Get Healthy!

Results for search "Hospitals".

Health News Results - 224

In Israel, Widespread Vaccination Slashes Severe COVID Cases in Older Patients

FRIDAY, March 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Israel is among the first nations in the world to have a majority of its citizens vaccinated against the new coronavirus. That effort may be already paying off, with rates of severe COVID-19 cases declining by two-thirds among Israelis over the age of 69, a new report finds.

"These findings provide preliminary evidence of ...

Pandemic Is Hitting Hospitals Hard, Including Their Bottom Line

U.S. hospitals are expected to lose billions again in 2021, leaving them in dire financial shape as the COVID-19 pandemic guts the industry for a second year.

Hospitals could lose $53 billion to $122 billion in revenue in 2021, between 4% and 10% of their total revenue, according to an analysis prepared by consulting firm Kaufman Hall & Associates for the American Hospital Association.

Tiger Woods Hospitalized Following Car Crash

Golfing legend Tiger Woods is in the hospital after his car flipped over in a Los Angeles neighborhood on Tuesday morning.

"Tiger Woods was in a single-car accident this morning in California where he suffered multiple leg injuries. He is currently in surgery, and we thank you for your privacy and support," Woods' agent Mark Steinberg said in a statement, the Washington Post repo...

Heart Damage Seen in Many Hospitalized COVID Patients: Study

Heart damage was found in more than half of a group of hospitalized COVID-19 patients after they were discharged, according to a new British study.

The study included 148 patients who were treated for severe COVID-19 at six hospitals in London. The patients all had raised levels of a protein called troponin, which is released into the blood when the heart muscle is injured.

Many hos...

Give Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients Blood Thinners to Help Save Lives: Study

Giving blood thinners to COVID-19 patients soon after they're hospitalized could reduce their risk of dying.

That's the conclusion of a new study that analyzed data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs on nearly 4,300 patients, average age 68, who were hospitalized with COVID between March 1 and July 31.

Of those, more than 84% received blood thinners within 24 hours of admi...

ICU Bed Shortages Could Mean More COVID-19  Deaths

A lack of ICU beds and other resources was linked to a higher rate of deaths among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the early stages of the pandemic in the United States, researchers say.

The investigators analyzed data collected from more than 4,400 hospitals nationwide from March 1 to July 26, 2020, and found that fewer resources per COVID-19 patient -- including intensive care unit (I...

Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Being rushed into hospital care can be an emotional experience. So, what a surgeon says to trauma or emergency surgery patients plays a role in how satisfied they are after their operations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 187,000 patients discharged from 168 HCA Healthcare hospitals in the United States in 2018 and 2019. HCA Healthcare is a publicly traded compan...

Why Do Black Children Get Fewer Scans When They're Seen in ERs?

Black and Hispanic children who land in the emergency room are less likely than white kids to receive X-rays, CT scans and other imaging tests, a new study finds.

Looking at more than 13 million ER visits to U.S. children's hospitals, researchers found that white children underwent imaging tests one-third of the time.

That was true for only 26% of visits made by Hispanic children, a...

Strong Blood Thinners May Help COVID Patients, But Degree of Illness Is Key

Full doses of blood thinners can benefit patients hospitalized with COVID-19, but the severity of their illness matters, researchers say.

The new global analysis found that hospitalized patients with moderate COVID-19 may benefit from the drugs' clot-preventing powers, but patients with illness so severe it requires admission to an intensive care unit may not.

"SARS-CoV-2 infecti...

Study Casts Doubt on 'Early Warning' System for Kidney Patients

Electronic 'early warning systems' for kidney damage in hospital patients don't improve outcomes, researchers say.

These systems are meant to alert for acute kidney injury (AKI). AKI, a sudden decrease in the kidney's filtration function, occurs in 15% of hospital patients and increases the risk of death 10-fold.

The systems give an automated alert in the patient's electronic health...

Even When Cancer Is in Remission, Patients' Risks of Severe COVID Rise

Your cancer has gone into remission, so you breathe a sigh of relief as you try to navigate the coronavirus pandemic safely.

Not so fast, says new research that finds even cancer patients in remission still have a high risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19.

Previous studies have shown that cancer patients who have active disease or are hospitalized are at increased risk of ...

When ICUs Near Capacity, COVID Patients' Risk for Death Nearly Doubles

When intensive care units are swamped with COVID-19 patients, death rates may climb, a new study finds.

Looking at data from 88 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, researchers found a pattern: COVID-19 patients were nearly twice as likely to die during periods when ICUs were dealing with a surge of patients with the illness.

The results, experts said, do not necessar...

'Awareness' Under C-Section Anesthesia May Be Less Rare Than Thought

It's a woman's worst nightmare: You're having a C-section under anesthesia, but you suddenly become aware of what is happening during your surgery.

Now, a new study shows that phenomenon, known as "accidental awareness," is more common than believed. In fact, it may occur in 1 in 256 women who have obstetric surgery and some may suffer long-term psychological harm.

Accidental ...

Pandemic Is Tied to Big Rise in U.S. Heart Deaths

In a finding that highlights another health consequence of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers report that the risk of dying from heart disease increased during the coronavirus lockdowns last spring, likely because people were too scared to go to the hospital.

But the dangers of not seeking treatment for a medical emergency far outweigh that of catching COVID-19, especially now that pre...

Red Cross Issues Call for More Blood Plasma to Treat COVID Patients

The American Red Cross is urging COVID-19 survivors to donate blood plasma for hospital patients who need it to recover.

As an incentive to help boost the national convalescent plasma shortage, the Red Cross has teamed up with the National Football League and is offering donors a chance to win two tickets to next year's Super Bowl LVI in Los Angeles.

The Red Cross is especially aski...

U.S. COVID Hospitalizations Reach Record High as California Hospitals Run Out of Oxygen

A record-breaking 131,000 coronavirus hospitalizations were recorded in the United States on Tuesday. In hard-hit Los Angeles County, hospitals began running out of oxygen and paramedics were told not to bring patients to a hospital if they showed little hope of survival.

"We're no longer a wave or surge, or surge upon a surge. We really are in the middle of a viral tsunami," Robert Kim-...

Laughter As Medicine: Clowns Help Hospitalized Kids Cope

Send in the clowns. They could help hospitalized children cope with pain and anxiety.

New research shows that hospital clowns can help improve both physical symptoms and the psychological well-being of children and teens through laughter and play.

For the study, researchers from Brazil and Canada reviewed databases to find clinical trials on the subject of hospital clowns publish...

Why Do Obese People Have Higher Risk From COVID-19?

Respiratory problems and other factors -- not inflammation -- may explain why obese people are more likely to have severe COVID-19 and die from it, according to a new study.

Other studies have shown that overweight and obese COVID-19 patients are more likely to be admitted to intensive care, to require mechanical ventilation, and to die. Population-level studies also indicate that countri...

COVID Patient Survival Falls When Local Area Has Higher Caseload: Study

"Flattening the curve" could be key to reducing deaths among people hospitalized with COVID-19, a new study of U.S. hospitals suggests.

Researchers found that COVID-19 patients' survival odds depended not only on their age and overall health. It also depended on the hospital and the surrounding community.

At hospitals in counties where the infection was spreading quickly, death rate...

Trials Find Full-Dose Blood Thinners May Harm, Not Help, COVID Patients in ICU

Because COVID-19 is known to raise the odds for dangerous blood clots, blood thinners have quickly become part of routine care for many hospitalized patients.

But three clinical trials testing full doses of these drugs in COVID-19 patients have now paused recruitment of critically ill patients because the medications could end up doing more harm than good.

According to experts at t...

Hurricanes Leave Rise in Hospitalizations in Their Wake

Hospitals are swamped with older patients after hurricanes, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on hospitalizations for adults 65 and older in the month following eight of the United States' largest hurricanes in recent years.

In this age group, post-hurricane increases in hospitalizations for any reason ranged from 10% (Hurricane Irene, 2011) to 23% (Hurricane Sandy, 2012)...

First 10 Days After Hospital Discharge Especially Risky for COVID Survivors

Being discharged from the hospital following a serious bout of COVID-19 is far from a clean bill of health, new research warns, and the risk of rehospitalization or death peaks early.

In the study, more than one-quarter of such patients ended up back in the hospital or died in the weeks after discharge. The researchers tracked almost 2,200 U.S. veterans discharged at 132 VA hospitals thi...

Women Less Likely to Survive Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Women who are resuscitated from cardiac arrest are less likely to receive two common treatments once they arrive at the hospital, and are much more likely to die while hospitalized than men, a new study finds.

The researchers analyzed data gathered on nearly 4,900 resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in the United States and Canada from 2010 to 2015. Of those, just over 37...

COVID-19 Is Far More Lethal, Damaging Than Flu, Data Shows

COVID-19 is far more harmful and deadly than the seasonal flu, new studies confirm.

Researchers analyzed U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs data on more than 3,600 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between Feb. 1 and June 17 of this year, and more than 12,600 hospitalized with the flu between Jan. 1, 2017 and Dec. 31, 2019. The average age of patients in both groups was 69.

The d...

Sickle Cell Puts Black Patients at Higher Risk for Severe COVID

Sickle cell disease increases the risk of death or serious complications from COVID-19 infection, a pair of new studies suggests.

People with sickle cell disease -- a genetic blood disorder predominantly found in Black people -- are 6.2 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than the general Black population of the United States, one study found.

"Sickle cell disease patients should...

U.S. Hospitals Running Out of ICU Beds for COVID Patients

In a sign that the coronavirus pandemic is entering its most dire stage yet, new federal data shows that more than a third of Americans now live in areas where hospitals are critically short of intensive care beds.

Hospitals serving more than 100 million Americans had fewer than 15 percent of intensive care beds still available as of last week, a New York Times analysis of govern...

Pandemic Causing Dangerous Delays in Care When Appendicitis Strikes Kids

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, doctors became concerned that people were delaying needed medical care to avoid hospitals. Now a new study hints that some parents may have waited to get emergency treatment for their children's appendicitis.

Appendicitis is a painful inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch that extends from the colon, on the lower right side of the abdomen.

High Blood Sugar Ups COVID Risks, Even in Non-Diabetics

COVID-19 patients with abnormally high blood sugar are at increased risk for serious illness and death, even if they don't have diabetes, new research shows.

The study included more than 11,300 non-critically ill adults with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in Spain between March and the end of May 2020. Of those, 19% were previously diagnosed with diabetes.

In all, one in five patien...

CDC Director Warns of Dire Winter Ahead for COVID Hospitalizations, Deaths

The head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Wednesday that the coming winter months might be the darkest period yet in the coronavirus pandemic.

"I actually believe they're going to be the most difficult time in the public health history of this nation," CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield told the Chamber of Commerce Foundation on Wednesday morning, adding that ...

Many Hospitalized COVID Patients Will Need Longer-Term Care at Home

When COVID-19 patients go home from the hospital, their recovery is often far from over -- and many might benefit from home health care, a new study suggests.

At a time when U.S. COVID cases are surging and hospitals are running out of room, experts say home health care could serve a critical role by allowing some patients to have shorter hospital stays and be monitored at home.

But...

Should Cancer Survivors Be Prioritized for COVID Vaccine?

Cancer survivors have higher odds of dying from seasonal flu, suggesting they may also be at increased risk from COVID-19 and may need to be among the first in line for vaccination against both diseases.

Researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine analyzed medical data from more than 630,000 people in the United Kingdom between 1990 and 2014, including more than 10...

Preemie Babies End Up Hospitalized More as Kids

Children born prematurely have a higher risk of hospitalization later on than those born at full term, a new study says.

Health problems are common in premature babies, though the risk falls as they grow up. But researchers said it has been unclear when the risk begins to drop or how it's affected by a child's gestational age at birth.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1 mill...

Delirium May Be Only Sign of Severe COVID in Elderly: Study

Delirium is often the first symptom of COVID-19 to appear in older people, a new study finds.

They may have confusion with an altered level of consciousness, disorientation, inattention and other mental disturbances, but none of the other typical signs of the coronavirus infection, such as fever and cough, researchers say.

"COVID can operate through multiple ways to affect the ...

Another Study Casts Doubt on 'Convalescent Plasma' as COVID-19 Treatment

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, anecdotal reports suggested that infusing very sick patients with the blood plasma of people who'd survived the disease might help boost outcomes.

But study findings released Nov. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, along with disappointing results from prior trials, suggest that those initial hopes may have been unfounded.

The new stu...

More Kids Injured by Tiny Magnets After Sales Ban Was Lifted: Study

Small, powerful magnets in toys like Buckyballs building sets and jewelry kits are causing an alarming number of serious pediatric injuries in the United States, new research warns.

Analyzing national data, researchers found an 80% rise in these injuries to children from 2016 to 2019, following the repeal of a sales ban on the magnets by a federal court.

When these small rare e...

Blacks, Hispanics Account for More Than Half of COVID Deaths: Study

Black and Hispanic Americans accounted for more than half of all hospitalized COVID-19 patient deaths in the United States in the early stages of the pandemic, and the hospitals where they were treated may be a factor, researchers say.

For the study, the investigators analyzed data on nearly 7,900 COVID-19 patients admitted to 88 hospitals nationwide between Jan. 17 and July 22, 2020. Of ...

B 11/21 -- Which Kids With COVID Will Get Very Sick?

Scientists have identified symptoms that may predict the severity of COVID-19 in children.

According to the researchers, children with respiratory disease and those with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (a rare but serious condition linked with COVID-19) have the most severe illness.

"Much of the discussion to date around COVID-19 suggests that children don't typically suffer seri...

How Hospitals Can Cut Patients' Falls

A new toolkit to help reduce falls and fall-related injuries among hospital patients is highly effective, a new study shows.

Falls are the leading cause of preventable injury, so researchers set out to create a fall prevention toolkit for patients and their families.

It includes measures such as a laminated poster to display by patients' beds, and personalized prevention plans that ...

Pandemic Protocols Don't Stand in the Way of a Safe Delivery

New infection prevention practices started during the coronavirus pandemic have actually shortened hospital stays for mothers and their babies, a new study finds.

The changes included screening the temperature of all patients and visitors, limiting the number of visitors, providing staff with personal protective equipment, and new protocols for delivery management and newborn care.

...

Coronavirus Cases, Hospitalizations Keep Climbing

On the heels of days of staggering coronavirus case counts, more than 90,000 new infections were reported among Americans on Election Day.

All of the country's five highest days of new COVID-19 cases have been recorded since Oct. 29, confirming fears that another surge has taken hold and will only worsen, CNN reported.

The nationwide seven-day average of new cases now stand...

Hospitals Across America Strained by Coronavirus Surge

Hospitals across America were struggling on Tuesday as the new coronavirus struck with a vengeance in parts of the country that had been spared the worst in the early days of the pandemic.

The number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has climbed an estimated 46 percent in the past month, straining the capacity of regional health care systems to respond to overwhelming demand, The N...

Knowing What to Expect May Help After Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is common in America, with an attack occurring every 73 seconds. But having supportive care at the emergency department and afterwards can help heal the trauma, Penn State doctors say.

One in five women is raped during their lifetime, yet only 25% report it, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. The closer the relationship is between the vic...

Could Hospital Visit Records Help Docs Spot ADHD, Autism Early?

Kids with autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) go to the hospital more in their first year of life than children without these conditions, according to a new study.

These findings suggest that keeping track of hospital visits may be a new way to identify these conditions early and that might improve outcomes and lower health care costs, researchers say.

<...

Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms' Breastfeeding

One key to breastfeeding success? Having enough hospital nurses to ensure that new moms get top-notch care.

Hospitals with higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding had nurses who provided more consistent care, according to a new report.

That care included helping moms have skin-to-skin contact with their babies and breastfeed within an hour of giving birth. Nurses also provi...

'Weekend Effect' Affects Survival Odds for Rural Stroke Patients

Stroke patients have a higher risk of death if they're admitted to a rural hospital on the weekend, a new study finds.

University of Georgia researchers analyzed 2016 data on stroke deaths at U.S. hospitals to learn whether the so-called "weekend effect" influenced stroke outcomes.

"The weekend effect is the phenomenon where the risk of bad or adverse outcomes, such as morta...

Bedside COVID-19 Test Faster Than Standard PCR Test

Bedside tests for COVID-19 may speed results and improve infection control, making them better than standard laboratory tests, a new study suggests.

Results of the bedside test take about 2 hours, compared with 21 hours for PCR lab tests, the researchers said. These findings are from more than 1,000 British hospital patients tested with the QIAstat-Dx POCT test.

Reducing t...

Many Older Americans With Heart Failure Take 10 or More Meds

When older people hospitalized for heart failure are sent home, they are often given a whopping 10 medications to take for a variety of conditions. But is this "polypharmacy" practice necessary, or does it just place a bigger burden on already frail patients?

It's not a question so much of the quantity of the medications, but whether the medications patients are taking are the right ...

Blacks, Asians More Likely Than Whites to Have Severe COVID

Black and Asian COVID-19 patients are more likely than white patients to have severe illness, a new British study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1,800 adult COVID-19 patients admitted to King's College Hospital in London between March 1 and June 2.

Patients who were Black or of mixed ethnicity were three times more likely to be admitted to the hospital than ...

Kids' Hospitalizations Accompany Rising Unemployment Rates: Study

COVID-19 has led to widespread job loss in the United States. And now a new study reports that when unemployment rates rise, so do hospitalizations of children.

For the study, researchers analyzed 12 years of data (2002 to 2014) from 14 states. They found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there was a 2% increase in child hospitalizations for all causes, among them d...

Always Be Ready for a Trip to the ER

Accidents happen, and being prepared for an emergency room visit could help speed treatment and reduce anxiety if the need occurs, an expert says.

The first step is determining which ER you want to use in the event of a sudden or severe illness or injury, said Dr. Susan Promes, chair of emergency medicine at Penn State Health Medical Center.

"You'll want to know what's avail...