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Health News Results - 18

People who get enough vitamin A, D and E may be less likely to complain of coughs and sore throat, though it's not clear the nutrients are the reason why, new research suggests.

The study, of over 6,100 U.K. adults, found that those who consumed more of the vitamins were less likely to have "respiratory complaints" -- like coughs, "chest" infections, trouble breathing and sore throat.

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The common cold can make you miserable, but it might also help protect you against COVID-19, a new study suggests.

The researchers added that people who've had COVID-19 may be immune to it for a long time, possibly even the rest of their lives.

The research focused on memory B cells, long-lasting immune cells that detect pathogens, produce antibodies to destroy them, and rem...

COVID-19 is unlike other respiratory viruses known to humans, but in time it could evolve into a seasonal scourge like the flu.

That's according to a new report in which researchers lay out the case for a possible seasonal COVID.

The scenario depends on many unknowns, and assumes the new coronavirus will bend to weather factors. And that would not happen until enough people ...

There may be no cure for the common cold, but a spoonful of honey might make it less miserable, a new research review concludes.

Parents have long used honey to soothe kids' sore throats and cough -- probably because their parents did. But the review of 14 clinical trials finds some science to back it up.

Overall, adults and kids given honey had less-severe, less-frequent co...

Since the pandemic began, it's been known that the severity of coronavirus illness varies widely between people. Could the common cold be the reason why?

It's still just a theory, but researchers in California suspect that if you've recently had a cold -- many of which are also caused by coronaviruses -- your immune system's T-cells might recognize SARS-CoV-2 and help fight it.

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It might be the last thing you want to do when you are battling a cold, but exercise might actually make you feel better, suggests one health expert.

Here's why: Physical activity boosts your heart rate and promotes healthy blood flow, and it also opens up your lungs and releases endorphins, said Dr. Jayson Loeffert, a sports medicine physician at Penn State Health in Hershey, Pa.

If you already have a cold, you're less likely to get the flu, and vice versa, a large new study shows.

That finding could lead to improved prediction of cold and flu outbreaks as well as new ways to control the diseases' spread, British researchers said.

While this interaction between colds and the flu has been observed, this is the first study large enough to provide stron...

Many U.S. doctors are much less likely to recommend cough and cold medicines for young children ever since experts advised against it in 2008, new research shows.

That's the good news. The bad news?

Physicians are still more likely to recommend antihistamines for children under age 12 with colds, despite the fact that they provide little known benefit, the researchers from R...

No parent wants to see their child catch a cold, but some take prevention measures that have little basis in science, a new survey shows.

For example, 51 percent of parents said they give their child an over-the-counter vitamin or supplement to prevent colds, even though there's no evidence they work.

Seventy-one percent of parents said they used "folklore" advice, such as n...

Flu has so far infected more than 6 million Americans this season, and winter colds are making their rounds. If you've been hit by either, you may be thinking about heading to your local pharmacy to relieve your aches, pains and congestion.

But before you do, you need to consider how some over-the-counter cold medicines may impact your heart.

"People with uncontrolled high...

Nearly 25 percent of antibiotics prescribed in the United States are given for conditions they aren't meant to treat, a new study finds.

Antibiotics are miracle drugs that can cure deadly bacterial infections. But too often they are given to treat viral infections, such as colds and flu, for which they are ineffective.

And the overuse of antibiotics brings public health da...

How highly you rate your health could predict how likely you are to catch a cold -- and, even more important, how healthy you'll be in later years.

Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh asked 360 healthy adults to rate their health as excellent, very good, good, fair or poor -- and then exposed them to a virus that causes the common cold.

Overall, about one-...

Many people rely on chicken noodle soup to soothe a cold, but few know exactly why the warm broth brings relief.

But one dietitian can explain its magic.

"Studies have shown that a hearty bowl of chicken noodle soup may help clear nasal congestion and ease cold symptoms," said Sandy Allonen, a clinical dietitian at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. "It's all ab...

When a baby starts sniffling and sneezing, the type of bacteria in their nose may predict how long the cold will last, a new study finds.

Babies with a wide variety of bacteria in the nose recover faster from their first cold than those with less variety, the researchers said.

"It's well known that different types of bacteria live in our gut. The respiratory tract is also ho...

New Jersey health officials on Wednesday confirmed the deaths of seven children following infection with an adenovirus -- a member of the same viral family that causes the common cold.

Eleven other children are infected, and all cases occurred at the same health care facility, the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, according to N.J. Commissioner of Health Dr. Sh...

School is in full swing, and with it comes a plethora of colds passed back and forth among kids.

But parents who want to alleviate a sick child's misery would do best to avoid over-the-counter cough and cold remedies.

Decongestants should not be given to children younger than 6 because there's no evidence that they do any good, according to a new review published online Oct....

Every now and then you might not feel well enough to exercise and decide to skip a workout. But if you have a cold that could last a full week, you probably won't want to find yourself facing a fitness setback once you've recovered.

Here's how to stay in the game.

The general guideline is that you should be able to work out if your symptoms are from the neck up, like a stuff...

For people suffering from a cold, the severity of their symptoms may be linked to the mix of bacteria that inhabit their nose.

New research suggests the amount and type of organisms residing in the nose might explain why some people's symptoms are worse than others -- even if they are infected with the same strain of virus.

For the study, researchers analyzed the nasal bacte...