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11 May

Will The COVID-19 Lockdown Lead To A New Baby Boom?

Fears over potential pregnancy problems and the recession may postpone family planning, new study finds.

30 Mar

6 Tips For Stopping Coronavirus Scammers

Important ways to protect your health and money.

Health News Results - 422

The Family Cat Could Be Good Medicine for Kids With Autism

Cats have a long history of boosting people's moods and brightening their days. And that's probably true for kids on the autism spectrum as well, new research shows.

The small study suggests that adopting a shelter cat may help reduce separation anxiety and improve empathy in kids with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

"Cats, and companion animals in general, offer uncond...

A Promising New Therapy Against OCD?


Noninvasive electrical stimulation of the brain, fine-tuned to specific "circuitry" gone awry, might help ease obsessive-compulsive behaviors, an early study hints.

Researchers found that the brain stimulation, delivered over five days, reduced obsessive-compulsive tendencies for three months, though in people who did not have full-blown obsessive-compulsive...

'Mindfulness' on Your Mind? It Has Limits, Review Finds

Mindfulness is all the rage when it comes to boosting mental health, but new research suggests that it may not help everyone equally.

Practicing mindfulness meditation -- which involves paying close attention to what you are feeling in the moment -- may be better than doing nothing at all to improve anxiety, depression or lower stress, but it is not a cure-all and may not be any better th...

Coping With Anxiety, Fear During a Rocky Presidential Transition

The nation is in a state of shock and outrage over Wednesday's riotous siege on the U.S. Capitol Building by supporters of President Donald Trump, and there could be still worse to come before the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

So, taking care of your mental and physical health will be important in the coming days of trial and tribulation in the United States, American...

'Pandemic Fatigue' Setting in? Here's How to Stay Safe and Strong

The COVID-19 pandemic may feel like it's been going on forever, but it's important to keep up safety measures, a mental health expert says.

Dr. Olusinmi Bamgbose, a psychiatrist at Cedars-Sinai in Southern California -- an area that's facing an unprecedented surge in coronavirus cases -- offered some tips for keeping up with pandemic safeguards and some theories about why people may be ba...

Is Self-Control the Key to a Long, Healthy Life?

If your children are well-behaved, do they stand a greater chance of having healthy, happy lives as adults?

A new study says yes.

After tracking just over 1,000 New Zealanders from birth to the age of 45, investigators found that kids who were goal-oriented and better able to restrain their thoughts, behavior and emotions turned out to have healthier bodies and brains by the time th...

Hope Can Save People From Making Bad Choices: Study

Hope may help prevent you from doing things that aren't good for you, a new study claims.

The investigators wanted to find out why some people are more likely to fall into risky behaviors, such as gambling, drinking too much, taking drugs and overeating.

To do this, the team at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom focused on something called relative deprivation, whic...

When Soda Tax Repealed, Soda Sales Rebound: Study

After a short-lived tax on sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages was repealed, consumption of sugary drinks in an Illinois County escalated again, according to a new study.


The tax was pitched to reduce Cook County budget deficits. It lasted four months -- from Aug. 2 to Dec. 1, 2017, the researchers said.

"We know that the tax worked to bring down demand fo...

Got Wanderlust? Travel Makes Folks Happier, Study Shows

It might be tough to imagine jetting off to far-flung destinations right now, but new research shows that people who love to travel are happier than homebodies.

Chun-Chu (Bamboo) Chen, an assistant professor in the School of Hospitality Business Management at Washington State University Vancouver, surveyed 500 people to find out why some travel more than others and if travel experiences a...

Stressed Out in Lockdown, America's Young Adults Are Overeating

When the coronavirus pandemic started, many people began baking banana bread and sourdough loaves at home. Stress eating is nothing new, and 2020 was a year filled with angst for a lot of people.

But researchers at the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, wondered, "Are college-aged people overeating, too?" According to their new study, the answer is "yes."

...

Roll Over, Fido. You're Hogging the Bed

Forget buying a dog bed. New research shows that nearly half of pet parents say their pooches co-sleep in their owner's bed.

More than 1,000 Australian dog owners participated in the study conducted by Canisius College in Buffalo, N.Y.

About 49% of participants, who ranged in age from 18 to 78, said their dog sleeps in their bed. Another 20% said their dog sleeps in the same bedroom...

How to Make Your New Year's Resolutions Stick

If you find it difficult to keep New Year's resolutions, try rephrasing them.

Reformulating a resolution from "I will quit/avoid" to "I will start to" could improve the chances of success, researchers in Sweden say.

They looked at more than 1,000 people who made resolutions at the end of 2017 and followed them for the next year.

Participants were divided into three groups that...

Despite Setbacks, Reason for Hope Against COVID as 2020 Ends

As 2020 careens to a close, one thing is clear: With infections topping 19 million and a death toll over 333,000, the COVID-19 pandemic has upended nearly every facet of American life.

As a new year nears, two leaders in the response to the pandemic talked over mistakes made, hard lessons learned and new reasons for hope.

No one can say the United States has performed well against C...

Mask Wearing Declines, Even as COVID-19 Touches More U.S. Lives: Poll

Despite more Americans saying they know someone who's been sickened or even died from COVID-19, there's been a decline in the percentage who say they always wear a mask when they leave their home.

Two-thirds (66%) of U.S. adults surveyed in a new HealthDay/Harris Poll said they "always" donned a mask when leaving their home and weren't able to socially distance, compared with 72%...

Involved Dads Make a Difference for Disadvantaged Teens

Dads matter: New research shows how attentive, involved fathers can really boost the mental well-being and behavior of teens from low-income families.

The study looked at 5,000 U.S. children born between 1998 and 2000, and their fathers' involvement with them between ages 5 and 15.

That included activities such as feeding, playing, reading, helping with homework and providing non-c...

Do Genes Doom Some Kids to Obesity? Probably Not, Study Finds

While childhood obesity is a significant challenge, German researchers have uncovered some hopeful news while investigating the impact of genes.

Though some "obesity genes" do play a minor role in the success of weight loss interventions, environmental, social and behavioral factors make the biggest difference, according to a new study from the Technical University of Munich.

Those ...

Most Americans Oppose COVID Vaccine Mandates: Survey

Though many Americans would support a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, a Gallup survey finds there is no clear majority in favor of it.

The Gallup Panel conducted the online survey of 2,730 U.S. adults between Sept. 14 and 27.

Nearly 49% of respondents said they would "accept" a state mandate requiring children to be vaccinated in order to attend school. But support fell to 41% when respo...

Pandemic Tied to Higher Suicide Rate in Blacks, Lowered Rate in Whites: Study

The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated racial divides in health care in numerous ways, and a new study reveals yet another: Suicides among Black people doubled during COVID-19 lockdowns, while suicides in white individuals were cut in half during the same period.

"In past pandemics, there has been noted rises in suicide, and the COVID-19 pandemic seemed like the perfect storm for suicid...

Loneliness Continues to Rise for Americans Under Lockdown

Loneliness, particularly among folks under shelter-in-place orders, is a growing issue for Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, new research finds.

More people report they are feeling lonely, depressed and even harboring thoughts of suicide as COVID-19 cases in the United States soar. And those who are chafing under lockdown or other stay-at-home restrictions appear to be at the gre...

Young Republicans Much Less Likely to Wear Masks, Social Distance: Study

Republicans have downplayed the importance of masking and social distancing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new study shows that message has filtered down to the party's youngest voting members.

Nearly one out of every four young adults from the Los Angeles region who identify as Republicans said they do not regularly follow social distancing guidelines, according to a report publ...

Too Much Social Media Time Could Raise Risk of Depression

Young adults who spend hours a day on social media are at heightened risk of developing depression in the near future, new research suggests.

In recent years, a number of studies have linked heavy social media use to an increased risk of depression.

"But then you have to ask the chicken-and-egg question," said study author Dr. Brian Primack, a professor of public health at the Unive...

Sports Might Be Good Therapy for Boys With Behavioral Issues: Study

Participation in organized sports could help reduce behavior problems in very young boys, a new study of Irish kids suggests.

One-year-old boys with developmental delays were less likely to have developed emotional problems or poor conduct by age 5 if they regularly attended a sports club or group, researchers reported recently in The Journal of Pediatrics.

"Think about it ...

Caregivers Feeling the Strain This Tough Holiday Season

The coronavirus pandemic makes the holidays even more difficult for caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, an expert says.

"Even in the best of times, holidays can be a mixed bag for families who are caring for a loved one with an age-related illness that causes physical and mental changes. Focus on family togetherness and joy," said Mary Catherine ...

Pandemic Could Be Golden Time for Narcissists: Study

The coronavirus pandemic is giving some narcissists a chance to bask in the admiration of others, a new study suggests.

It found that narcissists who are essential workers -- including those in restaurants and retail stores -- love their "hero" status.

"The word 'hero' is a trigger for narcissists," explained study co-author Amy Brunell, an associate professor of psychology at Ohio ...

Junk Food, Booze Often Star in America's Hit Movies

If there was an Oscar for "most unhealthy food in a leading role," many of America's most popular movies would be serious contenders.

That's the conclusion of a new review of food content featured in 250 top-grossing U.S. movies. More often than not, the fictional food choices were so bad they wouldn't make the cut of real-world dietary recommendations, the study authors said.

"The ...

Many Young Americans Lonely, Depressed During Pandemic: Survey

Loneliness, anxiety, depression and substance use have increased sharply among young American adults during the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey shows.

Over 1,000 people aged 18 to 35 took part in the online anonymous questionnaire between April 22 and May 11, 2020. Nearly half reported high levels of loneliness, eight in 10 had significant depressive symptoms, and more than 60% said they had ...

Working Women Show Sharper Memory With Age

Women who work outside the home may end up with a sharper memory later in life, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among nearly 6,200 U.S. women aged 55 and older, those who'd worked for pay in young adulthood and middle-age were less prone to memory decline, versus those who'd stayed out of the labor force.

The link was seen whether women were married or single, or had ch...

'Tough Guy' Mentality Keeps Athletes in Denial About Pain

A culture of toughness and resilience is encouraged among elite college rowers, but it can keep them from reporting injuries, a new study finds.

There's an overall myth among athletes that admitting pain is a sign of weakness and failure, the researchers said.

Irish and Australian rowers in this study felt compromised by lower back pain, which is common in the sport, the st...

Politics Key to Americans' Views on COVID-19, Poll Shows

The new coronavirus holds no political views. The pathogen's only aim is to infect, spread and thrive.

But in what is surely no surprise in a deeply divided America, it turns out that your political views play a large role in your attitude towards COVID-19 prevention efforts.

Republicans tend to be much less worried than Democrats about the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore l...

Most Americans Want to End Seasonal Time Changes: Survey

As most of America prepares for the Nov. 1 return of standard time, 63% want one fixed, year-round time, a new survey finds.

"Evidence of the negative impacts of seasonal time changes continue to accumulate, and there is real momentum behind the push to end seasonal time changes," said Dr. Kannan Ramar, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), which favors a fi...

One Big Reason Women May Be Less Prone to COVID-19

One of the reasons women may be less vulnerable to COVID-19 is because they're more likely to adhere to social distancing policies, a new survey suggests.

A survey conducted in eight countries in March and April found substantial gender differences both in numbers of people who considered COVID-19 to be a serious health crisis and who agreed with public policies to help fight the pand...

Is Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?

Older adults who aren't interested or enthusiastic about their usual activities may have a higher risk of developing dementia, new research suggests.

The nine-year study of more than 2,000 older adults -- average age 74 -- found that people with severe apathy (a lack of interest or concern) were 80% more likely to develop dementia during the study period than those with low apath...

Could Virtual Training Help Parents of Kids With Autism Manage Behavior?

Virtual training is effective in teaching parents of children with autism about early behavioral intervention, according to a new study.

The alternative to in-person training is the only option for many parents during the coronavirus pandemic or for those who can't attend in-person sessions for other reasons.

"Since parents play an important role in the treatment of their ch...

Want Better Rapport With Your Cat? Bat Your Eyes

When it comes to bonding with your cat, the eyes have it.

Narrowing your eyes -- the so-called "slow blink" -- may make humans more attractive to their feline friends, British researchers suggest. It also may make kitty smile back.

"As someone who has both studied animal behavior and is a cat owner, it's great to be able to show that cats and humans can communicate in this w...

Early School Sports Reduce ADHD Symptoms Years Later for Girls

Girls who played after-school sports in elementary school seem to have fewer symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) once they reach middle school, a new study suggests.

The research included both boys and girls, but the effect of sports on attention and behavior symptoms was only significant in girls.

"Girls, in particular, benefit from participation i...

Me, Me, Me: Narcissists Drawn to Politics, Study Shows

It's all about him. Or her.

New research supports what much of the electorate may already suspect: Many narcissistic people are drawn to politics, and that could put democracy in danger.

As the researchers defined it, narcissism is a combination of selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration.

"Successful democratic functioning requires trust in institutions...

Do Fasting Diets Really Work? New Study Finds Little Benefit

More and more people are turning to "intermittent fasting" to lose weight, but the jury is still out on whether the tactic works.

In a new clinical trial, researchers found that one type of intermittent fasting did help overweight and obese adults drop a couple of pounds over 12 weeks. But they fared no better than a comparison group who ate whenever they wanted.

The finding...

COVID Conflicts Are Putting Big Strains on Relationships

As the coronavirus pandemic wears on, it's clear that not everyone's on the same page when it comes to preventing the risk of infection.

Lots of people wear masks, try to maintain social distancing and avoid large gatherings. But plenty of others forgo a mask or wear it on their chin, go to busy bars and attend social gatherings, like weddings.

Both sides think they're righ...

Black Kids at Higher Odds for ADHD

Current wisdom holds that white kids are at greater risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than Black children are, but a new analysis finds the opposite is true.

In a review of 21 previously published U.S. studies, which included nearly 155,000 Black children in the United States, researchers found that 14.5% of these children had ADHD. That's much higher than t...

Does Hostility Predispose You to a Second Heart Attack?

If you have experienced a heart attack and you have an adversarial personality, new research suggests you might want to consider an attitude adjustment.

An angry outlook may make you vulnerable to a second heart attack, the new study found.

The study included more than 2,300 heart attack survivors, average age 67, who were followed for 24 months. Men accounted for 68% of...

Almost 14 Million U.S. Adults Vape, With Use Rising Fastest in Young

The number of Americans using electronic cigarettes is soaring, especially among youth, a new study finds.

Nearly 14 million U.S. adults vaped in 2018, up from just over 11 million adults in 2016. The increase was seen in all socioeconomic groups, the researchers found.

"An increasing number of individuals are using e-cigarettes, especially in the younger age groups, which...

Eating in the Evening Could Be Bad for Your Health

To get a handle on your eating habits, keep a close eye on the clock, researchers suggest.

Consuming most of your daily calories in the evening is associated with a less nutritious diet and higher calorie intake, a new study shows.

Unfortunately, hunger pangs are often strongest later in the day. And this pattern could influence both the type and amount of food we eat, the s...

Being a Jerk Not a Recipe for Getting Ahead at Work

Being a selfish jerk won't pave a path to success, new research suggests.

The study involved hundreds of participants who completed personality assessments when they were undergraduates or MBA students at three universities.

The researchers checked in with the same people about 14 years later to find out how well they'd done in their careers, and their co-workers were asked ...

Most Americans Wear Masks, But Myths Linger: Poll

Americans are generally well-versed about the use of masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19, although knowledge gaps about face coverings persist, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll reveals.

About nine in 10 Americans said they are knowledgeable about mask-wearing and that they sometimes, often or always wear a mask when they leave their home and are unable to social distance, the online po...

Lockdowns Tough on People With Eating Disorders: Survey

The coronavirus pandemic has brought significant challenges for people with eating disorders, a new study finds.

During the early stages of the pandemic lockdown in the United Kingdom, researchers at Northumbria University in Newcastle surveyed people who currently had an eating disorder or were recovering from one.

In all, 87% of the survey respondents said their sympto...

When Parents, Grandparents Don't Agree on Childrearing Choices

Disagreements between parents and grandparents over parenting choices like discipline, meals and TV time can strain family relationships, a new poll finds.

When kids stay with grandparents, relaxed rules can cause friction with the child's parents, child health experts noted.

According to the poll, nearly 50% of parents said they have disagreements with one or more gra...

NYC Shoppers Prefer Stores That Enforce Social Distancing, Study Finds

New York City residents are more likely to shop in stores where social distancing is practiced than where it is ignored, a new study finds.

"We want to understand how people are making decisions based on compliance with the health guidelines," said Ricardo Daziano, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y.

"Until a vac...

Feeling Anxious? Yoga Can Help Soothe You

Yoga may help people soothe frayed nerves during the coronavirus pandemic, but the ancient practice may also help those with more serious, chronic forms of anxiety, new research suggests.

The study compared yoga, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and stress management for treating people with generalized anxiety disorder. While cognitive behavioral therapy remains the preferred firs...

Narcissists Are Blind to Their Own Mistakes

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't acknowledge them, a new study shows.

When faced with a poor outcome due to their decisions, most people ask, "What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?" But a narcissist says, "No one could have seen this coming," according to Oregon State University (OSU)-Cascades researchers.

Narcissists also b...

Spanking on the Decline in American Homes

American kids have something to celebrate: Spanking has hit a new low.

About one in three parents said they spanked their kids in 2017 compared to 50% in 1993, new research shows.

"Fewer parents are spanking, and I think it's helpful for people to know that and that there are tools that are more effective than spanking," said Christopher Mehus, lead author of a new stu...

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