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16 Jun

Teens Who Feel Their Parents Are Overbearing May Have Trouble With Relationships

Parenting style impacts psychological and social growth, new study finds.

12 Feb

Sharing The Love On Valentine's Day And Every Other Day

10 tips to show your kids unconditional love and support.

Health News Results - 347

Tips for Parents of Kids With Diabetes

Kids with diabetes can lead full, fun lives, but they have special needs. Here's what parents should know.

Diabetes is common among American children. More than 205,000 kids and teens have the disease, and cases are rising.

Age makes a difference in the type of diabetes a child is likely to have.

"Most children younger than age 10 with diabetes have type 1," said Dr. Santhosh ...

Toddler Tantrums? Pediatricians Offer Tips to Curb Bad Behavior

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Toddler behavior won't always be good. Outbursts are normal.

Yet, you can also use those aggravating moments to help shape your little one's behavior, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Start by teaching the "house rules," the AAP advises. Put away valuables you don't want your toddler to touch. Consider setting up an...

Many Parents Support 'Teens Helping Teens' Mental Health Programs at Schools: Poll

It may take a village to support teens' mental health, whether it's during the pandemic or later.

One option is having school-based mental health programs that offer peer support leaders.

A new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at Michigan Medicine found that one in three parents are strongly in favor of a peer support program. The poll also asked que...

How Divorce Harms Kids, and How to Lessen That Harm


Kids who see their parents bicker during a separation or divorce are more likely to develop a fear of abandonment, new research warns.

And even if a youngster feels close to one or both parents, that fear can still undermine his or her mental health down the road.

The findings stem from interviews with roughly 560 kids between 9 and 18 years of age. Pa...

During Lockdowns, Women Took on Most of Burden of Child Care

Despite being locked down during the pandemic, child care responsibilities often fell on women's shoulders, a new study shows.

"Most people have never undergone anything like this before, where all of a sudden they can't rely on their normal child care, and most people's work situation has changed, too," said researcher Kristen Shockley, an associate professor of psychology at the Univers...

New Year, New Tips for Keeping Your Kids Safe and Healthy

A new year can be a fresh start for you and your kids -- and perhaps no year has needed a fresh start more than this one. So, a leading doctors' group is offering parents tips for a healthy "reset" in 2021.

Get immunized. First of all, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is recommending you make sure your family is up to date on vaccines. If your family hasn't ye...

Coping With Anxiety, Fear During a Rocky Presidential Transition

The nation is in a state of shock and outrage over Wednesday's riotous siege on the U.S. Capitol Building by supporters of President Donald Trump, and there could be still worse to come before the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

So, taking care of your mental and physical health will be important in the coming days of trial and tribulation in the United States, American...

Pediatricians' Group Says School Is Priority, With Proper Safety Measures

A prominent U.S. doctors' group reaffirmed its recommendation this week that having kids physically in school should be the goal, while also outlining safety protocols needed to allow schools to be open.

In its COVID-19 guidance for safe schools, the American Academy of Pediatrics listed measures communities need to address. These include controlling the spread of COVID-19 in the communit...

Kids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of Mental Health Issues

Kids born with heart defects may be more likely to develop anxiety, depression and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), regardless of the severity of their heart condition.

Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting about 40,000 babies a year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The defects...

Laughter As Medicine: Clowns Help Hospitalized Kids Cope

Send in the clowns. They could help hospitalized children cope with pain and anxiety.

New research shows that hospital clowns can help improve both physical symptoms and the psychological well-being of children and teens through laughter and play.

For the study, researchers from Brazil and Canada reviewed databases to find clinical trials on the subject of hospital clowns publish...

Parents Feel the Strain as Pandemic Adds New Role: Teacher

New York City mom and author Lyss Stern spends most of her weekdays trying to help her three children learn remotely, and things are not going smoothly for any of them.

"There are a lot of moving parts, and I feel like I am constantly being an octopus," she said. "Are they learning enough? Are they challenged? Are missed assignments piling up? Are they looking at TikTok on their phone und...

Involved Dads Make a Difference for Disadvantaged Teens

Dads matter: New research shows how attentive, involved fathers can really boost the mental well-being and behavior of teens from low-income families.

The study looked at 5,000 U.S. children born between 1998 and 2000, and their fathers' involvement with them between ages 5 and 15.

That included activities such as feeding, playing, reading, helping with homework and providing non-c...

Be Alert to Early Signs of Eating Disorders, Pediatricians' Group Says

A leading pediatricians' group says families often spot eating disorders too late -- and offers new guidelines to reach an earlier diagnosis.

"For too long, eating disorders were considered a disease that afflicted mostly affluent white teenage girls," said Dr. Laurie Hornberger, lead author of the report written by the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Adolescence.

"We k...

Poll Charts U.S. Parents' Biggest Worries During Pandemic

Life has changed for a lot of families during the pandemic, and that has brought with it many worries for parents.

A new national poll found that parents' top concerns for their children include overuse of social media and screen time, internet safety, depression, suicide, unhealthy eating and lack of physical activity. Overall, they ranked COVID-19 as number 10 on their list of worries....

Give Your Family the Gift of Regular Exercise

Physical activity could be the best gift to give your family this holiday season. And the American Heart Association (AHA) has some suggestions on how to do that.

Find open times for physical activity and make it a regular part of your family's schedule. Include it on a weekly calendar for the whole family.

Experts say children should be limited to one to two hours of TV/computer/v...

Sports Might Be Good Therapy for Boys With Behavioral Issues: Study

Participation in organized sports could help reduce behavior problems in very young boys, a new study of Irish kids suggests.

One-year-old boys with developmental delays were less likely to have developed emotional problems or poor conduct by age 5 if they regularly attended a sports club or group, researchers reported recently in The Journal of Pediatrics.

"Think about it ...

Pandemic Causing Dangerous Delays in Care When Appendicitis Strikes Kids

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, doctors became concerned that people were delaying needed medical care to avoid hospitals. Now a new study hints that some parents may have waited to get emergency treatment for their children's appendicitis.

Appendicitis is a painful inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch that extends from the colon, on the lower right side of the abdomen.

Parents, Don't Worry if Baby's Sleep Is Erratic

New parents can relax: Research suggests it's normal for infants' sleep patterns to vary widely.

"Although previous research has shown that infants start sleeping through the night at different stages of development, little is known about individual sleep patterns night after night," explained study leader Marie-Helene Pennestri. She's an assistant professor in the department of education...

How to Keep Kids Resilient in a Strange Holiday Season

Parents who are worried about the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on their children's mental health can help them build resilience, according to experts from Nationwide Children's Hospital.

A hospital survey found that two-thirds of parents worry that the effects on their children's mental health will be more challenging the longer the COVID-19 pandemic goes on.

But the experts said th...

COVID in Kids: The Most Telling Symptoms

Among thousands of kids tested for COVID-19, an upset stomach, loss of taste/smell, fever and headache were symptoms most predictive of positive test results, a Canadian study found.

But one-third of children and teens with the coronavirus showed no symptoms, the researchers noted.

"Because more than one-third of pediatric patients who test positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection exhibit...

More Kids Injured by Tiny Magnets After Sales Ban Was Lifted: Study

Small, powerful magnets in toys like Buckyballs building sets and jewelry kits are causing an alarming number of serious pediatric injuries in the United States, new research warns.

Analyzing national data, researchers found an 80% rise in these injuries to children from 2016 to 2019, following the repeal of a sales ban on the magnets by a federal court.

When these small rare e...

Does Parents' Nagging Kids About Screen Time Even Matter?

Parents' constant refrain, telling their teens to turn off the TV, stop playing video games or put down the cellphone, may not be necessary.

And new research suggests those worried about their kids becoming addicted to technology may even be able to breathe a sigh of relief.

The amount of time young people spend on technology -- and parental limits on that time -- had no lasting eff...

Parents' Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against COVID, Study Finds

As scientists worked on COVID-19 vaccines, other researchers were addressing a question: Once shots are available, will parents vaccinate their kids against the new coronavirus?

The answer: Younger parents are much less likely than older ones to plan to vaccinate their children and themselves against COVID-19.

"Parents' willingness to vaccinate themselves and their children against ...

Antibiotics Before Age 2 May Up Odds for Obesity, Allergies

Kids given antibiotics before their second birthday may have a heightened risk for chronic conditions like allergies and obesity, a new study suggests.

The drugs' effect on the "microbiome" -- trillions of helpful microbes living in the human body -- might play a role in a baby's future health, Mayo Clinic researchers said.

The study analyzed data from more than 14,500 childre...

Kids With Food Allergies Can Become Targets for Bullies

As if having food allergies isn't hard enough on a child, new research shows that almost 1 in 5 of these kids are bullied.

The bullying didn't stop at the schoolyard. A similar percentage of parents said they had been teased about their concern for their child's food allergies.

"I think this is an underreported problem because a lot of kids don't report being bullied. I think bullyi...

Telemedicine Is Keeping Kids' Asthma Care on Track: Study

The use of telemedicine led to an increase in the number of inner-city kids in Los Angeles who kept asthma-related doctor appointments during the coronavirus pandemic, new research shows.

The researchers examined "show rates" -- how often parents kept an appointment for their children instead of not showing up -- over the first four months of the pandemic.

Allergists who run a schoo...

Almost 1 in 5 Parents Are 'Vaccine Hesitant,' Study Finds

Nearly one in five American parents described themselves as "hesitant about childhood shots" in 2019, a new U.S. government study finds.

That was fewer than the one in four who expressed hesitancy about vaccines in 2018.

The new research found real consequences from vaccine hesitancy. Rates of flu vaccination were 26 percentage points lower in children of "vaccine-hesitant" parents ...

Help Young Athletes Keep Their Competitive Edge During Pandemic

There are a number of ways that young athletes can maintain their conditioning while away from their sports during the coronavirus pandemic, an expert says.

"Although competitive practice or play isn't an option for most right now, athletes should create and stick to a routine, just as if they were with the team. A conditioning routine should incorporate cardiovascular movements, weight a...

Are Healthy Kids Getting Too Many Heart Tests?

Not every kid needs an electrocardiogram (ECG) before playing sports or as part of routine exams, child health experts say.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is advising parents and pediatricians to avoid unnecessary tests, and has released a list of common medical practices and therapies that may not be needed for young patients.

The AAP and the Choosing Wisely campaign al...

Lockdowns Got Your Teen Down? Here's How to Help

If you're the parent of a teen, you had plenty to deal with before the pandemic began -- dramatic sighs, slamming doors, eye-rolling -- and that was only when your teen wasn't out somewhere with friends.

But the coronavirus pandemic brought your teen's social life to a screeching halt. No more in-person school, no more sports, no more clubs and definitely no hanging out with friends or a ...

AHA News: Can Video Games Help You Level Up Your Health?

You might assume that portraying video games as bad for your health would be as easy as shooting ducks on an old Nintendo.

Even a professional gamer like Noah "Nifty" Francis, 22, admits players aren't known for having great habits. Francis, who plays Counter-Strike: Global Offensive for the Dallas-based Team Envy, knows people who play 14 hours at a time, so focused on the game that they...

Lockdowns Can Widen Kids' Waistlines – Here's How to Curb That

Stuck at home, bored. Fiddling with their phone or playing video games. Munching on snack foods to while away the time.

School-age children gaining excess pounds could be one lasting health problem caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, with pediatricians and public health experts warning about a potentially dramatic increase in childhood obesity.

"I think it is possible, and pote...

Microplastics Are Seeping Out of Baby's Bottle, Study Shows

New parents preparing a bottle for their baby should know the infant may ingest unwanted microplastics along with the nourishing formula, a new study warns.

High levels of microplastic particles are released from baby bottles during formula preparation, researchers discovered during lab testing.

Infants are likely exposed to an average daily dose of nearly 1.6 million microp...

An Expert's Guide to Safe Sleeping for Your Baby

To keep your baby safe while sleeping, experts recommend practicing the "ABCs" of sleep.

Babies should sleep alone, on their back and in a crib. That's the best way to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

SIDS is the unexplained death of a child under 1 year of age that usually occurs during sleep. The United States has about 3,500 sleep-relate...

Could Virtual Training Help Parents of Kids With Autism Manage Behavior?

Virtual training is effective in teaching parents of children with autism about early behavioral intervention, according to a new study.

The alternative to in-person training is the only option for many parents during the coronavirus pandemic or for those who can't attend in-person sessions for other reasons.

"Since parents play an important role in the treatment of their ch...

It's Tough to Change the Minds of 'Vaccine-Hesitant' Parents, Study Finds

When parents have concerns about the safety of childhood vaccinations, it can be tough to change their minds, as a new study shows.

The study involved "vaccine-hesitant" parents -- a group distinct from the staunch "anti-vaxxer" crowd. They have worries about one or more routine vaccines, and question whether the benefits for their child are worthwhile.

Even though those par...

Kids' Hospitalizations Accompany Rising Unemployment Rates: Study

COVID-19 has led to widespread job loss in the United States. And now a new study reports that when unemployment rates rise, so do hospitalizations of children.

For the study, researchers analyzed 12 years of data (2002 to 2014) from 14 states. They found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there was a 2% increase in child hospitalizations for all causes, among them d...

Pandemic Silver Lining: Steep Drop in Kids' Fractures

In a rare bit of good news tied to the coronavirus pandemic, researchers say pediatric fractures plummeted by nearly 60% this past spring.

Investigators say the finding likely reflects the sudden evaporation of organized sports and curtailed playground use due to the threat of COVID-19.

"We compared fracture incidence in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic -- March...

Parents Often in the Dark When Kids Take Up Vaping

Parents are often clueless when their kids start smoking e-cigarettes, a new study finds.

On the other hand, Mom and Dad usually can tell if their children take up traditional smoking, said researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

Having strict household rules against any form of tobacco is the best form of prevention, researchers found. And those rules ...

Kids Much Less Prone to Coronavirus Infection Than Adults: Study

Combined data from 32 studies from around the world suggest that children under the age of 10 are much less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared with adults, given the same daily contacts.

Children's risk appears to rise with age: Among adolescent and older teenagers, the risk of infection begins to approach that of adults, according to British researchers led by Russel...

After COVID-19 Exposure, When Can Young Athletes Resume Play?

Young athletes who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms should be symptom-free for 14 days and get their doctor's OK before returning to practices or games, according to a leading group of U.S. pediatricians.

An electrocardiogram (EKG) is also recommended for those who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in updated guidance.

"Exercis...

Are At-Home 'Learning Pods' the Right Fit for Your Family?

Emily Davis and her husband started a "learning pod" with another family this summer, hiring a teacher for child care and now for the start of first grade. Their 6-year-old son is an only child, which was a big factor in the decision. The other family has two kids.

"It might be a full school year [of distance learning]. Then it's really just not OK for an only child to see no other ch...

Kids at 2 Utah Day Cares Easily Spread COVID to Families

It's not clear how COVID-19 outbreaks at three Salt Lake City child day care centers began, but a new report finds that 12 infected youngsters enrolled at two of the facilities easily passed SARS-CoV-2 to at least 12 family members.

In one case, an infected child with no symptoms of COVID-19 transmitted the illness to their mother, who became so sick she needed to be hospitalized.

...

Over Half a Million U.S. Kids Already Infected With COVID-19

More than 500,000 U.S. children had been diagnosed with COVID-19 as of early September, with a sizable uptick seen in recent weeks, a new report reveals.

There were 70,630 new child cases reported between Aug. 20 and Sept. 3, 2020. That brings the total to 513,415 cases -- a 16% increase over two weeks, according to state-by-state data compiled by the American Academy of Pediatric...

COVID-19 Precautions Extend to Car Seats, Seat Belts

Face masks and hand-washing are a good start, but to protect your kids from the coronavirus you'll need to up your game on the road, too, a leading pediatricians' group says.

There are a number of things parents should do to protect children from COVID-19 infection when they're traveling in cars or using other types of transportation, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (A...

Cyberbullying Could Rise During Lockdown, But Parents Can Stop It

Cyberbullying is less common among teens who feel loved and supported by their parents, new research shows.

The findings could be especially relevant during the coronavirus pandemic, say a team from New York University.

"With remote learning replacing classroom instruction for many young people, and cellphones and social media standing in for face-to-face interaction with fr...

Time Spent in Nature Boosts Kids' Well-Being

Whether camping, hiking or gardening, connecting with nature has many benefits for children's well-being, a new study suggests.

"There is strong evidence that children are happier, healthier, function better, know more about the environment, and are more likely to take action to protect the natural world when they spend time in nature," said researcher Dr. Louise Chawla, professor em...

AHA News: Helping Fathers Connect With Their Kids, InvolvedDad's Name Says It All

While vacationing at a waterpark with his wife, Leah, and their three young children, Shon Hart had what can only be described as an epiphany.

"My kids had their mother and father there with them to experience these moments," Hart said. "I realized how blessed they are to not know the plight of many other children who are growing up without their dads. It was a powerful, surreal moment....

Don't Count on Vitamin D to Ease Childhood Asthma

Vitamin D supplements don't prevent severe asthma attacks in at-risk children, according to a study that challenges previous research.

"The reason that's important is there are colleagues around this country and worldwide who are testing vitamin D levels for kids with asthma and giving them vitamin D," said study lead author Dr. Juan Celedón. He's chief of pediatric pulmonary m...

Fluoridated Water Protects Baby Teeth, Too

Fluoride in drinking water reduces the odds for severe cavities in baby teeth, researchers from New Zealand report.

Although fluoridated toothpaste is widely available, fluoridated water continues to show a benefit in reducing cavities, said Dr. Howard Pollick, a health sciences clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry.

"Communit...

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