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Health News Results - 286

Dangers of 'Superbug' Germs Greater Than Believed

MONDAY, Dec. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of new superbugs that pose a threat to human health and food crops is much higher than previously thought, new genetic research shows.

There's been an uptick in the number of laboratory studies showing how just one mutation could create highly infectious or "hypervirulent" strains of disease-causing bacteria, fungi and water molds.

...

Is Childbirth More Dangerous in Rural Areas?

MONDAY, Dec. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are pregnant and live in a rural area of the United States, new research shows that you're at higher risk of life-threatening complications or death during or after childbirth.

"Our study suggests that geographic disparities may put rural women at an increased risk of requiring lifesaving interventions during or immediately after deliver...

Houseflies: Just How Bad Are They for Your Health?

FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone quickly shoos houseflies off their dinner plates, but exactly how disease-ridden are these pesky insects?

New research reveals that flies do pick up plenty of microbes from the nearby environment -- germs that can then be transmitted to your food or drink.

But there's also reason to relax: Experts agreed that houseflies don't...

Antarctic Study Shows Isolation, Monotony May Change the Human Brain

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Antarctica is one of the loneliest places on Earth.

Endless expanses of white give way to almost complete darkness during the long winter months. Companionship is largely limited to those who've joined you in these achingly cold wilds.

That overwhelming isolation is so great that it appears to cause physical and functional deterior...

Another Possible Effect of Climate Change: More Preemie Babies

MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rising temperatures might help trigger premature birth, a new study finds, suggesting that global warming could deliver more "preemie" babies.

Looking at 20 years of data on heat waves and birth timing across the United States, researchers "estimate that an average of 25,000 infants per year were born earlier as a result of heat exposure."

...

Even in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older Americans

THURSDAY, Nov. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even a little exposure to the fine particles of air pollution can translate into higher hospitalization rates for a number of common conditions among older Americans, a new study suggests.

"The study shows that the health dangers and economic impacts of air pollution are significantly larger than previously understood," said study author Ya...

Bacteria Could Be Weapon Against Mosquito-Borne Dengue

FRIDAY, Nov. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lab-altered mosquitoes have made a big dent in the spread of dengue fever, researchers report.

How? Australian scientists released mosquitoes carrying a bacteria that prevents transmission of the dengue virus.

The strategy resulted in a 76% decrease in dengue transmission in a community in Indonesia that has frequent dengue outbr...

U.S. Hurricanes Are Bigger, Stronger, More Destructive: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change has increased the size, strength and destructive force of hurricanes that strike the United States, according to a new Danish study.

It also reported that the most severe hurricanes are more than three times as common as they were 100 years ago.

The conclusions are based on a new way of analyzing historical hurricane d...

Nature Nurtures Kids

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking that trek through the woods with your child may do more than build strong muscles.

New research suggests that time spent in nature is also good for their mental and emotional well-being.

"This research shows that children experience profound and diverse benefits through regular contact with nature. Contact with the wild impr...

'Meatless Monday' Can Help Change Diets for Good

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people who tried going meatless one day a week to call attention to food and climate change continued after the campaign ended, a new study says.

Researchers surveyed 320 households from Bedford, N.Y., that took part in the town's "Meatless Monday" campaign in 2018. For 12 weeks, participants ate no meat one day a week.

In a s...

Climate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report Warns

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children will face more food shortages and infections if climate change continues unchecked, researchers from the World Health Organization and 34 other institutions warn.

Climate change is already harming children's health. And they're at risk for lifelong health threats unless the world meets Paris Agreement targets to limit warming to wel...

Plants Will Not Boost Your Home's Air Quality: Study

TUESDAY, Nov. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Don't count on potted plants to keep your home's air clean.

Dispelling a common belief, researchers at Drexel University in Philadelphia found that natural ventilation does a far better job than houseplants in maintaining air quality in homes and offices.

"This has been a common misconception for some time. Plants are great, but the...

Rural Americans Dying More From Preventable Causes Than City Dwellers

THURSDAY, Nov. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows.

These causes include cancer, heart disease, injury, respiratory disease and stroke, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research.

Between 2010 and 2017, rural counties saw a wide...

Heart Cells Change During Spaceflight

THURSDAY, Nov. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It sounds scary, but the changes are only temporary: Researchers report that heart cells grown in space showed altered gene expression.

But just 10 days after being returned to Earth, the heart cells returned to normal.

Once stem cells grew into heart cells aboard the International Space Station, their exposure to microgravity chang...

Climate Change a 'Threat to Human Well-Being,' Scientists Say

TUESDAY, Nov. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A global coalition of more than 11,000 scientists warns that planet Earth is facing a "climate emergency" that will cause "untold human suffering" unless drastic steps are taken.

The warming climate is already taking a toll on human health, causing widespread hunger and illness that will grow exponentially worse, said the warning's lead author...

Daylight Saving Time Bad for Health, Experts Claim

MONDAY, Nov. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Clocks were set back one hour on Sunday, but some health experts say it might be better if time changes ended for good.

It's more than an inconvenience, it's a potential health threat, they warn.

Over time, daylight saving time (DST) eliminates bright morning light that's crucial to synchronizing your biologic clock, possibly putting ...

'Green Inhalers' Could Reduce Carbon Footprint: Study

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eco-friendly asthma inhalers could lower both greenhouse emissions and medical costs, according to a new British study.

Inhalers use hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants to atomize and pump out the medication, but HFAs are potent greenhouse gases. And metered-dose inhalers are responsible for 3.9% of the carbon footprint of the National ...

Wildfire Smoke Threatens Health for Miles Around

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoke from the wildfires raging in California poses a serious health risk -- even to those far away from the blazes, an expert warns.

"Smoke can present special health hazards to humans and pets, especially children, older adults and those with chronic respiratory problems such as emphysema, asthma, congestive heart failure, chronic obstruc...

Ban on Sale of Sugary Drinks Trimmed Employees' Waistlines

TUESDAY, Oct. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size...

Giving Up One Food Will Help Your Health -- and the Planet

MONDAY, Oct. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eating right is not only good for you, it's good for Mother Earth as well, a new study shows.

Vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, olive oil and fish all reduce your risk of death and disease when consumed as part of a regular diet, findings show.

They're also mostly associated with low environmental impacts.

On the othe...

Windy, Humid Days Could Bring More Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your great granddaddy may have been right about the weather worsening his arthritis.

People with chronic pain conditions are more likely to suffer pain on humid and windy days, according to a study that used smartphones to assess pain-weather connections.

"The results of this study could be important for patients in the future for ...

Bald Eagles Across U.S. Infected With Newly Identified Virus

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bald eagles in the United States are facing another challenge: Nearly one-third are infected with a newly identified virus, researchers say.

The virus is called bald eagle hepacivirus (BeHV). The researchers discovered it while trying to determine the cause of Wisconsin River Eagle Syndrome (WRES), a fatal disease seen in bald eagles in the L...

By Mid-Century, Heat Waves Could Cover Far Bigger Areas

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could trigger much bigger heat waves by mid-century, U.S. researchers report.

Previous research has predicted that the number and intensity of heat waves will increase, but this study is the first to examine changes in their potential physical size.

"As the physical size of these affected regions increases, more peop...

Seaside Living Soothes the Mind of Rich and Poor Alike

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could living near the coast be an inexpensive balm for mental troubles?

"Our research suggests, for the first time, that people in poorer households living close to the coast experience fewer symptoms of mental health disorders," said researcher Dr. Jo Garrett, from the University of Exeter, in England.

"When it comes to mental heal...

Did Brexit Vote Drive Man to Psychotic Episode?

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Brexit has thrown the United Kingdom into political and economic uncertainty, but it might have actually triggered a psychotic break in one man, a new report suggests.

The 2016 Brexit referendum started the process of the U.K. leaving the European Union.

Three weeks after the referendum, a middle-aged man was taken by paramedics to...

Does Parents' Smoking Raise Future Heart Risks for Kids?

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When parents smoke, their kids may face a higher risk of a common heart rhythm problem decades later, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that adults who grew up with smokers were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation, versus those with nonsmoking parents.

Atrial fibrillation (or "a-fib") is a heart arrhythmia in which the ...

Even Dolphins Are Threatened by Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbugs'

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have found one more way Flipper is a lot like people: The sharp rise in antibiotic resistance affecting humans is also happening to dolphins.

The discovery stems from a 13-year study of bottlenose dolphins in Florida's Indian River Lagoon.

"We've been able to provide a large database of information in order to continue l...

Stricter Arsenic Standard Made Public Drinking Water Safer: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water syste...

Is Your State One of the 'Most Obese' in America?

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. states with adult obesity rates above 35% reached an all-time high of nine in 2018, a new report says.

In 2018, the nine states with adult obesity rates above 35% were: Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and West Virginia.

That's two more than the year befor...

'First Responders' on 9/11 Face Lingering Heart Woes, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The firefighters who flooded into Ground Zero on 9/11 put their lives on the line to help others. Now, a new study shows they are still paying the price for their selflessness.

Those who were first on the scene or worked for months among the ruins of the World Trade Center disaster in 2001 have an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and he...

For Muslim Pilgrimage, Climate Change Poses Health Risks

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change-caused increases in heat and humidity could put Muslims making the pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia in "extreme danger," a new study warns.

This pilgrimage, known as the Hajj, involves several days of activities, including 20 to 30 hours outdoors.

The timing of the Hajj varies. This year, it was Aug. 9 to 14, an...

Lots of Teens Are Breathing in Others' Vaping Fumes

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The danger to teenagers' lungs from e-cigarettes isn't only occurring in those who vape: A new report finds many young bystanders are breathing in "secondhand" fumes.

The researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Youth Tobacco Survey, and found that about one-third of middle and high school students were exposed to vaping aerosols in...

Caw-lesterol? Fatty City Food Hits Crows' Arteries

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your lunch leftovers are doing no favors for urban birds' hearts, new research shows.

Fatty food scraps may be boosting the cholesterol levels of crows in U.S. cities, but whether it's a threat to their health isn't clear.

A team from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., analyzed blood cholesterol levels of 140 crow nestlings in urban ...

Climate Change Hiking Danger of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Infections

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a horrible fate: You take a cool dip in the ocean and become infected with flesh-eating bacteria.

Climate change is making this terrifying scenario more common in the northern part of the United States, one infectious disease expert says.

These infections are caused by Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. There are about 80,000 s...

Wintertime Smog Tied to Rise in Heart Procedures

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breathing in smoggy air, especially in the colder months, may be especially taxing for the heart, new research out of Europe suggests.

Polish researchers found that high levels of air pollution were tied to spikes in procedures to open blocked heart arteries. This was especially apparent in winter, when pollution levels were highest, a new stu...

Smoggy Air Might Contribute to Macular Degeneration

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tailpipe pollution might pose a real health threat to aging eyes, according to a new study out of Taiwan.

Researchers there found that exposure to high levels of two car exhaust pollutants nearly doubled the odds of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

It's one of the most common causes of vision loss in older people.

Texas Cities Are Ripe for Measles Outbreaks, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Texas cities are in danger of major measles outbreaks because an alarming number of school kids are unvaccinated, researchers warn.

Vaccination rates in the state have declined since 2003 and a computer simulation by University of Pittsburgh researchers found that an additional 5% decrease could increase the size of a measles outbreak b...

Could Dirty Air Spur a Rise in Serious Mental Illness?

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As air quality declines, the prevalence of mental health conditions may rise, a large, new study suggests.

Looking at data on millions of people in the United States and Denmark, researchers found correlations between air pollution exposure and rates of certain psychiatric disorders. In both countries, poorer air quality was linked to a sligh...

City Parks Are a Mood Booster

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living in the city can be hard on the senses and the spirit, but spending some time in a tree-lined park could counteract that stress, new research suggests.

"Over a three-month period, we collected tweets from 4,688 Twitter users before, during and after they posted from the park," explained study author Aaron Schwartz. He's a Ph.D. candidat...

Fast-Food Joints in the Neighborhood? Heart Attack Rates Likely to Go Up

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you live in a neighborhood where fast-food restaurants abound, you might be more likely to have a heart attack, new research suggests.

It turns out that heart attack rates are higher in neighborhoods with more fast-food joints, the Australian study found.

For every additional fast-food outlet in a neighborhood, there were four a...

Americans' Trust in Scientists Follows a Sharp Political Divide

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Americans' confidence in scientists is on the rise, but deep political divisions persist, a new nationwide poll reveals.

The Pew Research Center poll of more than 4,400 adults found that 86% have at least "a fair amount" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest. That includes 35% who said they have "a great deal" of co...

Heat Waves Brought by Climate Change Could Prove Deadly for Kidney Patients

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research uncovers yet another population that will be vulnerable to the heat waves that climate change is delivering with increasing frequency: people with kidney disease.

Extremely hot days can increase advanced kidney disease patients' risk of hospitalization and death, and climate change means they'll face more such days, the study aut...

Giving Up Meat Could Help Your Health -- And the Planet's

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If Americans traded in their hamburgers for tofu, buckwheat and asparagus, it could make a big difference in the health of the planet -- without shortchanging anyone on nutrients.

That's the conclusion of a new study in which researchers estimated the benefits -- to humans and the environment -- of diets centered on "nutritionally sound" meat...

Climate Change Could Raise Mercury Levels in Some Fish

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study adds to the list of potential health threats from global warming: Higher mercury levels in certain fish.

While eating fish is considered part of a healthy diet, it's also a source of mercury -- which, in high enough amounts, is toxic to the nervous system and kidneys.

Small fish generally have only small amounts of merc...

In Heat Waves, Fans May Do More Harm Than Good

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking of picking up an electric fan to help keep you cool and protect your health during the next heat wave?

You might want to think again.

Electric fans might make you feel cooler, but they can actually increase your risk of becoming heat sick and even dying from a heat stroke, the evidence shows.

Electric fans could co...

Scorching Pavement Sends Some to the ER With Burns

FRIDAY, Aug. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Make sure rubber, not your skin, meets the road: When skin touches sunbaked pavement, serious burns can quickly set in.

In sizzling regions like the Southwestern United States, all it takes for a severe burn is 2 seconds of unprotected skin-on-asphalt contact, experts say.

"Our research shows that in our city, the risk starts when the...

Trees an Oasis of Mental Well-Being

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- City dwellers who live on tree-lined streets might be happier and healthier for it, a large new study suggests.

The study, of nearly 47,000 urban residents, found that those who lived in areas shaded by tree canopy reported less psychological distress and better general health over six years.

Green grass, on the other hand, didn't c...

Warm Bath Can Send You Off to a Sound Slumber, Study Finds

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's a win-win for all those bath lovers who struggle with poor sleep: New research suggests a soak in the tub before bedtime may shorten the time it takes to fall asleep.

A well-timed warm bath, or even a warm shower, also appears to prolong how long someone stays asleep, investigators found. And indications are that overall sleep quality...

Dirty Air Kills 30,000 Americans Each Year

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite improved air quality since the 1990s, pollution still causes lung disease, heart attacks and strokes that kill more than 30,000 Americans each year, a new study estimates.

Researchers looked at concentrations of fine pollution particles known as PM2.5 across the country from 1999 to 2015. These tiny particles -- 30 times smaller than...

Astronauts: Exercise More in Space, Faint Less on Earth

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Americans mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and man's first steps on the surface of the moon, a new study offers a solution for a vexing problem that many astronauts experience on their return to Earth.

All the time that astronauts spend floating weightless can trigger fainting and dizziness when they once again feel Earth'...

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