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People living with someone who has COVID-19 appear to get powerful protection against infection when they are given Regeneron's antibody cocktail, a new study shows.

The findings suggest that beyond preventing the worst outcomes for coronavirus infection when given early enough, the cocktail could also prevent people from getting sick in the first place, the company said Monday.

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Once you've landed that coveted coronavirus vaccine appointment, you'll likely have to fill out a form on your medical history and whether you're allergic to any of the vaccine's ingredients. But there could be another question waiting for you: Have you ever had dermal filler injections?

That's because -- in rare cases -- people who've had the face-plumping injections can develop a mild, ...

People with cancers of the blood, bone marrow or lymph nodes are at an increased risk of not making protective coronavirus antibodies after COVID-19 vaccination, a new study warns.

The risk is particularly high for those with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The researchers urged these patients and those who interact with them to get vaccinated but to keep wearing masks and practicing...

Older adults in long-term care develop detectible antibodies after COVID-19 vaccination, which may mean it's safe to reopen these facilities, according to a new study.

But because it's unclear how long the antibodies last, researchers from University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) say there's still a need to monitor symptoms and controls on reopening.

"COVID-19 hit long-term ca...

FRIDAY, April 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors might have figured out why AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine may cause life-threatening blood clots in very rare cases.

The discovery, made in a pair of reports published online Friday in the New England Journal of Medicine, could be key to the global rollout of the AstraZeneca vaccine, helping develo...

In a setback to a national vaccination campaign that was finally gaining ground, the federal government said Thursday that Johnson & Johnson will allocate 86 percent fewer doses of its coronavirus vaccine across the United States next week.

The company delivered the first batch of its single-dose vaccine at the beginning of March, sending 2.8 million doses across the country before d...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 9, 2021
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A new clinical trial will investigate whether people who are highly allergic or have what's known as a mast cell disorder are at higher risk for a sudden allergic reaction to the Moderna or Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines.

"The public understandably has been concerned about reports of rare, severe allergic reactions to the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, d...

Two COVID-19 vaccines appear to work well against a rapidly spreading coronavirus variant that arose in California, but less effective against a variant that first emerged in South Africa, researchers report.

"The good news is the California variant does not appear to be a problem for our current vaccines," said study author David Montefiori, director of the Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine Re...

Two people in the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine trial developed Guillain-Barré syndrome, but it's highly doubtful the vaccine is to blame, according to a just-published case study.

Although both people were in the same trial, one was given the vaccine and the other was given a placebo of saline solution.

"That strengthens the possibility that the case in our report may have be...

In findings that bode well for the full reopening of schools across America, a new government survey shows that nearly 80 percent of school employees and child care workers have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine.

Released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday, the latest figures came as the Biden administration pushes to reopen schools by...

There's good news for the millions of Americans who've already received a dose or two of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine: New research shows the vaccine should protect against illness for at least six months.

The new study tracked 33 participants in the trials that led to the vaccine's approval. Six months after having received their second vaccine dose, "antibody activity remained high in al...

The U.S. government won't require vaccine passports for travel and businesses, the nation's top infectious diseases expert said Monday.

"I doubt that the federal government will be the main mover of a vaccine passport concept," Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a Politico Dispatch podcast.

The federal government "may be involved in making sure things are done fairly and eq...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 6, 2021
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The sooner a pregnant woman gets a COVID-19 vaccine, the more likely she is to transfer protective antibodies to her baby, a new, small study suggests.

"This just gives extra fuel for people who are on the fence or just think, 'Maybe I'll wait until after I deliver,'" said study co-author Dr. Emily Miller. She's an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology and a maternal fetal medi...

A new U.S. study offers more evidence that a single dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine may provide enough protection to people who've previously been infected with the coronavirus.

"Our findings extend those from smaller studies reported elsewhere and support a potential strategy of providing a single dose of vaccine to persons with a confirmed prior history of coronavirus infection, al...

Despite the recent contamination of 15 million doses of Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine at a Baltimore plant, the Biden administration on Sunday reassured Americans that there will still be enough doses to vaccinate every American adult by the end of May.

Johnson & Johnson will take over responsibility for manufacturing at the plant, U.S. health officials announced late Satu...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 5, 2021
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Just because you've had your COVID-19 vaccination doesn't mean you can stop taking steps to protect yourself and others, experts say.

So far, only about 16% of Americans have been fully vaccinated, and on March 24, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a 6.7% increase in the seven-day average number of daily cases, compared to the prior week.

About 60,000 peo...

Many Americans are fine with donating at least some COVID-19 vaccines to less wealthy nations, but that support varies between different groups, a new poll finds.

Recent estimates show that wealthy countries -- which have just one-fifth of the world's adult population -- have bought more than half of the world's total vaccine doses, leaving less for low- and middle-income countries.

Kids will be kids, and that's exactly why Holly McDade plans to get her three young children the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it becomes available to them.

"Little kids can't help but touch their mouths and their noses and touch other things," said McDade, 32, of Strasburg, Va. "They just don't think about it. It's not where their brains are at yet."

McDade isn't concerned so much ab...

In a push to overcome vaccine hesitancy, the Biden administration on Thursday launched a public outreach effort that will focus on communities that have been hit hardest by the pandemic.

Called the "We Can Do This" campaign, the project features television and social media ads and creates a "community corps" of public health, athletic, faith and other groups to spread the word about the s...

The faster-spreading COVID-19 variant first detected in the United Kingdom is on its way to becoming the dominant form of the virus in the United States.

A new study found that the B.1.1.7 variant is being detected in an increasing proportion of SARS-CoV-2 samples and is 40% to 50% more transmissible than versions of the virus that were previously dominant.

Together with previous re...

More than one-quarter of U.S. parents don't plan to vaccinate their kids for COVID-19, and roughly as many oppose school-required coronavirus shots, a new study finds.

This opposition was more common among moms than dads, and was especially common among white mothers who identified as Republican/Republican-leaning, the researchers said.

"Women tend to serve as family health managers...

In a finding that illustrates the heavy toll the pandemic has taken on America, a new government report confirms that COVID-19 became the third leading cause of death in 2020.

Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that more than 547,000 lives have been lost to COVID-19 since the pandemic began last spring. Only the two long-term biggest killers, hea...

It's the question everyone wants answered because reopening the world depends on it: Can coronavirus vaccines stop transmission of the virus?

Now, 21 universities across the United States are teaming up to find out.

The project, called Prevent COVID U, was started by the COVID-19 Prevention Network housed at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

The study inc...

Pfizer Inc. announced Wednesday that its coronavirus vaccine is safe and remarkably effective in children as young as 12.

In a news release issued by Pfizer and its vaccine development partner, BioNTech, company executives said data from a trial of the vaccine in nearly 2,300 people between the ages of 12 and 15 will be submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the coming...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 31, 2021
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As new coronavirus cases begin to rise again across America, President Joe Biden on Monday called on governors to bring back state mask mandates.

Just hours earlier, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, delivered an emotional plea to Americans to keep following social distancing measures to stem the spread of COVID-19.

The former H...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 30, 2021
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The two-dose mRNA vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna have proven to be potent weapons against COVID-19 infection among health care workers, first responders and essential workers in the real world, a new U.S. government study shows.

After following nearly 4,000 volunteers in six states over a 13-week period, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the risk...

The Biden administration and private companies are working to develop a standard for a "vaccine passport" that could be used as the country tries to reopen in the coming months.

The effort has gained steam following President Biden's pledge that the nation will begin to return to normal this summer and with a growing number of companies saying they will require proof of vaccination b...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 29, 2021
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Fifteen years of widespread vaccination of U.S. children with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is reaping big rewards: A more than 80% drop in new infections has been seen in women and girls under the age of 25.

That could mean an equally big drop to come in a host of dangerous conditions that are linked to HPV infection, including cancers of the cervix, anogenital area and mouth/th...

States are scrambling to vaccinate as many people as they can while the rate of new U.S. coronavirus infections stays steady, but still high, for a third week.

At more than 55,000 new COVID-19 cases a day, public health experts believe that is a level that could rapidly become yet another surge, The New York Times reported.

A sense of urgency is being felt keenly by st...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 26, 2021
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In some good news to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, new research shows that pregnant women and new breastfeeding moms have a strong immune response to COVID-19 vaccines and can transfer that immunity to their infants.

The study included 131 women of reproductive age (84 pregnant, 31 lactating and 16 not pregnant) who received one of two mRNA vaccines: Pfizer or Moderna.

Vacc...

Following a sharp rebuke from an independent oversight board over potentially misleading information on the effectiveness of its coronavirus vaccine, AstraZeneca released new data late Wednesday that showed the vaccine is slightly less effective than the company claimed on Monday.

The pharmaceutical giant stressed that its vaccine is still very powerful at preventing infection with C...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 25, 2021
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It's very rare, but it is possible to catch COVID-19 even if you've been vaccinated, a new study finds.

Looking at vaccinated health care workers at two University of California campuses, researchers found a tiny number tested positive for the virus. This finding highlights the need to keep wearing a mask and to keep social distancing, the researchers said.

"Because of the compulso...

Health care workers were just as uneasy as everyone else when COVID-19 vaccines were about to be approved in the United States, with large numbers hesitant to take the shot in early December, a new study reveals.

But that hesitancy dwindled over the next few weeks, as health system employees learned more about the safety and efficacy data gathered during clinical trials of the vaccines, r...

U.S. health officials called the results of AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine trial into question early Tuesday, saying the company may have used outdated data that could have changed its conclusion about the efficacy of the vaccine.

On Monday morning, AstraZeneca had announced that its vaccine was 79 percent effective in protecting against COVID-19 infection in the large U.S. clinic...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 23, 2021
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AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine was 79 percent effective in protecting against COVID-19 infection in a large U.S. clinical trial, the company announced Monday.

The findings may help restore confidence in the vaccine that was lost recently after more than a dozen countries, mostly in Europe, suspended use of the shot following reports of rare blood clots. Most of those countries ret...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 22, 2021
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The U.S. COVID-19 vaccination program is proceeding apace, with more than one-fifth of adult Americans having received at least one dose and eligibility opening up for everyone by May 1, under orders from President Joe Biden.

That means the fully vaccinated now have one pressing question: What can I do now that I haven't been able to do before?

In a new

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 19, 2021
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  • President Joe Biden said Thursday that his administration's promise of 100 million vaccinations in the first 100 days of his administration will be met Friday, more than 40 days ahead of schedule.

    "I'm proud to announce that tomorrow, 58 days into our administration, we will have met our goal," Biden said during a speech on the state of the country's vaccination campaign. He added th...

    • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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    • March 19, 2021
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    Fewer than 1 in 10 people in Wuhan carried COVID-19 antibodies in their bloodstream four months after the coronavirus outbreak in the Chinese city that served as a harbinger of a global pandemic, a new study shows.

    Further, only about 40% of those people tested positive for the sort of neutralizing antibodies needed to stave off a future infection, according to the report, published March...

    Don't believe everything you hear: A sizable minority of Americans are still hesitant about getting the new COVID-19 vaccine, but their fears are mostly not warranted, a leading vaccine expert says.

    "Not only has it been shown to be safe in tens of thousands of people before approval, it's been shown to be safe in tens of millions of people post-approval," Dr. Paul Offit, director of the ...

    Reinfection with COVID-19 in people who've already had the illness is very rare, and most people are protected against reinfection for at least six months, a new report finds. However, immunity appears to drop sharply in those aged 65 and older, researchers found.

    Reporting Wednesday in The Lancet, a team of Danish scientists looked at reinfection rates among 4 million peop...

    • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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    • March 18, 2021
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    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be wondering if they should get a COVID-19 shot, and the answer is definitely yes, an expert says.

    "The big takeaway message is the COVID-19 vaccine is strongly recommended for patients with multiple sclerosis," said Dr. Nancy Sicotte, director of the Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Program at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles.

    "If you have a...

    For many, it's like emerging suddenly from a long, dark tunnel.

    Some people who've been laid low for months by so-called "long haul" symptoms after a coronavirus infection say that within days of getting their COVID-19 vaccine, those symptoms nearly disappeared.

    Speaking with The New York Times, Bridget Hayward, a 51-year-old operating room nurse in Alexandria, Va....

    With tens of millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses going into American arms, pressure is mounting for a U.S. "vaccine passport" that would allow the fully immunized to travel freely and more easily enjoy other aspects of pre-pandemic life.

    More than two dozen airline trade organizations, labor unions and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have asked the White House to "establish uniform guidance" ...

    States are rapidly expanding eligibility for coronavirus vaccines as they race to meet President Joe Biden's deadline to have shots for all American adults by May 1.

    At the beginning of the vaccine rollout, COVID-19 vaccines were available only to the most vulnerable Americans and some essential workers. Now, three states -- Maine, Virginia and Wisconsin -- along with Washington, D.C...

    • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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    • March 17, 2021
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    COVID-19 Antibodies Found in 1 in 5 U.S. Blood Donations

    COVID-19 antibodies were found in the blood of about 1 in 5 donations from unvaccinated donors in the first week of March, American Red Cross data shows.

    The organization tested more than 3.3 million donations from unvaccinated people in 44 states between mid-June 2020 and early March 2021. Across the entire p...

    Talking with their doctors may help convince reluctant Americans to get COVID-19 vaccines, evidence from a previous pandemic suggests.

    Researchers analyzed responses from more than 19,000 people in the United States who were surveyed during the H1N1 swine flu pandemic in 2009.

    The poll assessed respondents' attitudes toward doctors, their openness to discussing vaccines with their p...

    The Biden Administration is deliberating on a nationwide face mask standard for workplaces, although it has already missed its own deadline for a decision.

    On Jan. 21, Biden told the Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to determine by March 15, if such a standard is needed, CBS News reported.

    An emergency temporary standard on face m...

    • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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    • March 16, 2021
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    This year, COVID-19 has made decisions around surgery tougher than ever for folks who may need one. But one major medical group can help provide some answers.

    Top on their list: Is it safe to have surgery right now?

    "It is very safe to have surgery, especially with all of the precautions in place," said Dr. Beverly Philip, president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)...

    Health care workers are more likely to catch COVID-19 at home or in their community than on the job, a new study finds.

    "The news is reassuring in that it shows the measures taken are working to prevent infections from spreading in health care facilities," said study co-author Dr. Anthony Harris. He's professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medi...

    In more good news on the coronavirus vaccine front, a new government report finds that 88% of Americans who get their first COVID-19 shot return for their second.

    That bodes well for the United States, since full vaccination is vital to stopping the pandemic.

    In December 2020, the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines were approved for emergency use, but both require two shots to get...

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