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More Kids Injured by Tiny Magnets After Sales Ban Was Lifted: Study


Small, powerful magnets in toys like Buckyballs building sets and jewelry kits are causing an alarming number of serious pediatric injuries in the United States, new research warns.

Analyzing national data, researchers found an 80% rise in these injuries to children from 2016 to 2019, following the repeal of a sales ban on the magnets by a federal court.

Blacks, Hispanics Account for More Than Half of COVID Deaths: Study

Black and Hispanic Americans accounted for more than half of all hospitalized COVID-19 patient deaths in the United States in the early stages of the pandemic, and the hospitals where they were treated may be a factor, researchers say.

For the study, the investigators analyzed data on nearly 7,900 COVID-19 patients admitted to 88 hospitals nationwide between Jan. 17 and July 22, 2020. Of ...

B 11/21 -- Which Kids With COVID Will Get Very Sick?

Scientists have identified symptoms that may predict the severity of COVID-19 in children.

According to the researchers, children with respiratory disease and those with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (a rare but serious condition linked with COVID-19) have the most severe illness.

"Much of the discussion to date around COVID-19 suggests that children don't typically suffer seri...

How Hospitals Can Cut Patients' Falls

A new toolkit to help reduce falls and fall-related injuries among hospital patients is highly effective, a new study shows.

Falls are the leading cause of preventable injury, so researchers set out to create a fall prevention toolkit for patients and their families.

It includes measures such as a laminated poster to display by patients' beds, and personalized prevention plans that ...

Pandemic Protocols Don't Stand in the Way of a Safe Delivery

New infection prevention practices started during the coronavirus pandemic have actually shortened hospital stays for mothers and their babies, a new study finds.

The changes included screening the temperature of all patients and visitors, limiting the number of visitors, providing staff with personal protective equipment, and new protocols for delivery management and newborn care.

...

Coronavirus Cases, Hospitalizations Keep Climbing

On the heels of days of staggering coronavirus case counts, more than 90,000 new infections were reported among Americans on Election Day.

All of the country's five highest days of new COVID-19 cases have been recorded since Oct. 29, confirming fears that another surge has taken hold and will only worsen, CNN reported.

The nationwide seven-day average of new cases now stand...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • November 4, 2020
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  • Full Page
Hospitals Across America Strained by Coronavirus Surge

Hospitals across America were struggling on Tuesday as the new coronavirus struck with a vengeance in parts of the country that had been spared the worst in the early days of the pandemic.

The number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has climbed an estimated 46 percent in the past month, straining the capacity of regional health care systems to respond to overwhelming demand, The N...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
  • |
  • October 28, 2020
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  • Full Page
Knowing What to Expect May Help After Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is common in America, with an attack occurring every 73 seconds. But having supportive care at the emergency department and afterwards can help heal the trauma, Penn State doctors say.

One in five women is raped during their lifetime, yet only 25% report it, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. The closer the relationship is between the vic...

Could Hospital Visit Records Help Docs Spot ADHD, Autism Early?

Kids with autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) go to the hospital more in their first year of life than children without these conditions, according to a new study.

These findings suggest that keeping track of hospital visits may be a new way to identify these conditions early and that might improve outcomes and lower health care costs, researchers say.

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Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms' Breastfeeding

One key to breastfeeding success? Having enough hospital nurses to ensure that new moms get top-notch care.

Hospitals with higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding had nurses who provided more consistent care, according to a new report.

That care included helping moms have skin-to-skin contact with their babies and breastfeed within an hour of giving birth. Nurses also provi...

'Weekend Effect' Affects Survival Odds for Rural Stroke Patients

Stroke patients have a higher risk of death if they're admitted to a rural hospital on the weekend, a new study finds.

University of Georgia researchers analyzed 2016 data on stroke deaths at U.S. hospitals to learn whether the so-called "weekend effect" influenced stroke outcomes.

"The weekend effect is the phenomenon where the risk of bad or adverse outcomes, such as morta...

Bedside COVID-19 Test Faster Than Standard PCR Test

Bedside tests for COVID-19 may speed results and improve infection control, making them better than standard laboratory tests, a new study suggests.

Results of the bedside test take about 2 hours, compared with 21 hours for PCR lab tests, the researchers said. These findings are from more than 1,000 British hospital patients tested with the QIAstat-Dx POCT test.

Reducing t...

Many Older Americans With Heart Failure Take 10 or More Meds

When older people hospitalized for heart failure are sent home, they are often given a whopping 10 medications to take for a variety of conditions. But is this "polypharmacy" practice necessary, or does it just place a bigger burden on already frail patients?

It's not a question so much of the quantity of the medications, but whether the medications patients are taking are the right ...

Blacks, Asians More Likely Than Whites to Have Severe COVID

Black and Asian COVID-19 patients are more likely than white patients to have severe illness, a new British study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1,800 adult COVID-19 patients admitted to King's College Hospital in London between March 1 and June 2.

Patients who were Black or of mixed ethnicity were three times more likely to be admitted to the hospital than ...

Kids' Hospitalizations Accompany Rising Unemployment Rates: Study

COVID-19 has led to widespread job loss in the United States. And now a new study reports that when unemployment rates rise, so do hospitalizations of children.

For the study, researchers analyzed 12 years of data (2002 to 2014) from 14 states. They found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there was a 2% increase in child hospitalizations for all causes, among them d...

Always Be Ready for a Trip to the ER

Accidents happen, and being prepared for an emergency room visit could help speed treatment and reduce anxiety if the need occurs, an expert says.

The first step is determining which ER you want to use in the event of a sudden or severe illness or injury, said Dr. Susan Promes, chair of emergency medicine at Penn State Health Medical Center.

"You'll want to know what's avail...

COVID-19 ICU Patients Have High Risk of Clots, Research Shows

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients face an increased risk of developing dangerous blood clots, a new review indicates.

The odds of a clot are highest for the most critically ill patients. Analysis of 66 studies found that 23% of COVID-19 patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) developed a blood clot in the leg, known as a deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

Overall prevalence of ...

COVID-19 Patients Rarely Survive Cardiac Arrest: Study

Folks whose hearts stop due to a severe case of COVID-19 are very unlikely to leave the hospital alive, a new study shows.

Out of 54 patients at a Michigan hospital who suffered cardiac arrest while battling COVID-19, none survived their illness even though 29 were resuscitated by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the researchers reported.

"I don't think we can say cardia...

Severe Mental Illnesses Often Overlooked at Hospital Admission: Study

Severe mental illness diagnoses often get missed in patients hospitalized for physical health problems, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 13,800 U.K. adults who were diagnosed with severe mental illness, including bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, between 2006 and 2017 and who had more than 45,700 emergency hospital admissions over the period.

'Flattening the Curve' Saves More Lives Than Thought

Failure to "flatten the coronavirus curve" in the United States could lead to even more deaths than previously believed, a new study claims.

The researchers concluded that every six additional intensive care unit (ICU) beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week.

"A spike in hospitalization ...

COVID-19 Takes Heavy Toll on Kidneys

COVID-19 can damage the kidneys and increase patients' risk of needing kidney dialysis, researchers report.

The study authors also warned that doctors should prepare for a significant rise in chronic kidney disease cases due to the pandemic.

For the study, the investigators analyzed data from nearly 4,000 COVID-19 patients, aged 18 and older, hospitalized at the Mount Sinai ...

Blood Pressure Meds Can Affect COVID-19 Care

People with high blood pressure tend to fare worse when infected with COVID-19, and the chronic condition can complicate their treatment in unexpected ways, new research shows.

For example, some COVID-19 patients must be taken off their blood pressure medications if their blood pressure falls to dangerously low levels, a condition called hypotension. Otherwise, they'll risk dying or d...

At One Hospital, ICU Workers' PPE May Have Kept Coronavirus at Bay

The intensive care unit staff had one of the lowest rates of COVID-19 infection among workers at a U.K. hospital system, which suggests their personal protective equipment may have given them added protection, a new study says.

British researchers assessed staff at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust. It's one of the largest hospital trusts in Britain, with more than ...

How One Hospital Kept COVID Transmissions at Nearly Zero

Infection control measures implemented in response to the coronavirus pandemic kept transmission of the virus to patients within a Boston hospital at nearly zero, according to a new study.

The measures at Brigham and Women's Hospital included: masking of all patients, staff and visitors; dedicated COVID-19 units with airborne infection isolation rooms; personal protective equipment in...

Rates of Child Hospitalization Similar Between COVID-19, Flu: Study

While adults face raised odds for hospitalization with COVID-19, a new study shows that the risk for kids infected with SARS-CoV-2 is about equal to that seen with influenza.

The researchers found that kids with COVID-19 or the seasonal flu have similar rates of hospitalization, admission to intensive care units (ICUs) and ventilator use.

But the average age of children hosp...

Asthma May Not Boost Odds of Severe COVID-19

New research may have people with asthma breathing a little easier: Doctors found the airway disease doesn't raise the risk of being hospitalized due to COVID-19.

The researchers also noted that people with asthma weren't more likely than people without it to need a ventilator to help them breathe.

"A lot of people with asthma think they have a predisposition to severe COV...

COVID-19 Ills No Greater for Those With Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis

People with lupus aren't at increased risk of hospitalization from COVID-19 due to steroidal medications they take to reduce immune system activity, a new study finds.

And a related study found that people with inflammatory forms of arthritis -- such as rheumatoid arthritis -- aren't more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than people without arthritis.

Both studies wer...

Many Hospital Workers Infected With Coronavirus Don't Show Symptoms

A new study of 13 U.S. medical centers finds that 6% of staff tested positive for prior infection with the new coronavirus, with almost half (44%) having no idea they'd ever contracted SARS-CoV-2.

In the study, blood antibody testing of more than 3,200 doctors, nurses and other hospital staff was conducted between early April and mid-June. About 1 in 16 of the tests came up po...

Minorities Hit Hardest by COVID-19, Study Confirms

A new report adds to data suggesting that the coronavirus pandemic is even tougher on U.S. minorities than it is on whites.

The research, from the University of Minnesota, shows that Black and Hispanic Americans, as well as American Indians and Alaskan Natives, are much more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than their white peers.

For the study, the research team trac...

Hospitals Full, Doctors Treated Her Severe COVID-19 at Home

New York City resident Jeanne Jennings was so sick with COVID-19 she couldn't draw a decent breath.

"Even going from my bed to the bathroom was such a difficult task, I felt like I was going to pass out," Jennings, 46, said.

Jennings wanted to go to the hospital, but this was early May, the height of the Big Apple's COVID-19 crisis, and over the phone her doctor laid out the...

Blood Test Might Spot Most Dangerous COVID-19 Cases

A simple blood test may predict which COVID-19 patients are likely to get worse and die, a new study suggests.

"When we first started treating COVID-19 patients, we watched them get better or get worse, but we didn't know why," said researcher Dr. Juan Reyes. He's an assistant professor of medicine at the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Washington, D.C.

Many COVID-19 Patients Given Useless Antibiotics: Study

Early in the U.S. coronavirus pandemic, many people landing in the hospital may have been given unnecessary antibiotics, a new study suggests.

The findings come from one of the hard-hit hospitals in New York City, the initial epicenter of the U.S. pandemic. Researchers there found that of COVID-19 patients admitted between March and May, just over 70% were given antibiotics.

...

COVID-19 Fears Had Sick, Injured Americans Avoiding ERs

Visits to hospital emergency rooms fell off sharply in March when the COVID-19 pandemic started keeping people at home -- and a new study reports they never returned to normal.

"This is a case where public messaging appears to have worked too well," said researcher Dr. Edward Melnick, associate professor of emergency medicine at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. "We said, 'stay hom...

Double Lung Transplants Save Lives of Sickest COVID Patients

Two coronavirus patients who became so sick that double lung transplants were their only chance for survival are now recovering from their harrowing journeys, their doctors report.

Mayra Ramirez, 28, and Brian Kuhns, 62, are the first known COVID-19 cases in the United States where such a drastic procedure was tried, according to their doctors at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago.

...

11 States Could Face ICU Doc Shortages as Coronavirus Cases Surge

As COVID-19 infections surge across the United States, 11 states could find themselves with too few doctors to treat non-COVID patients in intensive care units, a new report finds.

Arizona and Texas already have a shortage of such doctors, the researchers added.

"This week's update shows that Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Oklahoma, Sou...

There May Be 6 Types of COVID-19

COVID-19 may not be just one disease, but six distinct types, a new British study claims.

Each type differs in severity and in the need for respiratory support during hospitalization, the researchers added.

Cough, fever and loss of smell are the usual symptoms of COVID-19, but the range of symptoms can include headaches, muscle pain, fatigue, diarrhea, confusion, loss of a...

COVID-19 Jitters Shouldn't Keep You From the Emergency Room

Fear of COVID-19 is keeping keep some people from getting medical help for critical conditions like stroke and heart attack, experts say.

In the first months of the pandemic, doctors at the Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center saw a 50% drop in the number of patients going to the emergency room for serious illnesses.

Although these numbers are starting to trend upw...

Early Dialysis Doesn't Improve Outcomes With Acute Kidney Failure

For critically ill patients with acute kidney injury, early dialysis doesn't reduce death any more than standard care does, new research finds.

"Studying a large number of patients from many countries across different hospital settings gives us a degree of confidence that taking a more conservative approach to treatment may be warranted," said researcher Martin Gallagher, program dir...

Pandemic Has Half of U.S. Hospitals Operating at a Loss: Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has America's hospitals on the fiscal ropes, with many facing financial ruin without continued aid from the federal government, a new report predicts.

Average hospital margins across the nation could sink to −7% in the second half of 2020 without further help, with half of all hospitals potentially operating in the red, the American Hospital Association...

Pandemic Has ER Docs Stressed Out and Weary: Survey

The coronavirus pandemic has left many U.S. emergency doctors with high levels of anxiety and emotional exhaustion, a new study finds.

The research included 426 emergency doctors (median age: 35) in seven cities in California, Louisiana and New Jersey who were surveyed during the early stages of the outbreak.

The doctors reported having moderate to severe anxiety at work and...

When a Nurse Becomes a COVID Patient: Her Tough Road Back

Nurse case manager Sharon Tapp recalls laying in a Bethesda, Md., hospital bed, feverishly ill from COVID-19, asking for a bedpan.

Then, in what seemed to be the very next moment, she found herself in another bed in an unfamiliar room at what seemed to be a different hospital, surrounded by people she didn't know.

"It was like, why am I here? I woke up and I was like, Johns ...

Black Kids Face Higher Odds of Post-Op Complications Than White Kids

When healthy kids have surgery, serious complications are uncommon. But even in that low-risk scenario, Black children fare worse, a new study finds.

Looking at more than 172,000 U.S. children who had inpatient surgery, researchers found that Black kids faced higher post-operative risks. That included more than three times the risk of dying within 30 days.

Experts stressed t...

Infusion of Certain Immune Cells May Help in Severe Coronavirus Cases

An infusion of cells that dampen the body's immune response might help people with severe cases of the new coronavirus recover more quickly, a new report suggests.

Two patients so sick with COVID-19 that they'd been put on a ventilator improved quickly when given an infusion of regulatory T-cells, which are cells that check the immune system and prevent it from overreacting to an infe...

Do COVID-19 Patients Really Have to Die Alone?

Hospitals have put in place strict no-visitation rules meant to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but these precautions have led to another heart-wrenching dilemma.

People are dying alone, gasping their last breath without any family or friends there to provide comfort.

Now, some experts are arguing this shouldn't be the case, and that hospitals need to come up with plans that...

Terrifying Delirium Can Strike Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients

Intense breathing problems may be the most widely reported feature of COVID-19, but new research warns that coronavirus can also take aim at the brain.

Infection can trigger serious nerve damage, stroke, inflammation and even wild bouts of delirium.

In fact, a bizarre array of delusions plagued nearly a quarter of the 43 British COVID patients whose cases are detailed in a n...

Many Cases of 'Penicillin Allergy' Might Be Mistaken

Penicillin allergy is often unconfirmed in hospital patients, meaning many unnecessarily receive other antibiotics that may be less effective and even harmful, a new study finds.

The researchers analyzed records of nearly 11,000 patients at 106 U.S. hospitals and found that 16% of those with a self-reported penicillin allergy were twice as likely to be prescribed alternative antib...

Hispanic Americans Being Hit Hard By COVID-19

COVID-19 is being diagnosed in Hispanic communities at a disproportionately high rate, a new study of the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., area shows.

Researchers found that among nearly 38,000 patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 at Johns Hopkins Health System, 16% were positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

That figure was much higher -- almost 43% -- among Hispanic pat...

Who's at Highest Risk From COVID-19? CDC Updates Its List

The list of conditions that put people at risk for severe COVID-19 illness has been expanded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It said that older adults and people with underlying medical conditions remain at increased risk for severe illness, but the agency further defined age- and health condition-related risks after a detailed review of available evidence.

...

Asthma Isn't a Risk Factor for Worsening COVID-19: Study

People with asthma can breathe a little easier: New research suggests the condition does not increase your risk of hospitalization due to COVID-19.

A review of records from 10 hospitals affiliated with Northwestern Medicine turned up more than 1,500 patients with COVID-19. Of these, 14% had asthma.

Using models that accounted for age, sex and ethnicity while adjusting ...

People Die When Hospital Bed Shortages Force Patients Out

When patients are pushed out of the hospital after hip surgery to make room for others, the odds of dying increase, according to a recent study from Norway.

When beds are in short supply, patients are forced out, researchers say. Fridays, the day before holidays and times when hospitals are overbooked are prime times for patients to be discharged, they report.

"Patients wh...