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Adults With ADHD Face 4 Times the Odds for Anxiety Disorder

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not just a childhood disorder, and new research shows that adults with ADHD are four times more likely to have anxiety disorder.

"These findings underline how vulnerable adults with ADHD are to generalized anxiety disorders," said study author Esme Fuller-Thomson. She is a professor at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty...

Social Media Tied to Higher Risk of Depression

TUESDAY, Nov. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The latest in a spate of studies investigating links between use of social media and depression suggests the two go hand in hand.

"The relationship between social media and mental health has been the subject of a lot of debate," said Dr. Roy Perlis, lead author of the new study. He's director of the Center for Experimental Drug...

Vaping Could Weaken Your Bones, Study Finds

MONDAY, Nov. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The evidence against vaping is mounting, and a new study now links e-cigarettes with an increased risk for broken bones.

Over time, vaping appears to increase the risk for fracture of the hip, spine and wrist by 46%, according to the findings. Researchers said these fractures happen from falls while standing and even from lower...

Many Psychiatric Patients Are Getting Risky Drug Gabapentin 'Off-Label'

MONDAY, Nov. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Most prescriptions for the medication gabapentin are for unapproved uses -- and many patients end up taking it along with drugs that create potentially dangerous interactions.

That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at "off-label" use of gabapentin. In the United States, the drug is officially approved for treating cert...

Many Kids Separated From Families at U.S. Border Suffer PTSD

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Parents and children who were separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy have shown lasting psychological trauma -- even after being reunited, a new study finds.

Between 2017 and 2018, more than 5,000 children were separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border under the policy, whi...

Teen Social Media Posts About Cutting, Other Self-Harm Are Soaring

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

"It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an a...

Better Work Conditions Bringing Better Mental Health to Resident Doctors: Study

Medical training may be taking less of a mental health toll on young doctors than it used to, but depression remains common, a new study suggests.

Medical residency -- the training that new doctors undergo at hospitals or clinics -- is infamous for its grueling schedule, high pressure and relatively low pay. Research has shown that residents also have fairly high depression rates.

N...

As Countries Become More Tolerant, Suicides Among Gay Men Decline

A new study confirms that when a country is more accepting of people who are LGBTQ, fewer gay or bisexual men take their own lives.

In a new study, researchers compared life in a country where LGBTQ folks encounter strong stigma with that in a country where stigma against them is low. The upshot: The risk of depression and suicide dropped significantly when gay men moved to a more toleran...

Alzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social Life

Alzheimer's is a devastating disease, slowly robbing patients of their memories and even their sense of selves.

Now, new research shows it also robs sufferers of a healthy social life.

"Social relationships are an essential feature of our quality of life and can buffer against cognitive decline," said study co-author Addam Reynolds, a doctoral candidate at the Rutgers School of Soci...

Too Much Sitting May Be Bad for Your Mental Health

Call it the great pandemic sit-down.

As COVID-19 turned daily commutes into shuffles between rooms at home, and Netflix replaced time spent at the gym or playing sports, Americans have been sitting a lot more. Now a new study suggests it may be putting their mental health at risk.

"We knew COVID was going to affect our behavior and what we could do in lots of weird, funky ways that...

Placebo Effect Plays Big Role in Antidepressant's Impact on Anxiety: Study

Illustrating the power of the mind to heal itself, new research suggests that the placebo effect could help drive antidepressants' effects against anxiety disorders.

The placebo effect refers to an increase in the success of a treatment when a patient expects a benefit.

In the new study, patients with s...

Mindfulness Can Boost Your Mindset After Cardiac Arrest

Shining a light on the powerful link between the mind and body, a new study suggests that cardiac arrest survivors who learn to focus their thoughts on the here and now during recovery are less likely to become depressed or anxious.

The finding centers on a mental health practice known as "mindfulness," which amounts to a sort of stop-and-smell-the-roses approach to life.

"Min...

Screening School Kids for Depression Boosts Diagnoses, Outcomes

Schools could provide solutions for kids who are grappling with depression, a new study suggests.

Students who have school-based depression screening are twice as likely to begin treatment as peers who don't get that service, researchers say.

"Our study is publishing at a time when more adolescents are reporting symptoms of depression," said principal investigator Dr. Deepa Sekhar, ...

Discrimination Takes Toll on Mental Health of Young Adults

Young adults who face discrimination about their bodies, race, age or sex are at increased risk for mental health issues, researchers report.

They analyzed data gathered from more than 1,800 U.S. participants who provided details about their mental health, behavior and experiences of discrimination between ages 18 and 28, CNN reported.

Those who encountered discrimination a...

No 'Fall Back'? Sleep Experts Argue Against Daylight Standard Time

Most folks groan when the time comes to either "spring forward" or "fall back" an hour, with the waxing and waning of daylight saving time.

But that one-hour time shift — which occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday — is more than just a minor annoyance, sleep experts say.

Research has shown that deliberately messing with our internal clock twice a year increases our risk of accident, illness ...

After Clocks 'Fall Back' This Weekend, Watch Out for Seasonal Mood Changes

As clocks are turned back an hour this weekend and it gets dark earlier, many people will begin grappling with seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

The disorder -- also known as winter or seasonal depression -- affects up to 5% of Americans, but rates are much higher in Northern U.S. states (10%) than in Southern states (1%).

"It helps to remember that these shortened, colder days are...

Despite Stress of Pandemic, U.S. Suicide Rate Dropped in 2020

Despite the anxieties and tumult of the COVID-19 pandemic, overall suicide rates in the United States fell by about 3% between 2019 and 2020.

But during the same time frame, suicides increased among people aged 10 to 34. They also rose among Black, American Indian or Alaska Native, and Hispanic males, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Pandemic Has Stressed Out Doctors

It's a finding that stands to reason: A new study shows the pandemic has triggered anxiety and depression in many doctors.

Researchers used surveys to assess the mental health of more than 5,000 doctors in Spain, Italy and the United Kingdom at two points during the pandemic — June 2020 and November/December 2020.

Doctors in Italy had the highest rates of anxiety (1 in 4) and of d...

Purrfect Pal: Robotic Cats May Help People With Dementia

If you have a pet, you know that the excited wag of your dog's tail or the satisfied purr of your cat curling up on your lap can be a mood booster.

But what if that pet is a robot? And what if its owner has dementia?

In a small study, researchers at Florida Atlantic University found that engaging with a robotic pet might help people with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia, re...

Magnetic Brain Stimulation Helped Rid Him of Decades-Long Depression

When Tommy Van Brocklin signed up for a trial of a special type of magnetic brain stimulation therapy that could potentially ease his depression, he had already been living with the mood disorder for 45 years.

Van Brocklin, 60, first underwent an MRI that located the part of his brain that regulates executive functions such as problem-solving and inhibits unwanted responses.

Then f...

High School Football Won't Raise Lifetime Risk for Suicide: Study

Some parents may worry about whether playing high school football might put their kids at risk for depression and suicidal thoughts in adulthood, but new research suggests they can relax.

It included more than 2,300 U.S. males who enrolled in the study at average age of 15 and were assessed again at an average age of 29. At the start of the study, about 28% of the participants said they p...

Could Breastfeeding Help Women Keep Their Smarts as They Age?

Might breastfeeding affect a new mother's future brain health?

That's the intriguing question posed by a new study that flips the narrative from the often-touted benefits for baby to what impact breastfeeding might hold for Mom years later.

Researchers from UCLA Health found that women over age 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on tests of brain function than those ...

How Folks Are Coping With Post-COVID Loss of Smell, Taste

People who've lost their ability to smell and taste due to COVID-19 have significant struggles, but they can find ways to cope with their situation, a new study shows.

One of the most common side effects of COVID-19 is the loss of the sense of smell, which severely affects the sense of taste. This can lead to anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life.

In this study, five women...

People With Autism at Higher Risk for Suicide, Self-Harm: Study

A significantly increased risk of self-harm and suicide among people with autism shows the need for programs to reduce that risk, researchers say.

For their study, the investigators analyzed 31 studies on the link between autism and self-harm/suicide that were posted to five databases between 1999 and 2021. Overall, children and adults with autism had a threefold increased risk of self-ha...

Nurses Have Suicidal Thoughts More Often Than Other Workers: Study

U.S. nurses think about suicide more often than other workers do, but are less likely to tell anyone about it, new research reveals.

For the study, the researchers analyzed the responses of more than 7,000 nurses and nearly 5,200 other general workforce members who took part in a national poll on well-being that was conducted in November 2017 and included questions on issues ranging from ...

Depression, Anxiety Could Raise a Pregnant Woman's Odds for C-Section

While anxiety and depression in pregnant women have already been linked to low birth weight and preterm birth, they may also contribute to higher rates of cesarean deliveries.

Researchers called the study among the largest to document a link between mood and anxiety disorders and first-time C-sections among low-risk pregnant women.

"Our findings reinforce the importance of better id...

Little Change Seen in Americans' Use of Mental Health Services During Pandemic

With all of the fear, grief and isolation the pandemic has brought, it would stand to reason that there would be a big jump in the number of Americans seeking treatment for anxiety, depression and other mental health issues.

But that doesn't seem to be the case, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Instead, the percentage of adults who had re...

U.S. Psychologists See Big Spike in Demand for Mental Health Care

The number of Americans seeking treatment for anxiety and depression has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic, creating what a leading medical association terms a "mental health tsunami."

That's the key takeaway from a nationwide survey of psychologists by the American Psychological Association (APA).

"[The findings] highlight what we have been saying since the early days of the pan...

U.S. Pediatricians, Psychiatrists Declare 'Emergency' in Child Mental Health

Fear, grief, uncertainty and isolation during the pandemic have triggered a national state of emergency in the mental health of America's youth, leading child health care groups warned Tuesday.

Youngsters already faced significant mental health challenges, and the pandemic has made them worse, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Child and Adolesc...

Pandemic Grief Can Come Between Mothers and Their Newborns

Among the many negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic may be damage to the bond between mothers and their infants, researchers say.

Women who experienced grief and depression due to pandemic-related losses may find it more difficult to form this all-important emotional connection with their babies, according to a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in Boston.

"Becoming a...

Treating Depression Could Lengthen Lung Cancer Patients' Lives

Persistent depression can significantly shorten lung cancer survival -- even if patients receive the latest cancer treatments, new research shows.

"We need to help these patients, not only at diagnosis, but throughout treatment to take depressive symptoms out of the equation and let these impressive new therapies do their jobs," said lead author Barbara Anderson, a professor of psychology...

Depression in Early Life May Up Dementia Risk Later

Happy young adults may be somewhat protected from dementia, but the reverse may be true, too: If you're a depressed young adult, your odds for dementia rise, a new study suggests.

"Generally, we found that the greater the depressive symptoms, the lower the cognition and the faster the rates of decline," researcher Wi...

First Year of Pandemic Saw Depression Rates Triple

Depression rates rose three-fold among U.S. adults during the first year of the COVID pandemic, new research shows.

Surveys of more than 6,500 adults found that about 33% have had more intense symptoms of depression this year, compared to 28% in the pandemic's early months in spring of 2020 and 9% before it began.

"The sustained and increasing prevalence of elevated depressive sympt...

'Personalized' Brain Zaps May Ease Tough-to-Treat Depression

Imagine battling debilitating depression for years, trying everything but finding little or no relief.

That's what Sarah, 36, lived with most of her adult life.

"I had exhausted all possible treatment options," recalled Sarah, who did not want her last name used. "It [depression] had controlled my entire life. I barely moved. I barely did anything. I felt tortured every day."

...

Breastfeeding Longer May Lower Postpartum Depression Risk

Besides the long-established benefits of breastfeeding for baby and mom, a new study reports one more: Nursing could help chase the blues away.

It is linked to a lower risk for postpartum depression -- the so-called "baby blues" -- and nursing for a longer time may further ease depression symptoms, according to the findings.

"Women suffering from postpartum depression, which occurs ...

LGBQ Teens More Likely to Contemplate Suicide

Kids who are gay, bisexual or questioning their sexuality may be vulnerable to contemplating suicide at a tender age, a new U.S. government study finds.

It has long been known that teenagers who are part of sexual minorities have a higher risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, compared to their heterosexual peers. That includes kids who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or...

Stopping Antidepressants Raises Relapse Risk

People who stop taking antidepressants after long-time use may face a high likelihood of spiraling into depression again, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that among patients who stopped taking their antidepressants because they felt well, 56% relapsed within a year. That compared with 39% of patients who stayed on medication.

Experts said the results offer some hard ...

Depression During Pregnancy Raises Risk of Mood Disorder in Kids

When mothers suffer depression during or after pregnancy, their kids may be at heightened risk, too -- all the way into young adulthood, a new study suggests.

Of more than 5,000 kids researchers followed until age 24, those whose moms had depression during or after pregnancy tended to report more depression symptoms themselves.

That was true in their teens, but particularly in young...

For Boys, Sports Key to Mental Health

Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

"We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

Is Insulin Resistance a Recipe for Depression?

Insulin resistance can make you more than twice as likely to develop major depression, even if you haven't developed full-blown diabetes, a new study reports.

Initially healthy people who later developed prediabetes were 2.6 times more likely to come down with major depression during a nine-year follow-up period, according to the findings.

"The insulin-resistant folks had two to t...

Witnessing Abuse of a Sibling Can Traumatize a Child

Seeing a parent abuse a sibling can be as traumatizing as watching a parent hurt another parent, a new study finds.

And it can lead to depression, anxiety and anger, researchers say.

"When we hear about exposure to family violence, we usually think about someone being the victim of direct physical abuse or witnessing spousal assault," said researcher Corinna Tucker. She is a profes...

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after a neighborhood shooting, especially among kids who lived closest to it and those exposed to multiple shootings.

"...

Depression During Menopause: How to Spot It and Treat It

Emotional changes in the run-up to menopause can sometimes lead to depression.

It can be important to see a doctor to help determine whether you're just feeling stressed or "blue" -- or whether you might have clinical or major depression, a condition associated with a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Changing hormones during perimenopause -- the time when a woman's body is preparing...

Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for Dementia

Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

The new st...

Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • Getting Your First COVID Shot Can Boost Mental Health: Study

    When you got your first COVID-19 jab, did you breathe a sigh of relief? If so, you're not alone.

    U.S. adults who got the vaccine between December 2020 and March 2021 experienced a 4% reduction in their risk of being mildly depressed and a 15% drop in their risk of severe depression, researchers reported Sept. 8 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    "People who got vaccinated experienced a reduct...

    Eczema Can Take Toll on Child's Mental Health

    Eczema doesn't just irritate kids' skin. The often disfiguring condition may also be tied to depression, anxiety and sleep difficulties, new research warns.

    A study of more than 11,000 British children and teens found that those with severe eczema were twice as likely to become clinically depressed as eczema-free kids.

    "Eczema is an itchy red skin disease," said study author D...

    Depression Can Be a Killer for People With MS

    Depression and multiple sclerosis (MS) tend to travel together, new research finds, and when they do the chances of dying during the next decade can be up to five times greater than it is for those with neither condition.

    Exactly why the combination is so lethal is not fully understood, but several factors may be at play, explained study author Dr. Raffaele Palladino, a research associate...

    Cluster of Symptoms Common in People First Diagnosed With MS

    A number of symptoms are common among people who are newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a patient survey shows.

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable disease in which the nerves' protective layers are damaged, resulting in progressive disability.

    Feel Guilty About 'Useless' Leisure Time? Your Mental Health Might Suffer

    Struggling to decide whether to spend another hour at the office or take a late afternoon stroll?

    Put on your walking shoes.

    Making leisure time a priority is good for your mental health. For many, though, especially folks who prize productivity above all, it's a hard sell, a new study finds.

    "There is plenty of research which suggests that leisure has mental health benefits ...

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