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25 Oct

The Weather and Your Heart

Certain weather conditions may increase the risk of heart attack.

Health News Results - 96

Major Flooding Can Bring Skin Infection Dangers

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Flooding from hurricanes and other natural disasters increases the risk of skin infections among victims and relief workers, a skin expert warns.

"In 2017, we experienced almost as many flooding events as we did throughout the previous 10 years," said Dr. Justin Bandino. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at San Antonio Military Medica...

Blood Donors Needed as Cold Weather Freezes U.S. Supply

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. blood supply is expected to drop to dangerously low levels as sub-zero weather in many parts of the country forces cancellation of crucial blood drives, American Red Cross officials warn.

Severe winter weather has already led to 370 cancellations across the country, resulting in the loss of 11,600 anticipated blood donations, the ag...

AHA: Chilling Studies Show Cold Weather Could Raise Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- Overexertion with a snow shovel isn't the only cardiovascular risk during the winter.

When temperatures go down, the incidence of stroke -- the country's fifth-leading cause of death -- appears to go up.

"There have been a number of studies that have confirmed this in different parts of the world," said Dr. Daniel Lac...

Polar Vortex Brings Frostbite Danger: Protect Yourself

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Minus 29 Fahrenheit in Fargo, minus 28 in Minneapolis, minus 13 in Des Moines.

With potential record-setting low temperatures ahead for much of the nation, one expert warns that frostbite can quickly strike exposed skin.

"With wind chills approaching the single digits and below zero, it is possible to develop 'frostnip' with progr...

Plunging Temperatures a Threat to People With Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The polar vortex that has enveloped much of the United States this week poses a special danger to people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

"This type of weather can be hazardous for everyone, but even more so for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease, who may have difficulty noticing temperature and weather changes...

Layer Up During the Polar Vortex

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a giant polar vortex sweeps down over most of the United States, bringing with it temperatures so frigid that frostbite and hypothermia can happen within minutes, doctors have some advice for those who dare to venture outside.

The swath of the cold freeze is so wide and deep that roughly 75 percent of Americans living on the U.S. mainland...

Climate Change Already Hurting Human Health, Review Shows

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change is already having clear effects on human health, according to a new review that describes the situation as a "health emergency."

"Climate change is causing injuries, illnesses and deaths now from heat waves, infectious diseases, food and water insecurity, and changes in air quality, among other adverse health outcomes," said ...

Simple Treatments to Banish Winter Blues

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The gray days of winter bring many people down, but a few simple steps can pep you up, an expert says.

A condition known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can cause feelings of sadness or depression, lack of energy, problems sleeping, moodiness, changes in appetite and loss of interest in usual activities.

"It is most common amo...

Climate Change Ups Heat Deaths, Especially Among Elderly: Report

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of heat-related disease and death is rising worldwide due to climate change, a new report warns.

Hotter temperatures threaten the elderly and other vulnerable people with heat stress, and heart and kidney disease, according to an international team of experts.

Last year, more than 157 million at-risk people were exposed to ...

Warmer Winters, More Violent Crimes?

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Milder winters caused by climate change may lead to an increase in violent crime in the United States, researchers say.

"During mild winters, more people are out and about, creating the key ingredient for interpersonal crimes: opportunity," explained study author Ryan Harp, from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

The findings ar...

AHA: Warm, Wet Weather Linked to Better Outcomes for Stroke Survivors

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Rainy days may bring a lot more than relief from summer heat -- they also are connected to better survival chances and overall outlook for stroke survivors, according to a new study.

Researchers examining the connection between strokes and seasonal weather in the United States found that hospital admissions for ischemic strokes, ...

Climate Change Could Change the Ragweed Sneezin' Season

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you live in Maine and you've never experienced hay fever, new research predicts that climate change has an unwelcome surprise in store for you.

Warmer temperatures in the northern United States will allow ragweed -- the plant that triggers hay fever -- to flourish in areas it's never been before. About 35 years from now, the study predict...

Cold, Windy Days Can Strain the Heart

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Brisk autumn winds and chilly winter temperatures may make you more vulnerable to heart trouble, a new study suggests.

Researchers found "an increase in heart attacks in low temperature, strong wind, low sunshine duration and low atmospheric pressure," said senior author Dr. David Erlinge, head of cardiology at Lund University in Sweden.

Warmer Weather Gets Seniors Outdoors and Moving

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The better the weather, the more seniors venture out and get active.

So say researchers who assessed the activity levels of more than 1,200 adults in Norway, aged 70 to 77, who were grouped based on whether they scored low, medium or high on a fitness test.

"Older people in poor physical condition become less physically active if th...

Michael's Lingering Threat: Mold

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the flooding and devastation left by Hurricane Michael, Americans faced with the clean-up are facing a new health threat: mold.

Mold-related illnesses are a serious concern following severe flooding in the path of the storm, say experts from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

"Where there's dampness and water, ther...

As Hurricane Michael Hits Florida, Experts Urge Safety

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As category 4 Hurricane Michael slammed into northern Florida on Wednesday, the National Safety Council offered residents steps to stay safe.

First, the council urges those in the storm's path to monitor its progress and heed government warnings.

It's vital to take a look at safety procedures you'll need during any severe weathe...

As Hurricane Michael Nears, Expert Warns of Gas-Powered Generator Dangers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hurricane Michael, now a powerful category 4 storm, is expected to make landfall in northern Florida Wednesday.

And as with every such storm, power outages will occur, along with the risk of deadly carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from gas-powered generators.

"Unfortunately, poison control centers continue to see surges in generato...

AHA: Stroke Care Gains in Puerto Rico Falter After Hurricane Maria

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- A project aimed at improving the inequalities in stroke care between Puerto Rico and the mainland did just that -- until Hurricane Maria roared ashore last September and further hobbled the territory's already inadequate health care system, experts say.

Researchers at the University of Miami started the Florida-Puerto Rico Collab...

Florence's Lingering Threat: Mold

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, residents of the Carolinas are facing a new health threat: mold.

Mold-related illnesses are a serious concern following severe flooding in North and South Carolina, say experts from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

"Where there's dampness and water, there's mold," said Paul...

After Florence Comes the Cleanup: Stay Safe

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- True to its storm-of-the-century hype, Hurricane Florence pounded the Carolinas with historic rainfall and catastrophic flooding -- and continuing danger looms in its wake.

Infection and injury are the big threats as cleanup begins, and experts say it's important to be smart as you tackle the dirty work.

"The 'it's-not-going-to-happ...

Flooding One of Florence's Big Dangers

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As Florence unleashes her full fury on the Carolinas, residents who stayed put need to know that flooding will be even more dangerous than the high winds of this hurricane.

Making landfall near Wrightsville Beach, N.C., around 7 a.m. Friday, the category 1 hurricane was pounding the historic town of New Bern, which sits just to the north of...

As Earth Warms, Heat-Related Deaths Will Multiply

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could become very deadly, as heat-related deaths rise with increases in global temperatures, a new report shows.

"Currently, we are on a trajectory to reach over 3 degrees Celsius of warming, and if this trend continues there would be serious consequences for health in many parts of the world," said study co-author Antonio Ga...

Beware a Bolt From the Blue

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- They say lightning never strikes twice, but once is enough for the 47 people it kills in the United States each year.

The National Weather Center calls lightning "an underrated killer, hotter than the surface of the sun."

According to University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers, Nebraska alone sees an average of 773,000 lig...

As Hurricane Florence Targets U.S., Experts Urge Safety

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With Hurricane Florence barreling toward the Carolinas, the National Safety Council offers steps to stay safe.

As mass evacuations begin in coastal North Carolina, and states of emergency are declared in Virginia and North and South Carolina, the council urges those along the East Coast to monitor the storm's path and heed government warnin...

More Rattlesnake Bites After Rainy Spells

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The threat of rattlesnake bites in California decreases during droughts and increases after rainy weather, a new study finds.

Rainy spells result in more shrub growth and, with that, more rodents, the snakes' primary food source, said study author Dr. Grant Lipman, an emergency medicine physician at Stanford Medicine, and colleagues.

...

Severity of Alzheimer's Can Vary by Season

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The thinking ability of people with Alzheimer's disease changes depending on the season, researchers report.

These patients are better in the late summer and early fall than in the winter and spring, according to the analysis of data on nearly 3,400 Alzheimer's patients in the United States, Canada and France.

"There may be value in...

Forecast Sees Abnormal Heat Worldwide Through 2022

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- This year's record-breaking worldwide heat wave is likely a preview of coming attractions, scientists say.

Using a new method for predicting global temperatures, researchers concluded that 2018-2022 may be even hotter than expected.

While global warming appeared to have eased early in the 21st century, the new forecasting method ...

AHA: With Hurricane Season Underway, Health Experts Urge More Support for the Vulnerable

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- When Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico last fall, José Maldonado was heartbroken. Although he now lives in Maryland, he has strong ties to the island where he was born. But when his sisters tried to convince him to help with disaster relief, he was skeptical.

"In the beginning, I told them they were crazy to have me do...

Study Forecasts Dramatic Floods in Western U.S. Due to Climate Change

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could more than double the risk of rain-on-snow flooding in parts of the western United States and Canada by the end of the century, researchers report.

The risk is highest in the Sierra Nevada, the Colorado River headwaters and the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Rain-on-snow events can cause damaging flooding as rapid snowmelt trigge...

Climate Change Means More Deadly Heat Waves: Study

TUESDAY, July 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As the northern hemisphere is struck by one deadly heat wave after another this summer, new research suggests things are only going to get worse.

Climate change is triggering record high temperatures. And extreme heat has been blamed for hundreds of deaths, while dangerous wildfires have raced through neighborhoods in the western United State...

Summers Less Smoggy Now, But Winter Air Hasn't Improved

FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Air quality improvements in the United States have been significant but largely limited to summer. Now, researchers say they know why.

For decades, summer air was the worst of the year, replete with haze-containing particles that cause asthma, lung cancer and other illnesses.

But overall lower levels of emissions from power plants an...

It's Hot Outside: How to Stay Safe When Thermometers Rise

FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As much of the United States continues to swelter through 90-plus temperatures and high humidity, one emergency physician is offering advice on keeping safe.

First, Dr. Robert Glatter said, it's important to know that anyone can be a victim of heat stroke, but some people are at particular risk.

"Heat stroke develops when the body is...

AHA: Protect Your Heart and Health During 'Dog Days' of Summer

TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Summer is a time for barbecues and other outdoor fun, but it's also a time for sweltering heat. And experts say everyone, especially the elderly and very young, need to know how to limit the potentially deadly effects of high temperatures.

The ancient Greeks and Romans called the sultriest days of summer the "dog days." The Old F...

Heat Waves Can Dull Even Young Minds, Study Says

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As America sweats through another summer, new research suggests that heat waves can slow the brains of even healthy young adults.

In the face of extreme heat, college students living in dorms without air conditioning did worse on tests of mental skills than their cooled-off counterparts, researchers found.

Both test-taking speed an...

Keep Pets Safe From July 4th's Fireworks, Summer's Sizzle

TUESDAY, July 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Is your dog the type to dive under a bed at the first pop of a firecracker? Is your cat suddenly avoiding stretching out for a snooze in her favorite sunny spot? Although many humans adore the warmer weather, holidays and outside activities of summer, they can be a challenge for your furry friends.

Here's some advice on getting your pet throu...

Beat the Heat on Your Summer Vacation

MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Before you head out for a sunny summer getaway, get familiar with the signs of heat-related illnesses. Once at your destination, build in time for your body to adjust to the climate.

If you're lounging by the water and taking only short walks, your risk of a heat illness is low. But if you're not in great shape and aren't used to the heat, bewa...

The Hot Dog You Shouldn't Have

FRIDAY, June 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The scorching heat of summer poses dangers to people, but dogs also need protection from soaring temperatures, one veterinarian warns.

Benjamin Brainard, director of clinical research at the University of Georgia's College of Veterinary Medicine, offered the following tips to help pet owners keep their dogs cool when it heats up outside:

Health Tips for Summer Fun

TUESDAY, June 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Summertime means fun time, but you still need to follow some basic health and safety precautions.

Dehydration is a common summer problem and often results in dizziness, dry mouth and lightheadedness. But it also can be more severe, according to Dr. Ravi Rao, a family medicine physician at Penn State's medical center.

Mild dehydratio...

Humidity Won't Hamper Spread of Flu Virus

THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Humidity doesn't hinder the ability of flu viruses to infect people, claims a new study that challenges a long-held belief that the viruses become less active in moist conditions.

The researchers found that mucus and other airway secretions expelled during coughs or sneezes protect flu viruses when they're airborne, regardless of humidity lev...

This Is When You're Most Likely to Die From a Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, June 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Maybe there's a good reason you dislike cold weather: The risk of death from a heart attack is higher in the winter than in the summer, a new study says.

Researchers at Leeds General Infirmary in England examined data from more than 4,000 patients treated for heart attack over four years.

They found the risk of dying within 30 day...

AHA: Health Concerns Haunt Puerto Rico as New Hurricane Season Begins

THURSDAY, May 31, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Hospitals and clinics in Puerto Rico are still dealing with the massive destruction Hurricane Maria left throughout the island last year.

Yet even as the recovery continues -- and as Puerto Ricans look ahead to the next hurricane season beginning Friday -- physicians also are worrying about Maria's long-term health implications fo...

Thirsty Mosquitoes May Bite More in Droughts

TUESDAY, May 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your blood mght be a thirst quencher for mosquitoes during a drought.

A new study found that while female mosquitoes need the protein in blood to lay eggs, they also bite you to stay hydrated.

According to the research team from the University of Cincinnati, learning more about how often these insects need to drink blood in dry con...

Be Smart When It Comes to Spring Allergies and Asthma

FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of things grow in the spring, including your risk of severe allergic reactions and asthma attacks. So people need to take preventive measures and know when to seek medical care, an emergency physician says.

"Spring tends to bring more people to the emergency department," Dr. Paul Kivela, president of the American College of Emergency Phys...

Health Concerns Rise Along With Hawaii Eruptions

TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's more trouble in paradise: The eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano may lead to respiratory and other health problems for residents of the Big Island, an expert warns.

Besides facing the possibility of more devastating lava flows, Hawaiians must contend with high levels of toxic volcanic ash and smog, said an atmospheric scientist at th...

When Temperatures Fall, Heart Attack Risk May Rise

FRIDAY, May 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Colder weather may raise the risk for a heart attack, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers in Taiwan found that heart attack rates fluctuated seasonally, with more occurring in winter than summer. When the temperature fell below 59 degrees Fahrenheit, heart attacks increased dramatically, the study authors said.

"When the tempera...

Exercising in the Great Outdoors

MONDAY, May 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Outdoor exercise can be invigorating and a great morale booster. But always take a few simple steps to stay safe, no matter the season.

For starters, dress for the weather. Whether it's cold or hot, that usually involves layering so you can start off warm and peel off layers as you heat up.

In warm weather, check out your local heat i...

The Cold Truth About Migraine Headaches

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Early humans' ability to adapt to cold climates may have been helped by a genetic variant that's common in modern people who live in colder regions -- and is linked with migraine headaches, researchers say.

Within the last 50,000 years, humans left Africa and colonized cold areas in Asia, Europe, and other parts of the world. And this coloniza...

Nearby Lightning Shut Down a Woman's Brain Implant

TUESDAY, May 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A European woman who needed an implanted brain device got an unwelcome side effect during a storm: Nearby lightning switched the device off.

Experts say the phenomenon is likely rare, and the deep brain stimulator device worked fine again once it was turned back on by doctors.

Still, it's a hazard worth looking out for, medical expe...

As Weather Changes, So Do Social Media Posts

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Too hot, too cold, too humid: Weather may influence whether or not people post negative comments on social media, researchers report.

They compared weather conditions in relation to 2.4 billion Facebook posts and 1.1 billion Twitter posts between 2009 and 2016.

And they found a strong association between specific weather factors...

Spring Sneezin' Season Has Sprung

THURSDAY, April 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you suffer from allergies, you already know that pollen is in the air -- even in the parts of the United States with unseasonably cool temperatures. So what kind of allergy season can we expect this year?

Will we see a return of the pollen vortex? Might we have a blooming bombogenesis of pollen?

Don't scoff: There is some evi...

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