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Results for search "Behavior".

11 May

Will The COVID-19 Lockdown Lead To A New Baby Boom?

Fears over potential pregnancy problems and the recession may postpone family planning, new study finds.

30 Mar

6 Tips For Stopping Coronavirus Scammers

Important ways to protect your health and money.

Health News Results - 385

As the coronavirus pandemic wears on, it's clear that not everyone's on the same page when it comes to preventing the risk of infection.

Lots of people wear masks, try to maintain social distancing and avoid large gatherings. But plenty of others forgo a mask or wear it on their chin, go to busy bars and attend social gatherings, like weddings.

Both sides think they're righ...

Current wisdom holds that white kids are at greater risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than Black children are, but a new analysis finds the opposite is true.

In a review of 21 previously published U.S. studies, which included nearly 155,000 Black children in the United States, researchers found that 14.5% of these children had ADHD. That's much higher than t...

If you have experienced a heart attack and you have an adversarial personality, new research suggests you might want to consider an attitude adjustment.

An angry outlook may make you vulnerable to a second heart attack, the new study found.

The study included more than 2,300 heart attack survivors, average age 67, who were followed for 24 months. Men accounted for 68% of...

The number of Americans using electronic cigarettes is soaring, especially among youth, a new study finds.

Nearly 14 million U.S. adults vaped in 2018, up from just over 11 million adults in 2016. The increase was seen in all socioeconomic groups, the researchers found.

"An increasing number of individuals are using e-cigarettes, especially in the younger age groups, which...

To get a handle on your eating habits, keep a close eye on the clock, researchers suggest.

Consuming most of your daily calories in the evening is associated with a less nutritious diet and higher calorie intake, a new study shows.

Unfortunately, hunger pangs are often strongest later in the day. And this pattern could influence both the type and amount of food we eat, the s...

Being a selfish jerk won't pave a path to success, new research suggests.

The study involved hundreds of participants who completed personality assessments when they were undergraduates or MBA students at three universities.

The researchers checked in with the same people about 14 years later to find out how well they'd done in their careers, and their co-workers were asked ...

Americans are generally well-versed about the use of masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19, although knowledge gaps about face coverings persist, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll reveals.

About nine in 10 Americans said they are knowledgeable about mask-wearing and that they sometimes, often or always wear a mask when they leave their home and are unable to social distance, the online po...

The coronavirus pandemic has brought significant challenges for people with eating disorders, a new study finds.

During the early stages of the pandemic lockdown in the United Kingdom, researchers at Northumbria University in Newcastle surveyed people who currently had an eating disorder or were recovering from one.

In all, 87% of the survey respondents said their sympto...

Disagreements between parents and grandparents over parenting choices like discipline, meals and TV time can strain family relationships, a new poll finds.

When kids stay with grandparents, relaxed rules can cause friction with the child's parents, child health experts noted.

According to the poll, nearly 50% of parents said they have disagreements with one or more gra...

New York City residents are more likely to shop in stores where social distancing is practiced than where it is ignored, a new study finds.

"We want to understand how people are making decisions based on compliance with the health guidelines," said Ricardo Daziano, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y.

"Until a vac...

Yoga may help people soothe frayed nerves during the coronavirus pandemic, but the ancient practice may also help those with more serious, chronic forms of anxiety, new research suggests.

The study compared yoga, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and stress management for treating people with generalized anxiety disorder. While cognitive behavioral therapy remains the preferred firs...

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't acknowledge them, a new study shows.

When faced with a poor outcome due to their decisions, most people ask, "What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?" But a narcissist says, "No one could have seen this coming," according to Oregon State University (OSU)-Cascades researchers.

Narcissists also b...

American kids have something to celebrate: Spanking has hit a new low.

About one in three parents said they spanked their kids in 2017 compared to 50% in 1993, new research shows.

"Fewer parents are spanking, and I think it's helpful for people to know that and that there are tools that are more effective than spanking," said Christopher Mehus, lead author of a new stu...

You might say this is a tale about sheer pig-headedness.

Hungarian researchers wondered how two popular family pets -- dogs and miniature pigs -- would compare when confronted with a problem to solve.

Turns out pigs are more likely than dogs to find a solution on their own, while dogs are more apt to seek out human help.

Miniature versions of the domestic pig ar...

In the midst of a pandemic, many Americans still view face mask mandates as an assault on their personal freedoms, rather than a means of protecting themselves and others from COVID-19.

But a group of researchers out of Duke University say the mask backlash can be turned around -- as long as efforts to do so are grounded in empathy, not judgment.

As coronavirus cases in the...

Nearly half of U.S. teens have been stalked or harassed by a partner or done the deed themselves, a new study finds.

"These victimization and perpetration numbers are unacceptably high," said study author Emily Rothman, a professor of community health sciences at Boston University's School of Public Health.

"Unfortunately, they are in line with estimates of similar problems ...

Age-based job demotions, forced retirements and other overt examples of age discrimination can be harmful to older adults.

But what about more subtle forms of ageism -- like jokes about "senior moments," or assuming an older person can't use technology, or the constant barrage of anti-wrinkle ads in the media?

A new poll finds that most older adults encounter at least one f...

For New York lawyer Roseann Schuyler, her family's pets -- a dog (Jackie), two cats (Hudson and Winter) and a fish (Atticus fish) -- eased the long, lonely days of lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic this spring.

"Those early days were so surreal. There was not a lot to do other than to sit in the house and worry," Schuyler said. "The fact that we had pets -- Jackie in particular...

With several potential COVID-19 vaccines now in clinical trials, U.S. policymakers need to plan for the next hurdle: Ensuring Americans actually get vaccinated.

That's according to a new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. It lays out recommendations for winning the public's trust of any future vaccine, and helping them access it as easily as possible.

...

Many more American workers caring for children, the sick or aged, as well as bus drivers, subway workers and those involved in food production took time off work in April -- probably due to fears of contracting COVID-19, a new government report finds.

In an analysis of federal employment data on work absenteeism from October 2019 until the end of April 2020, researchers found that abs...

Americans began to travel less before states started to issue stay-at-home orders, and that may have curbed coronavirus case numbers, a new study suggests.

"Our results strongly support the conclusion that social distancing played a crucial role in the reduction of case growth rates in multiple U.S. counties during March and April, and is therefore an effe...

For those who try to catch up on lost sleep during the weekend, French researchers have some bad news: Once Saturday and Sunday have come and gone, many will find they're still seriously short on sleep.

The finding centered on adults who regularly get only six hours of sleep or less on weekdays. That's far less than the seven to eight hours per night that most people need, said study ...

It was a silent spring.

For long weeks, Americans stayed at home, away from work or school, hoping to curb transmission of the new coronavirus and build capacity at stressed hospitals.

Now, as summer begins, the nation is "reopening" -- but in many states, coronavirus cases are surging once again. For those states and their inhabitants, was it all too soon?

"Can th...

Both cyberbullies and their victims can suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new British study finds.

Cyberbullying is bullying online rather than in person. It's so pervasive that pediatricians should routinely ask their patients about it as part of psychological assessment, the researchers said.

"Parents, teachers a...

Poverty and crowded living conditions increase the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, a new study suggests.

Researchers reached that conclusion after testing nearly 400 women who gave birth at two hospitals in New York City during the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak.

"Our study shows that neighborhood socioeconomic status and household crowding are strongly assoc...

Not getting enough sleep can kill your mood the morning after, Norwegian researchers report.

"Not in the sense that we have more negative feelings, like being down or depressed," said lead author Ingvild Saksvik-Lehouillier of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. "But participants in our study experienced a flattening of emotions when they slept less than ...

Since the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, experts have worried that social distancing and stay-at-home orders would lead to a surge in loneliness. But a new U.S. study suggests it has not played out that way.

In a national survey, researchers found that one month into state lockdowns, Americans were no more likely to feel isolated and lonely than they were pre-COVID-19. In fac...

Ouch! Many of us swear when we get hurt, and a new study shows it actually does help.

Turns out that swearing can significantly increase your pain tolerance -- but only if you use real swear words, and not G-rated versions that mimic them, British researchers report.

For the study, 92 volunteers held their hands in an ice bath. To assess their pain threshold, researc...

It's often said that physical activity rates are too low, but a new report takes a different angle and reveals the good news that exercise prevents nearly 4 million premature deaths a year worldwide.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from 168 countries on the percentage of people who were getting recommended levels of exercise. The World Health Organization recommends at ...

If you're working from home because of the coronavirus pandemic and expect to keep doing so, you need to be sure your work station is set up properly, an orthopedic specialist says.

You also need to take regular breaks to move around, according to Terrence McGee, a physical therapist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

In an office, many people have ...

A ruptured appendix is one medical emergency that a general surgeon colleague of Dr. Jacqueline Fincher hadn't treated for more than 15 years in their small town of Thomson, Ga.

That's because the signs and symptoms of appendicitis are so well-known that nearly everyone gets to the hospital well before an inflamed appendix has a chance to burst.

B...

Children of mothers with long-term depression have an increased risk of behavioral problems and poor development, researchers say.

The new study included nearly 900 Australian mothers and 978 of their children. Levels of depression were examined in the mothers before, during and after pregnancy. The investigators also analyzed their children's development and behavior.

One i...

Back off, Mom and Dad: Teens who feel their parents are overly controlling may have more difficulty with romantic relationships as adults, a new study suggests.

The study, which followed 184 teens, found that those with domineering parents had a future that was different from their peers: On average, they did not go as far in their education, and they were less likely to be in a roman...

Sex, and lots of it, has long been the primary preoccupation of young adults, but more of them are now going months and years without any intimate encounters.

New research shows that one of three men between the ages of 18 to 24 have not had any sex during the past year, putting to rest all the talk of the "hookup culture."

Men and women aged 25 to 34 in the United States al...

The grosser someone sounds when they cough or sneeze, the more likely you are to suspect they have a contagious infection -- even if it's not true.

That's the upshot of a new study in which participants were asked to judge whether people were -- or weren't -- infected with a communicable disease by the sound of their coughs and sneezes.

On average, they guessed about four ou...

Therapy designed to address mental health issues may also tamp down chronic inflammation, a new review suggests.

In so doing, interventions like behavioral therapy may help to rein in not only anxiety, depression and stress, but also the risk of developing heart disease or cancer, researchers say.

The finding is based on a look at 56 studies that collectively involved more ...

Very sensitive people may owe about half of their heightened feelings to their genes, a British study of twins suggests.

Researchers looked at pairs of identical and fraternal 17-year-old twins to gauge how much differences in sensitivity owed to genes or the environment.

While identical twins share the same genes, fraternal twins don't, so findings among identical twins a...

The latest cancer prevention guidelines may change your typical backyard barbecue: Gone are the hot dogs and booze. In are veggie kebobs and maybe a swim or some badminton.

The American Cancer Society's new cancer prevention recommendations suggest, among other things, adding more physical activity to your days. About 20 minutes a day is the minimum, but 40 minutes or more daily is ...

Video games often stand in the way of exercise and healthy eating among male college students, a new study shows.

"It's important to understand that video games are a risk factor for poor lifestyle habits that may contribute to poor health," said researcher Dustin Moore, a graduate student at the University of New Hampshire.

"We know that habits developed in adolescence a...

A wristband that zaps a key nerve may help quell the uncontrollable tics of Tourette syndrome, according to British researchers.

"We think we've come up with a safe and effective piece of technology that we believe is relatively cheap that will give control over tics to people with Tourette syndrome," said lead researcher Stephen Jackson, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the ...

Handgun owners are at substantially heightened risk of suicide in the years after buying their first gun, a large new study finds.

The study of more than 26 million California residents found that first-time handgun owners were nearly four times more likely to die by suicide in the coming years versus non-owners.

Their risk of suicide by firearm, specifically, rose to a stri...

Lassie desperately trying to get Timmy out of the well isn't a myth -- your dog really wants to save you, a new study suggests.

"It's a pervasive legend," said researcher Joshua Van Bourg, a graduate student in psychology at Arizona State University in Tempe. "The difficult challenge is figuring out why they do it."

To tease out an answer, Van Bourg's team tried an ...

As if the childhood obesity epidemic isn't bad enough, new research warns that over one million more American boys and girls stand to become obese if coronavirus-related school closures continue through the end of the year.

The culprit: a steep rise in sedentary behavior following the spring shutdown of school and afterschool sports and activities across all 50 states.

"If s...

Fatter wallets lead to fatter people, according to a new study.

Researchers examined the link between nations' wealth and their obesity rates. They discovered citizens get plumper as their country gets richer.

"As most people currently live in low- and middle-income countries with rising incomes, our findings underscore the urgent need for effective policies to break -- or a...

When bike-sharing services open in cities, more people start to commute by bicycle and take public transit, new research shows.

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, bike commuting had increased by 20% in cities where bike-share systems were introduced, according to study author Dafeng Xu, assistant professor of public policy and governance at the University of Washington in Seattle.

When kids and teens chafe under COVID-19 quarantine, how can parents stop the meltdowns and misbehavior?

Start with understanding: Young people miss their friends and their freedom. Younger kids might respond by throwing tantrums. Teens might isolate themselves, ignore social distancing rules or sneak out to see friends.

To curb negative behavior, experts from Penn State Childre...

People with physically demanding jobs take more sick leave. They also have higher unemployment rates and shorter work lives, a new Danish study finds.

"This study showed that high physical work demands are a marked risk factor for a shortened expected working life and increased years of sickness absence and unemployment," study co-author Lars Andersen and colleagues wrote. Andersen is...

Grief is touching the lives of countless Americans as the COVID-19 death toll mounts.

The death of a family member or close friend can be among the most difficult things you'll have to deal with, so the American Psychological Association outlines ways of coping with that loss -- whether or not it is coronavirus-related.

Talking about the death with friends or others can help...

Autism may be a risk factor for eating disorders, a new study suggests.

Previous research has shown that 20% to 30% of adults with eating disorders have autism, and the same is true for between 3% and 10% of children and teens. But it wasn't clear if autism developed before eating disorders or vice versa.

To find out, researchers assessed autism traits in nea...

In a finding that illustrates how distracted driving laws are saving lives, researchers report that car crash deaths among teens plunged by one-third during a period when the number of U.S. states with such laws on the books tripled.

"We found that states which had primary enforced distracted driving laws had lower fatal crashes involving 16- to 19-year-old drivers and passengers," sa...

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