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15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

Health News Results - 469

State Lotteries Didn't Help Boost Vaccination Rates

FRIDAY, Oct. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A shot at winning $1 million did nothing to budge the number of people who got the COVID-19 jab.

According to a new study, lotteries...

Nature Helped Many Kids Cope During Lockdown: Study

Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children ...

'Feel Good' Hormone Won't Help Ease Kids' Autism, Study Finds

THURSDAY, Oct. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Despite hints of promise from early research, a new clinical trial finds no evidence that kids with autism benefit from nasal sprays containing the "love" hormone oxytocin.

Researchers called the findings disappointing.

But they said the study also offers important information: Some parents of children with autism are al...

Testosterone Levels Matter for Men's, Women's Sex Lives

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- What launches guys on serial sexual conquests and prompts solo activity among women?

It's testosterone, of course.

As the primary male sex hormone, it plays a leading role in the sexual development of guys. But folks often overlook the role it plays in female sexuality. Yes, women have testosterone, too, though much le...

Men, Women Behaved Differently During Pandemic Lockdowns

How do men and women respond to a crisis?

A look at their behavior during the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 offers a clue: Women flocked to their phones for long conversations with a few trusted contacts.

Men, chafing at being cooped up, headed out and about as soon as they could, European researchers report.

"The total shutdown of public life was like a population-wide liv...

Stimulants Like Ritalin May Be Gateway Drugs for College Students

Use of stimulants among college students was once thought to be a problem among high achievers seeking energy and focus to study.

Not so, according to new research that links misuse of these so-called "study drugs" to binge drinking and marijuana use. The stereotype of students bumming a prescription medication like Adderall or Ritalin to study is off the mark, it suggests.

"Stimula...

Many Americans May Quit, Change Jobs Due to Pandemic Stress: Survey

The pressures of the pandemic have dramatically altered the American workplace, and now a new survey shows that many folks who have struggled with low salaries, long hours and lack of opportunity plan to change jobs.

More than 40% of workers said they plan to make the switch in the coming year, the poll found. If that occurs, it could seriously affect many industries already facing shorta...

Medical Mistrust Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy Among Hispanics

Misinformation and medical mistrust are major drivers of vaccine hesitancy among U.S. Hispanics, new research shows.

The researchers also found that protecting other family members is an important factor in convincing Hispanics to get vaccinated.

The small study included 22 Hispanic mothers in Oregon and 24 of their children who were in grades 9 to 12. At the time of the study, Hisp...

Silver Lining Found in Pandemic: Fewer Teens Are Vaping

It turns out that the pandemic has reaped one unexpected benefit: As teens were kept home more often, their use of electronic cigarettes dropped by nearly 40%, a new report finds.

U.S. health officials said these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt, but the decrease in vaping in 2021 is probably real and makes sense because teens often vape socially, one expert told the Asso...

Diet Drinks May Thwart Efforts to Lose Weight

Trying to slim down? Diet drinks aren't likely to help, researchers warn.

And those containing the artificial sweetener sucralose may even increase food cravings and appetite in women and people who are obese, according to a University of Southern California study.

"There...

Babies Know Best When It Comes to Play

Spend time with babies and you'll see they pick up items, bang them together and, often, chew on them.

That play is key to learning and development, but most research on infant play has taken place in a lab and not on a living room floor — until now.

"At a time in development when infants must acquire information about what objects are and what they can do with them, massive amoun...

Retired and Want to Stay Sharp? Hop on the Internet More Often

Help in retaining mental function when you age could be only a few keystrokes away.

While crosswords and exercise are often touted as ways to retain thinking skills, U.K. investigators found that the internet may also help seniors stay sharp in retirement.

Those who used the internet more after their careers ended had substantially higher scores on cognitive, or thinking, tests, ac...

For Boys, Sports Key to Mental Health

Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

"We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

Obesity a Threat to Adults With Autism, But There May Be Help

Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

Yet, a small, new pilot study suggest...

Intervening in Infancy Might Help Prevent Some Cases of Autism: Study

Infants may show early signs of autism, but a diagnosis usually isn't made until age 3. Now, a new study suggests that jumpstarting therapy might stave off that diagnosis altogether.

Researchers say their preemptive, parent-led intervention could have a significant impact on children's social development and longer-term disabilities.

"What we found is that the babies who received ou...

Dealing With Grief in the Time of COVID

That feeling that many people are collectively experiencing right now? It's grief.

Some may be living through the loss of family, friends or colleagues who have died from the COVID-19 virus. Others have had losses that would be considered major life events, such as a job layoff. Many have lost recreation, social support and relationships.

Grief can be part of all of these types of ...

Do Your Genes Up Your Odds for Alcoholism? One Factor Cuts the Risk

Even when genetics and personality are working against you, having a strong network of supportive friends and family may help lower alcoholism risk, researchers say.

"Genes play an important role in alcohol use," stressed Jinni Su, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University in Tempe, and lead author of a new study.

But "genes are not our destiny," she added.

In 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDC

America's waistline keeps widening.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 16 states now have at least 35% of their residents who are obese, a number that's nearly doubled since 2018.

The CDC's 2020 Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps now show that Delaware, Iowa, Ohio and Texas have joined Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana,...

Medical Paperwork: So Bad Some Folks Skip Care

Getting prior authorizations to see a specialist, dealing with errors on medical bills and even scheduling appointments can be a big hassle.

That's clear to anyone who has spent time on the phone handling issues with insurance companies or doctors' offices.

For some patients, in fact, it's a hurdle that's caused them to delay or even forgo needed medical care.

"It is the thi...

Is There a Link Between Vaping and Eating Disorders in the Young?

College students who vape appear to be at higher risk of having an eating disorder, a new study suggests.

"The study's findings are especially relevant as we have seen a surge in referrals for eating disorders and substance use disorders during the pandemic," said study author Dr. Jason Nagata. He is an assistant professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of California, S...

In Your Sights: How Eye Contact Enhances a Conversation

Seeing eye to eye -- literally -- makes conversations more appealing, a new study finds.

"Eye contact is really immersive and powerful," said researcher Sophie Wohltjen, a graduate student in psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth College.

"When two people are having a conversation, eye contact signals that shared attention is high -- that they are in peak synchrony with one ...

Anxious? Maybe You Can Exercise It Away

Anxiety prevention may be just a snowy trail away.

New research suggests cross-country skiers -- and perhaps others who also exercise vigorously -- are less prone to develop anxiety disorders than less active folks.

Researchers in Sweden spent roughly two decades tracking anxiety risk among more than 395,000 Swedes. Nearly half the participants were skiers with a history of competin...

Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • September 12, 2021
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  • Would More Free Time Really Make You Happier?

    Many people feel their to-do list is overloaded, but there is also such a thing as too much free time, a new study suggests.

    In a series of studies, researchers found that having either too little or too much free time seemed to drain people's sense of well-being.

    It's no surprise that constantly feeling pressed for time -- and the stress that creates -- can take a toll on well-bein...

    Postponing Retirement Might Help Keep Dementia at Bay

    Early retirement may sound appealing, but a recent study hints that putting it off a few years might help older adults retain more of their mental sharpness.

    Using data on more than 20,000 older Americans, researchers estimated that if all of those people waited until age 67 to retire, their collective cognitive health would benefit.

    "Cognition" refers to a person's ability to think...

    Feel Guilty About 'Useless' Leisure Time? Your Mental Health Might Suffer

    Struggling to decide whether to spend another hour at the office or take a late afternoon stroll?

    Put on your walking shoes.

    Making leisure time a priority is good for your mental health. For many, though, especially folks who prize productivity above all, it's a hard sell, a new study finds.

    "There is plenty of research which suggests that leisure has mental health benefits ...

    Too Much Screen Time Could Raise Your Odds for Stroke

    You've heard the warnings about kids who are forever glued to their screens, but all that screen time can have devastating health effects for grown-ups.

    If you're under 60, too much time using a computer, watching TV or reading could boost your risk for a stroke, Canadian researchers warn.

    "Be aware that very high sedentary time with little time spent on physical activity can have a...

    Delta Variant Has Americans' Stress Levels Rising Again: Poll

    As coronavirus cases spike in the United States due to the highly contagious Delta variant, a new poll finds Americans' anxiety about COVID-19 at its highest since January.

    "I wouldn't have said this a couple of years ago, but I'm not as confident as I was in America's ability to take care of itself," David Bowers, 42, a Peoria, Ariz., Democrat told the Associated Press, adding: ...

    Humans, Take Note: Cats Prefer the Lazy Way to Dinner

    Want Fluffy to eat? Don't make her work for her supper.

    Given the choice between a readily available meal tray and solving a puzzle to get at their nosh, 17 domestic cats in a new study took the easy way out.

    "It wasn't that cats never used the food puzzle, but cats ate more food from the tray, spent more time at the tray and made more first choices to approach and...

    Only 1 in 10 Kids With ADHD Will Outgrow It

    Struggling with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a child is heart-breaking enough, but now new research confirms what many have long suspected: These patients will often continue to be plagued by ADHD symptoms as adults.

    Only about one in 10 kids with the disorder are likely to have a full and lasting remission of their symptoms, according to new data gleaned from tracki...

    College Freshmen Drank Less as Pandemic Began

    Here's an unexpected silver lining to the pandemic: New research shows there was a decline in overall drinking and binge drinking among U.S. college freshmen during the early months of the new coronavirus' spread across America.

    "We found that social factors, like social distancing and reductions in social support from friends, were associated with decreases in alcohol use among first-yea...

    Sit All Day for Work? Simple Step Can Cut Your Health Risk

    Take a work break: A small, new study suggests that getting out of your chair every half hour may help improve your blood sugar levels and your overall health.

    Every hour spent sitting or lying down increases the risk for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, the study authors said. But moving around during those sedentary hours is an easy way to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce t...

    Heading Back to the Workplace? Here's Some Tips to Help Re-Adjust

    Freaked out about trading Zoom meetings and the privacy of working at home for a return to the office?

    You've got plenty of company. As more workplaces reopen, stress about health risks and new routines is front and center.

    The Center for Workplace Mental Health knows what you're are going through. The center, a program of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Foundation, is of...

    Death of Spouse Could Raise Men's Odds for Prostate Cancer

    Widowers have a higher risk for advanced prostate cancer than men who are part of a couple, Canadian researchers say.

    The new findings are from an analysis of 12 studies comparing 14,000 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 12,000 healthy men.

    The study -- recently published in the European Journal of Epidemiology -- suggests that social environment is an important ...

    Daily Half-Hour Walk Can Greatly Boost Survival After Stroke

    After a stroke, survivors can greatly increase their odds for many more years of life through activities as easy as a half-hour's stroll each day, new research shows.

    The nearly five-year-long Canadian study found that stroke survivors who walked or gardened at least three to four hours a week (about 30 minutes a day), cycled at least two to three hours per week, or got an equivalent amou...

    Americans Have High Trust in Health Care Providers: Poll

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News ) -- Doctors, nurses and pharmacists are highly trusted by most Americans, a new survey shows.

    Those health professionals do what's right either most or all of the time, said at least seven in 10 respondents in the poll from the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Res...

    Gruesome Cigarette Warnings May Work on Smokers: Study

    Gangrene. Throat cancer. A newborn on a feeding tube.

    Gruesome warning images like those on cigarette packs do indeed scare smokers, but they should be combined with other anti-smoking measures, a new study finds.

    These kinds of graphic warning labels were approved by U.S. lawmakers in 2009, but implementation has been stalled until legal challenges to the law by the tobacco industr...

    6 Tips on Getting Back to Your Regular Doctor's Checkup

    Admit it, you've probably put off doctor visits whenever possible during the pandemic, and getting back on track with your health care is a daunting prospect.

    Never fear, says an expert who offers some advice on resuming in-person health care visits.

    The first step is to push aside any shame about falling behind on regular appointments, said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, president of...

    Gun Sales in Homes With Teens Rose During Pandemic

    U.S. gun sales increased early in the COVID-19 pandemic, and many of those firearms ended up in homes with teens, researchers say.

    "This finding is concerning because we know that the single biggest risk factor for adolescent firearm injuries is access to an unsecured firearm," said study co-author Dr. Patrick Carter. He is co-director of the Institute for Firearm Injury Prevention at the...

    Is the Demise of the Doctor's White Coat Near?

    Your doctor walks into the exam room wearing a white coat. Or perhaps your physician has on a fleece or softshell jacket.

    Does it make a difference?

    Yes, according to a survey that sought public perceptions on doctor attire and professionalism in the United States.

    The lay public still appears to associate the traditional white coat with experience and professionalism, said st...

    Text 'Nudges' May Help Boost Vaccination Rates

    Text "nudges" about easy access to COVID-19 vaccines can increase vaccination rates, even among people hesitant to get a shot, a new study suggests.

    "We found that text messages stressing the accessibility of the vaccine -- and that included ownership language, such as that the vaccine has just been made available to you and to claim your dose today -- significantly increased vaccine upt...

    Pandemic Boosted Paranoia and Conspiracy Theories, Study Confirms

    The COVID-19 pandemic upended life in the United States in many ways. Now, a new study confirms another effect: paranoia and belief in conspiracy theories, especially in areas with low adherence to mask mandates.

    "Our psychology is massively impacted by the state of the world around us," said study author Phil Corlett, an associate professor of psychology at Yale University, in New Haven,...

    Only Republican 'Elites' Will Convince Some Vaccine Resisters to Get the Shot: Study

    Republicans who say they won't get the COVID-19 vaccine are more likely to reconsider their stance if high-profile Republicans urge them to take the jab, a new study finds.

    Similar vaccination pleas from Democratic sources may actually harden their resistance, researchers found.

    Unvaccinated Republicans exposed to an endorsement by Republican elites like former President Donald Trum...

    How Trust in Science Can Make You Vulnerable to 'Pseudoscience'

    Trusting science is good, but it could put you at risk for being duped by false science, or "pseudoscience," if you let your guard down, researchers warn.

    Investigators found that people who trust science are more likely to believe and share false claims that contain scientific references than those who don't trust science.

    "We conclude that trust in science, although desirable in m...

    Addictive, Harmful Vaping Is Super Cool on TikTok

    Watch videos on TikTok and you're likely to see plenty of positive portrayals of vaping, a new study shows.

    And that's a problem, according to researchers, who call for tighter regulation of the platform popular with kids and teens.

    "Viewing other young people, friends, acquaintances or influencers vaping in fun and entertaining contexts, is likely to normalize e-cigarette use and m...

    Want to Avoid Sleep Apnea? Get Off the Sofa

    Here's yet another reason to limit screen time and get moving: Boosting your activity levels could reduce your risk of sleep apnea, according to a new study.

    Compared to the most active people in the study, those who spent more than four hours a day sitting watching TV had a 78% higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and those with sedentary jobs had a 49% higher risk.

    And th...

    Could Coffee, Veggies Lower Your Odds for COVID-19?

    Coffee delivers the boost that many people need to start their day. Now, new research suggests this breakfast powerhouse may also provide some protection against COVID-19.

    Consuming vegetables and having been breastfed might also reduce your COVID-19 risk, according to the new study from Northwestern University in Chicago. Conversely, processed meats may increase your susceptibility to th...

    Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

    Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination -- advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

    But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll reveal...

    Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: Study

    An active mind in old age may delay Alzheimer's disease by up to five years, a new study suggests.

    Activities like reading, writing letters, playing cards or doing puzzles may prolong brain health even for those in their 80s, researchers say.

    "The key element is that you're processing information," said lead researcher Robert Wilson, a professor in the neurological sciences departme...

    Most Romantic Couples Started Out as Friends, Study Finds

    Some think that romance begins when two strangers catch each other's eye across a crowded room. Others seek it out by swiping right.

    But new research suggests that more than two-thirds of all romantic relationships begin as friendships.

    It's a question that Danu Anthony Stinson and her collaborators have been asking for a long time while studying relationship initiation.

    "We s...

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