against Alzheimer's disease, even if they carry another gene mutation known to boost dementia risk.

    The newly discovered mutation appears to protect people who...

    What Is 'Mindful Reading' and Can It Help Your Brain?

    Ever immersed yourself in a book and lost all sense of the time and place you're currently in?

    That's how reading can meld with mindfulness, one neuropsychologist explains.

    The experience can bring real mental health benefits, said

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2024
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  • High Rate of Suicidal Thoughts Among Black Men in Rural America: Study

    Suicidal thoughts and contemplation of death haunt the minds of many rural Black men in the United States, a new study reports.

    One in three rural Black men said they had such dark thoughts within the past two weeks, University of Georgia researchers found.

    These thoughts are driven by childhood trauma, poverty and exposure to racism, all of which take a heavy toll on mental health ...

    FDA May Ban Electroshock Devices Used on Some Psychiatric Patients

    Federal regulators are taking a second stab at banning the controversial use of electroshock devices to manage the behavior of patients with intellectual and developmental disorders.

    The devices deliver electric shocks to a patient's skin, in an attempt to stop them from harming themselves or lashing out physically at others, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said in its Monday ...

    Many Kids Worry About Missing School Due to Illness: Poll

    Most parents are torn about letting their middle or high school students take a sick day.

    "In some cases, the decision to keep kids home from school is clear, such as if the child is vomiting or has a high fever," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the Mott Poll from University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children's H...

    Rare Condition Makes Others' Faces Appear 'Demonic'

    Some people diagnosed with schizophrenia might instead be suffering from a rare visual condition that can cause other people's faces to appear “demonic,” a new study argues.

    The condition, called prosopometamorphopsia (PMO), can cause others' facial features to appear horrific -- drooped, larger, smaller, out of position or stretched in disturbing ways.

    “Not surprisingly, peo...

    Body Dysmorphia Affects Many Teens, Especially Girls

    Many teens – especially girls – are affected by body dysmorphic disorder, a condition in which they become obsessed with perceived flaws in their personal appearance, a new study shows.

    BDD affects about two in every 100 teens (1.9%), according to a report published March 17 in the Journal of the American Acad...

    Common Epilepsy, Migraine Drug Won't Raise Odds for Autism in Offspring

    A common antiseizure drug used to treat epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorder does not appear to increase the risk of autism for kids exposed to it in the womb, a new study says.

    Topiramate does not contribute to any ri...

    Knitting Helps Keep Troubled Minds From Unraveling, Study Finds

    Stressed out, anxious or desperately needing to recharge?

    Grab some knitting needles and a pretty ball of yarn -- Swedish research shows yarncraft improves mental health without medication.

    "Knitters have a creative leisure interest that can also help them cope with life and so improve their mental health," said first author

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 21, 2024
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  • As Treatments Ease Anxiety, Heart Risks Also Decline

    People with heart disease can stay healthier if they address their emotional problems as well as their physical ailments, a new study says.

    Treating anxiety and depression reduced ER visits and hospitalizations among patients with heart disease, researchers ...

    U.S. Falls Out of Top 20 in 'World's Happiest Countries' List

    For the first time, the United States has fallen out of the top 20 spots on the annual world's happiest nations list.

    Americans are now No. 23, far behind the top five countries -- Finland (No. 1), Denmark, Iceland, Sweden and Israel. 

    "The...

    One in 10 U.S. School-Age Kids Have ADHD: Report

    About 1 in every 10 U.S. children ages 5 to 17 has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to the latest government statistics.

    The data from the National Health Interview Survey covers the years 2020 through 2022 and came from in-person or phone interviews involving a representative sample of American homes.

    It found that 11.3% of school-age c...

    Staying Social Vital for People With Alzheimer's, Caregivers

    People with dementia -- and their caregivers -- need active social lives to stay healthy, a new study reports.

    However, researchers found that both dementia patients and their caregivers had declining social connections as the disease progressed.

    Patients' social netw...

    Could Biofeedback Help Ease Long COVID?

    Breathing and relaxation techniques may offer relief to some patients battling Long COVID.

    In a new, small study of 20 patients, biofeedback therapy relieved both the physical and psychological symptoms of Long COVID, researchers said. Many participants had been dealing with symptoms for more than a year.

    "Our biggest hope is that we've identified a way to alleviate chronic physical...

    MRI May Predict Who'll Respond Best to Schizophrenia Treatment

    Specialized brain scans may accurately predict whether a psychotic patient will go on to develop treatment-resistant schizophrenia, Dutch researchers report.

    The scan -- called a neuromelanin-sensitive MRI, or NM-MRI for short -- zeroes in on a brain pigment called neuromelanin. This pigment c...

    Pooch Power: 'Relax' Brainwaves  Begin When Folks Play With Dogs

    Playing fetch or grooming Fido isn't just good for your precious pooch -- it also benefits your brain.

    Such interactions appear to strengthen brain waves associated with rest and relaxation, South Korean researchers report in the March 13 issue of the journal PLOS One. Their small study compar...

    Taking 'Study Drugs' Like Adderall Could Be Gateway to More Drug Abuse

    College students who use drugs like Adderall to help them focus on their studies may be setting themselves up for trouble.

    Researchers asked 700 undergraduates across the United States about drugs commonly used by students -- including ADHD medications like Adderall, cannabis, nicotine, alcohol, MDMA and ecstasy. They also asked about students' academic performance and physical and mental...

    Depression May Be Tougher on Women's Hearts Than Men's

    Researchers are zeroing in on the reasons why women who battle depression may be more likely than men to develop heart disease.

    A study published March 12 in the journal JACC: Asia underscores the need to tailor prevention and management strategies according to sex-specific factors, researchers said.

    This "may help in the development of targeted prevention and treatment str...

    ADHD Meds Cut Odds for Early Death, Especially by Overdose

    People diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show a marked decline in their two-year risk for death once they start taking medication, new research shows.

    That was particularly true for deaths due to accidents and drug overdose.

    People taking ADHD drugs also showed no higher...

    Medical Costs for Kids' Mental Health Jumped 31% in 5 Years

    The cost to American families of caring for a child with a mental health condition rose by almost a third between 2017 and 2021, a new report finds, to an average $4,361 per year. 

    Overall, American families spent an estimated $31 billion in 2021 on child mental health services, which now make up nearly half (about 47%) of all child medical spending, the report found.

    The findi...

    Kids Battling Mental Health Issues Have Tougher Time Recovering From Concussion

    Kids struggling with mental health problems have a tougher time recovering from a concussion, a new study finds.

    These troubled kids tend to have more emotional symptoms after concussion and take longer to fully recover, results show.

    In ...

    Embryo Technology Might Lead to Children With Genes From Two Men

    New technology might soon allow men in same-sex relationships to have a child genetically related to both dads, researchers say.

    The technology uses skin cells from one person to alter the genetics of a donated egg, researchers reported March 8 in the journal Science Advances.

    That egg can then be fertilized b...

    How After-School Programs Can Harm Teens' Mental Health

    Days clogged with numerous after-school activities are detrimental to the mental health of over-scheduled high school students, a new study finds.

    Researchers also found that these "enrichment' activities -- tutoring, sports, school clubs and even homework -- are unlikely to benefit students academically.

    Many folks think extra study time or tutoring will lead to better grades, but ...

    Analysis Showed Maine Mass Shooter Had Blast-Related Brain Damage

    The perpetrator of a mass shooting in Maine last fall had extensive brain damage from "thousands of low-level blasts" tied to his work at an Army Reserve hand grenade training range, a new report shows.

    On Oct. 25, Robert Card, 40, killed 18 and injured another 13 in a deadly rampage in the town of Lewiston after opening fire in a bowling alley and then a restaurant.

    After a two-da...

    Sport Coach's Style Can Boost a Player's Mental Health

    Athletes whose coaches are open, authentic and positive are more likely to have better mental health, a new study says.

    Athletes feel happier and deal with problems more easily if their coaches adopt an “authentic leadership” style, researchers report in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 7, 2024
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  • Many Can't Access Mental Health Services that Save Money, Keep People Out of Jail

    When it comes to giving at-risk Americans access to the mental health services they need, prevention is far better than detention, new research confirms.

    However, a majority of the 950 U.S. counties surveyed in the report do not offer access to the types of mental health and substance use disorder services that can save communities money and prevent incarceration.

    "Most co...

    Some Women Escape the Mental Health Effects of Menopause: Study

    Menopause is thought to trigger mood changes among women, with changes in female hormone levels contributing to anxiety, depression and stress.

    However, a new study says some women are at more risk than others for menopause-linked mental health issues, and many escape them altogether.

    There's no evidence that menopause causes a universal rise in risk for mental health conditions lik...

    Pets Bring People Big Mental Health Boost: Poll

    The vast majority (84%) of Americans with pets say their animal companion brings a positive mental health impact to their lives, a new poll shows.

    The poll of more than 2,200 adults conducted early last month also found about two-thirds of respondents calling their pet "a true friend," a "companion" and someone who "provide[s] unconditional love and support."

    That's according to a ...

    U.S. Deaths Linked to Alcohol Keep Rising, Especially Among Women

    Deaths where alcohol played a key role climbed sharply in recent years, hitting women even harder than men, new government data shows.

    Between 2016 and 2021 (the latest numbers available), "the average number of U.S. deaths from excessive alcohol use increased by more than 40,000 [29%], to 178,000 per year," reported a team from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    P...

    How Is Autism Diagnosed?

    According to the advocacy group Autism Speaks, one in every 36 U.S. children has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Early diagnosis is crucial to helping to treat the condition, but how is a diagnosis done?

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    1 in 5 People Who Attempt Suicide Have No Prior Mental Illness

    One out of every five adults who attempt suicide never met the criteria for a mental illness by the time the attempt happened, new research shows.

    “This finding challenges clinical notions of who is at risk for suicidal behavior and raises questions about the safety of limiting suicide risk screening to psychiatric populations,” concluded a team led by

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 27, 2024
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  • Firsthand Experience of Climate Change Disasters Is Stressing Teens

    Weather disasters driven by climate change are stressing out U.S. teenagers, a new study warns.

    Teens with the most firsthand experience of events like hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, droughts and wildfires were more likely to show signs of mental distress than peers who hadn't been confronted with the effects of climate change, researchers report.

    “We know that climate change has ...

    Mental Health Issues a Prime Driver of Deaths for New Moms: Study

    Data from dozens of studies supports the notion that mental health crises are a big factor behind rising rates of maternal deaths during and around pregnancy in the United States.

    “We need to bring this to the attention of the public and policymakers to demand action to address the mental health crisis that is contributing to the demise of mothers in America," said

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 26, 2024
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  • Grief Affects the Body, Not Just the Mind

    Of course grief can ravage your mind, but science shows it can also weaken your body, leaving you open to illness.

    “As humans, we are strongly motivated to seek out social bonds that are warm, dependable, friendly and supportive,” explained George Slavich. He directs the Laboratory for Stress Assessment and Rese...

    Hormone Replacement Therapy Could Ease Depression Around Menopause

    Hormone replacement therapy might help women avoid depression as they go through menopause, a new study finds.

    Women treated with hormone therapy at a menopause clinic in Ontario, Canada, experienced a reduction in their symptoms of depression, researchers report Feb. 21 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 26, 2024
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  • Food-Focused Toddlers at Higher Risk for Eating Disorders as Teens

    Toddlers who are really into their food might have a higher risk of developing an eating disorder once they enter adolescence, a new study shows.

    Kids ages 4 and 5 with a strong urge to eat when teased with tasty food appear more likely to report a range of eating disorder symptoms by ages 12 to 14, researchers report Feb. 20 in

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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  • Wendy Williams Diagnosed With Frontotemporal Dementia

    Former talk show host Wendy Williams has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia, her representatives announced in a statement on Thursday.

    The conditions are the same diagnoses actor Bruce Willis received in 2022...

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