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Results for search "Sexually Transmitted Diseases: AIDS/HIV".

Health News Results - 67

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The future of medicine may be here: Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say they've developed an ingestible capsule that can be monitored outside the body for health data, using Bluetooth wireless technology.

The capsule could deliver drugs as well as sense the condition of its surroundings in the gut, including infecti...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young black gay men are 16 times more likely to have HIV than whites, even though they have fewer partners, have less unsafe sex, and get tested for HIV more often, a new study shows.

"Our study illuminates how HIV disparities emerge from complex social and sexual networks and inequalities in access to medical care for those who are HIV-posit...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time, a highly influential panel of experts says doctors should offer a daily pill to prevent HIV transmission to people who are at high risk for infection with the AIDS-causing virus.

This treatment is called pre-exposure prophylaxis -- PrEP for short -- and it has been shown to be highly effective at preventing HIV's spread, c...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When someone with HIV has the virus suppressed with medication, there is virtually no chance of passing it on to sex partners, a new review concludes.

The Public Health Agency of Canada pulled together studies from the last decade looking at the risk of HIV transmission among partners where one person is HIV-positive and one is not.

...

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental vaginal ring meant to prevent pregnancy and HIV looks safe, according to an early stage study.

The dual-purpose ring releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine and the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel, said researchers led by Dr. Sharon Achilles, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

"We are very e...

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Giving antiviral medications to gay men without HIV led to a 25 percent reduction in new infections of the AIDS-causing virus, a new study shows.

Researchers followed 3,700 gay men who were given what's known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) under a program in New South Wales, Australia. The regimen generally involves taking a daily pill. ...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of two HIV-fighting antibodies can suppress the virus in some patients, even after they stop standard drugs, a preliminary trial has shown.

Researchers found that among 11 HIV patients given the antibody combo, nine maintained complete suppression of the virus after going off their medication regimen. The benefit typically la...

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Improved treatment has nearly tripled viral suppression rates among HIV patients in the United States over the past two decades, researchers report.

But viral suppression rates remain lower among young people and black Americans, the researchers add.

About 1.2 million U.S. adults have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Achieving and ...

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is typically a manageable infection, but medications that keep the virus at bay don't work for everyone. Now, researchers have developed a new medication to help them.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug -- ibalizumab (Trogarzo) -- in March. Phase 3 trial results were published in the Aug...

MONDAY, July 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People with HIV are twice as likely to develop heart disease than those without the AIDS-causing virus, British researchers report.

Their review of studies from 153 countries also found that HIV-associated heart disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years, as more people with HIV live longer.

More than two-thirds of HIV-associ...

FRIDAY, July 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental HIV vaccine was safe and triggered strong immune responses in healthy adults and in monkeys, researchers report.

They say it also protected two-thirds of monkeys against an HIV-like virus.

Though results of animal studies are not always the same in humans, researchers are encouraged by this early-stage study, which inc...

THURSDAY, July 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney disease is a "hidden epidemic" affecting more than 850 million people worldwide, renal experts say.

That's twice the number of diabetics (422 million) and more than 20 times the number of people with cancer (42 million) or HIV/AIDS (36.7 million).

But most people don't realize that kidney disease is a major health issue.

...

THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Today's teens are a much tamer lot, a new U.S. government survey finds.

Fewer high school students are turning to sex or drugs, with the 2017 rates the lowest reported since the survey began in 1991, said researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"The health of our youth reflects the nation's well-being,...

MONDAY, June 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term antiviral treatment cuts the risk of cancer in HIV patients as they age, a new study says.

People with HIV are at increased risk for both AIDS-related cancers (Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma or invasive cervical cancer) and non-AIDS-related cancers (lung and larynx cancer, melanoma and leukemia).

Antiretroviral therap...

WEDNESDAY, June 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental HIV vaccine protected animals from dozens of strains of HIV. And a human trial of the vaccine is expected to begin in the second half of 2019, according to U.S. researchers.

The vaccine targets a vulnerable site on HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- and triggered antibody production in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys, accordi...

FRIDAY, May 18, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- People with HIV are more likely than people without the virus to have high blood pressure, in part because of treatments and repercussions of the condition itself, a new review of research shows.

Learning more about the underlying mechanisms of high blood pressure in people with HIV is critical in preventing one of the leading cond...

FRIDAY, May 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In 2013, there was just one clean-needle program in all of West Virginia, Kentucky and North Carolina, and the latter two states had laws banning such programs.

Fast-forward four years: All of those laws have now been overturned and the number of "syringe services programs" available to help addicts has risen to over 50 across the three states,...

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs to prevent HIV-positive pregnant women from infecting their unborn babies appear safe and don't raise the risk for premature birth or infant death, new research indicates.

The U.S. scientists said their findings should ease worries among expectant mothers treated with antiviral regimens that contain the drug tenofovir disoproxil fum...

TUESDAY, April 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) teens feel uneasy and uninformed when it comes to talking to them about sex and dating, a new study shows.

The study included 44 parents of LGBT teens between the ages of 13 and 17. The parents cited many challenges in trying to educate their teens about sex, including general dis...

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Though fewer Americans are now dying from infectious diseases, great disparities persist across the country, a new study finds.

Between 1980 and 2014, just over 4 million Americans died from infectious diseases. But while overall infectious disease deaths have dropped almost 19 percent, death rates differed widely by county. A number of fact...

MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental saliva-based HIV test shows promise, researchers report.

The new test may be able to detect early evidence of HIV antibodies in saliva as reliably as a blood test, according to the scientists who developed it.

The antibodies are produced by the immune system to fight HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

"The ea...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. government program to prevent, treat and care for people with HIV/AIDS in poor countries has been highly effective and should continue, experts say.

Since 2003, the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has provided drug therapy to more than 13 million men, women and children, as well as voluntary circumcisions to more ...

TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Goodbye, daily HIV meds?

Researchers say a once-a-week, slow-release pill may keep HIV infections under control and help prevent new HIV infections altogether.

The pill in question is still early in development. But it contains the same highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) -- the drug combination that revolutionized HIV trea...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Gene therapy may have the potential to eradicate HIV in people infected with the virus, new animal research suggests.

The science centers around the use of "chimeric antigen receptor" (CAR) genes. In laboratory work with monkeys, these engineered cells have destroyed HIV-infected cells for more than two years, scientists reported.

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Drug use, mental distress and exposure to violence in the teen years appears to raise the odds for later HIV infection, a new study suggests.

Teens who engage in risky behaviors are more likely to have unsafe sex -- and that may put them at increased risk for HIV, the AIDS-causing virus, University of Michigan researchers reported.

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a case that investigators say is a first, a lung cancer drug unmasked and then attacked the kind of HIV-infected cells that standard antiretroviral therapy has been unable to touch.

The finding was reported on Dec. 1, which is also World AIDS Day, in the Annals of Oncology.

While one AIDS expert said the findings were promis...

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new study warns of a potential return to the "bad old days" when there were no effective drugs to fight HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Timed for release on Dec. 1, World AIDS Day, the new study looked at data on more than 56,000 adults living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America.

In total, patients in 63 low- an...

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A program that includes male circumcision and antiviral drug treatment led to a sharp drop in HIV infection rates in a high-risk region of Uganda, researchers report.

Their study of a U.S.-funded HIV prevention program in the rural Rakai District on the shore of Lake Victoria followed 34,000 people. The program provides a number of free serv...

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health care providers are getting better at detecting new cases of HIV infection, although it still can take years for people to know they've acquired the dreaded virus, federal officials reported Tuesday.

The average time between HIV infection and diagnosis was three years in 2015, seven months earlier than it had been in 2011, accordin...

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Using marijuana when you have HIV could lead to problems with brain function if you also abuse alcohol or drugs, a new study finds.

"People with HIV infection have many reasons to have cognitive dysfunction, from the virus itself to medications for HIV infection and related conditions, particularly as they age," said lead researcher Richard Sa...

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people with HIV who take life-saving antiretroviral medications has increased by tens of millions worldwide in recent decades, a United Nations report says.

The number rose from 685,000 in 2000 to 20.9 million as of June 2017, according to UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV and AIDS.

"Many people do not re...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The advent of powerful drugs in the mid-1990s brought remarkable gains in survival for HIV patients who had access to the medications.

But a team of experts now warns that the global HIV pandemic continues and is at risk of expanding, given the worrisome global rise of HIV resistance to antiretroviral (ART) medications.

"Cu...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A combination antibody strategy could be the key to halting the spread of HIV, according to results from two promising animal studies.

Two separate research groups completely protected their own sets of lab monkeys from HIV infection using this combination vaccination strategy, albeit in two very different ways.

One group inocula...

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- HIV patients who take their medication but also smoke are about 10 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS-related causes, a new study estimates.

Lifesaving antiretroviral drugs have improved life expectancy to the point that patients now have more to fear from tobacco than HIV, said lead researcher Dr. Krishna Reddy.

...

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The start of college means it's time for young women to take charge of their health.

Dr. Aparna Sridhar, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, Los Angeles, offers several tips in a university news release.

Know your health status. Talk to your parents and your doctor to make sur...

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A group of gay and bisexual teenage males safely used a medication that prevents HIV infection, though some failed to follow the drug regimen fully and became infected, researchers report.

People at risk for becoming infected with the virus that causes AIDS can dramatically lower their risk of infection by taking the drug Truvada in what is k...

THURSDAY, Aug. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Condoms can help prevent pregnancy and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), but only about a third of Americans use them, a new federal report shows.

"The use of condoms is a public health issue," said report author Casey Copen, a statistician at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health ...

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- HIV treatment prevented transmission of the virus in gay couples when only one partner had the virus, a new study shows.

The research included 358 such gay couples in Australia, Brazil and Thailand. The HIV-positive partners received treatment that reduced the amount of virus in the blood to undetectable levels.

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time, bacteria that live under the foreskin of uncircumcised straight men have been linked to a rise in the risk for contracting HIV, new research indicates.

Researchers found four specific types of bacteria tied to a higher risk of the AIDS-causing virus. These bacteria are part of the microbiome -- a collection of microorganis...

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a shot of medication to control HIV every month or two instead of having to take pills every day could transform the way the virus is kept at bay.

New research suggests that injectable, long-acting antiretroviral therapy for HIV is as safe and effective as oral medications. The injection -- given every four or eight weeks -- includes t...

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cows already give us milk, meat and leather. Now, researchers say they may also hold the key to an AIDS vaccine.

Scientists found it took cows just a few weeks to develop powerful antibodies against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

This suggests they could move from the farm to the laboratory and play an important role in testing ex...

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- AIDS-related deaths worldwide have been halved since 2005 as more people were able to get lifesaving drugs, UNAIDS (a United Nations Program) says in a new report.

In 2016, 19.5 million (53 percent) of the almost 37 million people living with HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) had access to HIV treatment. AIDS-related deaths fell from 1.9 mill...

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sex is everywhere in the media, and so you may be convinced that today's teens are always looking to "hook-up." But new federal research says it's just not so.

Instead, the study found that most teenagers in high school aren't sexually active.

"The myth is that every kid in high school is having sex, and it's not true," noted Dr. C...

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There are mixed results from a new study on the use of monetary rewards to help boost the odds that HIV-infected patients will enter care, and take their meds as directed.

The study, conducted at HIV clinics in New York City and Washington, D.C., found that financial incentives such as gift cards could improve the likelihood that HIV patien...

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans with HIV are sticking with medications that turn a fatal disease into a manageable condition, a new study shows.

"This represents a lot of people who are not dying and not infecting others," said study corresponding author Ira Wilson, chair of Brown University's Health Services Policy and Practice Department, in Providence, R...

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Soon after actor Charlie Sheen revealed his HIV-positive status back in late 2015, rates of at-home testing for the virus shot up to record levels, a new report shows.

The study follows on 2016 research that found the the Internet was abuzz with millions more searches for HIV-related topics after the former "Two and a Half Men" star made the ...

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Could the United States be turning the corner on the AIDS epidemic?

New research suggests it's possible.

If certain targets are met, the rate of new infections may be down to 12,000 a year by 2025, which would mark a transition toward the end of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the researchers said.

"Achieving these targets will r...

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with HIV who get treatment are living longer in North America and Europe, a new study finds.

In fact, a 20-year-old with HIV who began antiretroviral treatment in 2008 or later and had a low viral load after a year of treatment has a life expectancy that's close to that of the general population -- around 78 years old, the study...

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As HIV becomes a lifetime disease instead of a killer, researchers say these patients will likely start to mirror other Americans when it comes to the kinds of cancers they develop.

By 2030, the total number of cancers in HIV-positive people is expected to decline dramatically, as fewer patients develop tumors linked to a ravaged immune sys...

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with schizophrenia may face an increased risk for serious infections, a new study suggests.

"The preliminary data results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia have higher prevalence of all types of severe infections compared to the background population," study author Monika Pankiewicz-Dulacz, from the University of Southern Denm...

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Wellness Library Results - 9

For all of the progress made against HIV/AIDS over the years, the push for still better treatments is far from over. Until a cure is discovered, doctors and researchers will continue to look for new and more effective ways to control the disease and save lives. While HIV medications can attack the virus and keep the disease in check for several years or more, the side effects can be severe, the me...

If you think you might have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), the virus that causes AIDS, you need to find out for sure. Fortunately, there's a quick, reliable, and completely confidential way to know whether or not you carry the virus. You don't have to schedule a doctor's appointment or get a referral from a clinic. You don't even have to leave your house. You can buy a Home Access HIV-1 Test...

Among chronic diseases, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) poses challenges to those struck with it that others can barely imagine, says Cheryl Gore-Felton, PhD, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Not only is HIV incurable and life-threatening, she says, it's one of the few chronic diseases that can make a person feel shunned...

Getting infected with HIV -- the human immunodeficiency virus -- is a life-changing event. With access to treatment, that's life-changing -- not life-ending. If you get the right treatment and take care of yourself, you can look forward to years or even decades of good living. As recently as the late 1980s, infection with HIV usually meant an early death. Within a few years or even a few months o...

It may come as a surprise to know that of the roughly 11 million Mexican-born migrant workers currently living in the United States, recent immigrants -- though poorer -- are healthier in several ways than the average American. But the longer they "acculturate" here, the worse their health gets. For migrant workers who have a chronic disease, this is a particular problem. Not only are they unlikel...

What is AIDS? It's a relatively new disease that first surfaced in 1981, when scientists discovered a previously unknown human retrovirus linked to the outbreak of a rare skin cancer among gay men. Researchers named the virus the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and called the disease it caused AIDS -- short for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Today AIDS is the fifth leading cause of death ...

There are only two ways to completely protect yourself from a sexually transmitted disease. You can abstain from sex altogether or have sex only with a partner you know to be uninfected. Condoms and other barrier protection can greatly reduce the risk of most sexually transmitted diseases, but even these are not 100 percent effective. It goes without saying that few people choose the first option...

In the early years of the epidemic in the United States, AIDS seemed exclusively like a gay men's disease. In the early 1980s, when the disease first appeared, intravenous drug users and men who had sex with men were the primary sufferers. During that time, as many as 3,000 people a week became infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Most who were getting sick and dying were gay men; they w...

To date, thousands of children living in the United States today -- and millions of children around the world -- got HIV from their mothers before, during, or shortly after birth. But thanks to aggressive treatments for pregnant women, the number of new cases of childhood AIDS in this country has declined. Children who already have HIV need extensive medical care, including medications to attack t...

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