Get Healthy!

Results for search "Imaging Devices".

Health News Results - 34

Placebo Effect Plays Big Role in Antidepressant's Impact on Anxiety: Study

Illustrating the power of the mind to heal itself, new research suggests that the placebo effect could help drive antidepressants' effects against anxiety disorders.

The placebo effect refers to an increase in the success of a treatment when a patient expects a benefit.

In the new study, patients with s...

Researchers Find Better Way to Fight Breast Cancer That Has Spread to Brain

Researchers may have found a noninvasive way to temporarily open the brain's borders to allow tumor-fighting medication inside.

By necessity, the brain is shielded by a layer of specialized cells called the blood-brain barrier. Its job is to allow needed substances in -- like oxygen and sugar -- while keeping out substances that could be toxic.

Unfortunately, that means medications ...

Shape, Size of Brain Arteries May Predict Stroke Risk

The size and shape of the blood vessels in your brain may help predict your risk of an often-fatal type of stroke, called an aneurysm, a new study finds.

An aneurysm is a bulge in an artery wall.

"A subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most dangerous type of stroke and occurs when a brain aneurysm leaks or ruptures, causing bleeding into the brain, killing more than 50% of affected peop...

Tracking Key Protein Helps Predict Outcomes in TBI Patients

When people suffer a severe head injury, it's hard to predict how they will fare in the long run. But a new study suggests that something fairly simple — measuring a protein in the blood — could help.

The protein, called neurofilament light (NfL), is a component of the nerve fibers brain cells use to transmit signals. Damage to those fibers (called axons) is known to foretell a high...

Can a Computer Program Help Docs Spot Breast Cancer?

An artificial intelligence tool could help radiologists spot breast cancer on ultrasound images and reduce the need for extra testing, new research suggests.

"Our study demonstrates how artificial intelligence can help radiologists reading breast ultrasound exams to reveal only those that show real signs of breast cancer, and to avoid verification by biopsy in cases that turn out to be be...

New Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the Brain

Behaviors associated with eating disorders can make real changes to the brain, new research shows. The findings could help explain why these serious disorders are often chronic -- and may also point the way to new treatments.

Eating disorders -- such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eating disorder -- can result in severe complications, including death. Related behaviors include bi...

Brain Study Suggests Autism Develops Differently in Girls Than Boys

Autism appears to develop differently in girls and boys, so the findings of research conducted mainly with boys might not apply to girls, a new study suggests.

Autism spectrum disorder is four times more common in boys, which may help explain why there's far less research about autism in girls.

"This new study provides us with a roadmap for understanding how to better match current ...

Too Much Red Meat Might Harm Your Heart

If you've ever scoffed at warnings that too much red or processed meat is bad for the heart while oily fish is good for you, there's now some visual evidence to support that advice.

British researchers used heart imaging to see how these foods affected volunteers' heart health.

The images revealed that those who ate more red and processed meat had poorer heart function, smaller vent...

New First Look at the Tiniest Babies' Lungs

Researchers who recorded the most detailed images ever made of newborns' lungs as they took their first breaths say the breakthrough could improve treatment of breathing problems in babies.

"Respiratory problems are the most common reason we need to treat babies in intensive care," said researcher David Tingay of Murdoch Children's Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia.

"This n...

Underarm Lump After COVID Shot Is Likely Lymph Swelling, Not Breast Cancer, Experts Say

That swollen lymph node under your arm could be a temporary side effect of a COVID-19 shot and not a sign of serious health problems.

Radiologists from Massachusetts General Hospital noticed an increase in patients with swollen underarm lymph nodes as they were doing routine mammogram screenings. So they established an approach to help prevent delays in both vaccinations and breast cancer...

Modern Medicine Unwraps Mystery of Ancient Mummy's Death

Modern technology has unraveled an ancient mystery about the death of an Egyptian king.

Computed tomography (CT) scans of the mummified remains of Pharaoh Seqenenre Taa II, the Brave, revealed new details about his head injuries not previously found in examinations since his mummy was discovered in the 1880s. Those examinations, including an X-ray study in the 1960s, had found that the...

Each Day Sober Slowly Helps Alcoholics' Brains Recover

A new brain scan study shows why the "one day at a time" approach works for recovering alcoholics.

"For people with AUD [alcohol use disorder], the brain takes a long time to normalize, and each day is going to be a struggle," explained senior study author Rajita Sinha, a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at Yale University's Child Study Center. "For these people, it really is ...

Many Thyroid Cancer Ultrasound Scans Unnecessary

As many as one-third of doctors may be sending patients for a thyroid ultrasound for reasons not supported by guidelines, a new study finds.

The use of ultrasound to detect thyroid cancer has led to a large increase in thyroid cancer cases, but many of these cancers are low-risk and won't cause serious harm, the study authors explained.

For the study, the researchers quest...

Brain's Iron Stores May Be Key to Alzheimer's

The progression of Alzheimer's disease may accelerate as iron deposits build up in the brain, a new study finds, hinting at a possible role for the mineral in mental decline.

Using MRI scans of 200 older adults with and without Alzheimer's, researchers found that those with the disease generally had higher iron levels in various parts of the brain. And 17 months later, Alzheimer's pat...

Placenta's Hidden Mysteries Revealed in MRI Study

MRI imaging has uncovered key differences in blood flow to the placenta in pregnant women who are healthy and those with preeclampsia.

That could help explain why babies born to mothers with preeclampsia -- dangerously high blood pressure during pregnancy -- are often smaller and premature, according to researchers at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom.

The ...

Key Areas of the Brain Triggered in Recent Heart Attack Survivors

People who've recently had a heart attack show increased activity in the area of the brain involved in stress and emotions. And this is associated with elevated inflammation in arteries, a small, preliminary study finds.

"The results of this study advance our understanding of the interconnections among the brain, bone marrow and blood vessels," said study lead author Dr. Dong Oh Kang,...

Cuddling Brings Two Minds Together, MRI Study Reveals

Love to cuddle up? It might bring a 'mind meld,' too, new research shows.

People in close physical contact appear to have synchronized brain patterns, a revolutionary new MRI technique has revealed.

A functional MRI scan of two people cuddling under a blanket showed that their brains appeared to be falling into similar patterns of action and response, as they took turns gent...

Long Periods in Space Alter Astronauts' Brains

Long periods of time in space may cause brain volume increases in astronauts, new research shows.

Extended periods in space have long been known to cause vision problems. And more than half of International Space Station crew members have reported vision changes.

Increased pressure inside the head might contribute to vision problems, scientists have suggested.

To l...

Brain Plaques Signal Alzheimer's Even Before Other Symptoms Emerge: Study

Even before symptoms develop, the brains of people with early Alzheimer's disease have high levels of amyloid protein plaques, a new study reveals.

Those levels in older adults with no dementia symptoms are associated with a family history of disease, lower scores on thinking/memory tests, and declines in daily mental function.

The first findings from the so-called A4 study ...

AI May Not Be Better Than Experts at Reading Medical Scans

A new study casts doubt on claims that artificial intelligence (AI) equals or surpasses the ability of human experts to interpret medical images.

Many previous studies were of poor quality and may have exaggerated the benefits of AI, which could pose a risk to the safety of millions of patients, the study authors claimed.

The investigators reviewed two randomized clinical tr...

Minorities Less Likely to Get Recommended Lung Cancer Imaging

Black and Hispanic Americans are less likely than whites to receive recommended lung cancer imaging, a new study claims.

PET-CT imaging is recommended because it provides doctors the best possible picture of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which helps determine the best treatment for the patient.

The University of Colorado Cancer Center study examined PET-CT use and outc...

Imaging Scans May Lead to Shorter TB Treatment

A new monitoring approach could help improve treatment of patients with tuberculosis (TB), researchers say.

TB is an infectious disease that primarily affects the lungs. Treatment involves multiple pills or injection drugs daily for at least six months. Successful treatment depends on the medications reaching pockets of TB bacteria in the lungs.

Researchers have developed a ...

Scientists Spot Early Markers of Coronavirus in Lungs of Patients

U.S. researchers report they have spotted early, subtle signs in the lungs that point to coronavirus infection.

This could help doctors diagnose patients in the early stages of the disease, when it may not be obvious on lung scans, according to the Mount Sinai Health System doctors.

They say they're the first U.S. experts to analyze chest CT scans of 94 patients in China wit...

Targeted Ultrasound Destroys Cancer Without Harming Healthy Cells: Study

The research is still in its early stages, but scientists say they've developed a low-intensity ultrasound technique that kills cancer cells without damaging healthy cells.

Focused ultrasound is already used to destroy tumors, with most approaches using either high-intensity beams to heat and destroy cells or injected contrast dyes. But both approaches can harm healthy cells and contr...

Study Might Point Alzheimer's Research in Whole New Direction

A new brain scanning technique is shaking up what researchers thought they knew about Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers now say they can predict with reasonable accuracy which brain regions will wither and atrophy in Alzheimer's by identifying the places where tau protein "tangles" have built up.

"You could really predict which brain regions were going to get damaged just on ...

Breast Density Alerts Might Not Be Helping Women

Having dense breast tissue raises a woman's odds for breast cancer, so many states require providers to notify women if a mammogram finds they have dense breast tissue.

But a new study suggests that the notifications may be having little impact in alerting women to their added breast cancer risk.

The goal of dense breast notifications is to spur a conversation between a wom...

Could Brain Scans Spot Children's Mood, Attention Problems Early?

Children's mental health issues are hard to predict until they're causing problems, but researchers may have found a way to use brain scans to spot which kids are at risk for depression, anxiety and attention problems.

"We're facing a tremendous epidemic with teen anxiety and depression, and we wanted to find an early marker that predicted the development of anxiety, depression and a...

Ultrasound May Ease Common Form of Hand Tremor

A treatment that delivers ultrasound waves to the brain may bring lasting relief to some people with debilitating hand tremors, a new study finds.

The study involved 76 patients with essential tremor -- a neurological condition that most often causes trembling in the hands during routine tasks like writing, eating and dressing. It can also affect the legs, head, trunk or voice.

...

Could AI Beat Radiologists at Spotting Bleeds in the Brain?

Computer-driven artificial intelligence (AI) can help protect human brains from the damage wrought by stroke, a new report suggests.

A computer program trained to look for bleeding in the brain outperformed two of four certified radiologists, finding abnormalities in brain scans quickly and efficiently, the researchers reported.

"This AI can evaluate the whole head in one se...

More CT, MRI Scans Being Used, Despite Calls to Cut Back

Despite efforts from medical groups to cut down on the overuse of CT scans and MRIs for safety reasons, their use has instead increased, a new study shows.

"Medical imaging is an important part of health care and contributes to accurate disease diagnosis and treatment, but it also can lead to patient harms such as incidental findings, overdiagnosis, anxiety and radiation exposure that...

Study Points to Harms From MRI 'Dye' in Early Pregnancy

A concerning number of U.S. women are exposed to the MRI contrast agent gadolinium early in pregnancy, a new study reveals.

In many cases, this exposure occurs before women know they're pregnant.

The researchers said their findings underscore the need for effective pregnancy screening measures before using gadolinium, which can cross the placenta and enter fetal circulation....

Pregnant Women Exposed to More Risky CT Scans

Use of risky CT scans during pregnancy has risen significantly in North America in the past two decades, a new study finds.

"It's important to quantify exposure to ionizing radiation because it can cause cancer and birth defects, and should be kept to a minimum, especially during pregnancy," said co-lead author Marilyn Kwan. She's a senior research scientist at Kaiser Permanente North...

Newer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More Lives

A newer form of lung cancer screening may mean fewer deaths from the disease, a new study contends.

Using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) instead of X-rays helped reduce lung cancer deaths in current and former smokers, the study authors said.

"Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and early detection and treatment through screening with low-dose c...

Treatment Advances Making Pancreatic Cancer a Less Deadly Disease

Advances in chemotherapy and cancer monitoring can dramatically extend the lives of almost one-third of pancreatic cancer patients with tumors previously considered inoperable, researchers report.

It's good news for patients with a particularly deadly form of cancer that's been highlighted by the recent diagnosis of "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek with stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

...