New features, new look and now mobile-responsive! No need to re-register.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Cancer: Breast".

Health News Results - 204

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Younger breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for osteoporosis -- weak, brittle bones -- due to breast cancer treatments, new study finds.

The study included 211 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer within the past nearly three years and 567 women with no history of cancer.

Over about six years of follow-up, women...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hot flashes, a common curse in menopause, can be especially bothersome after breast cancer. But a new study suggests an existing medication may help.

The drug is oxybutynin (Ditropan XL), long used to treat urinary incontinence.

The study found that women taking the medicine had an average of five fewer hot flashes a week, compared w...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's more evidence that when a survivor of early stage breast cancer takes up healthy eating and regular exercise, the odds of the disease returning go down.

The key is sticking with such programs, said study lead author Dr. Wolfgang Janni.

Healthier lifestyles "might improve the prognosis of breast cancer patients if adherence is ...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Younger breast cancer patients who have one or both breasts removed have lower levels of satisfaction and well-being than those who have breast-conserving surgery, a new study finds.

The study included 560 women diagnosed with breast cancer by age 40. Of those, 28 percent had breast-conserving surgery and 72 percent had breast removal surgery (...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even with the same treatment, black women with the most common form of breast cancer experience higher recurrence and death rates than white women, a new trial reveals.

The finding pokes holes in the prevailing notion that black women with breast cancer fare worse due to less access to quality medical care, experts said. While that factor may...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Tamoxifen is considered a vital weapon in the fight against breast cancer, but many women who have to take the drug struggle with its significant side effects.

Now, new research shows that a lower dose of the hormone therapy helped prevent breast cancer from returning and guarded against new cancers in women who had high-risk breast tissue.

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For many breast cancer patients, removal of lymph nodes in the armpit area is a common procedure, due to worries that the tumor has spread to these tissues.

But the operation can also bring the difficult long-term side effect of lymphedema, a painful arm swelling.

Now, new Dutch research suggests that for early stage breast cancer p...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For certain women with early stage breast cancer, a newer drug that combines an antibody with chemotherapy may cut the risk of disease recurrence in half, a new trial finds.

The study focused on nearly 1,500 women with early stage breast cancer that was HER2-positive -- meaning it carries a protein that promotes cancer growth.

Abou...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women at increased risk for breast cancer should start receiving mammograms earlier than recommended, even as young as age 30, a new study contends.

Young women who have dense breasts or a family history of breast cancer appear to benefit from regular mammograms as much as women in their 40s do, researchers reported.

The findings ...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Few American mothers learn from their health care providers that breastfeeding can reduce the risk of breast cancer, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed more than 700 mothers. Of the 92 percent who said they'd breastfed, 56 percent said they knew that breastfeeding reduced breast cancer risk before they made the decision to nurse.

<...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women confused by the conflicting advice surrounding the benefits and timing of mammograms will be interested in a new study out of Sweden.

The research, involving more than 50,000 breast cancer patients, found that those who took part in a breast cancer screening program had a 60 percent lower risk of dying from the disease in the 10 years aft...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who love the early hours of the day are less likely to develop breast cancer, a new study suggests.

British researchers analyzed two data banks that included more than 409,000 women to investigate the link between sleep traits and breast cancer risk.

Compared to night owls, women who are early risers had a 40 percent lower risk...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many women living with advanced breast cancer face significant financial strains -- from paying for their care to simply covering monthly bills, a new survey finds.

Researchers found that of the more than 1,000 women they surveyed, nearly 70 percent said they were worried about the financial fallout related to their cancer. Many said they'd...

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Paying extra for those pricey organic fruits and vegetables might pay off: New research suggests eating them might help you dodge a cancer diagnosis.

People who consumed the most organic foods had a 25 percent lower cancer risk compared with those who ate the least, the study found.

Specifically, eating more organically grown foods ...

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Dropping weight might do more than make an older woman feel good. New research suggests it could lower her odds of breast cancer.

"Our study indicates that moderate, relatively short-term weight reduction was associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women," said Dr. Rowan Chlebowski, from t...

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are four common myths about breast cancer that can affect prevention and treatment of the most common type of cancer in American women, an oncologist says.

The first is believing you're not at risk because no one in your family has cancer.

"Less than 10 percent of breast cancers are linked to genetics or linked to genes that yo...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many older breast cancer patients might worry that they will be struck by "chemo brain" after their treatments, but a new study suggests that only those who carry a gene linked to Alzheimer's face that risk.

Researchers found that breast cancer survivors carrying the APOE4 gene who underwent chemotherapy were more likely to experience long-...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Like the human gut, the breast gland has a "microbiome" that's influenced by diet, new animal research suggests.

Although the findings are preliminary, scientists hope their work might someday improve the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

"Being able to shift the breast microbiome through diet may offer a new approach to p...

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A personalized vaccine held an aggressive group of cancers in check among more than half of patients who received it in a small, preliminary trial, researchers report.

HER2-positive cancers are cancers that have too much of the HER2 protein on their surface. In that setting, a cancer can grow rapidly and be more likely to spread to other areas ...

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of breast cancer treatment rarely comes up in doctor-patient discussions -- but most patients wish it would, researchers report.

"Doctors and patients should be open to discussing the financial implications of treatment," said study author Dr. Rachel Greenup, of the Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, N.C.

"Cost transparency c...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most people carrying genes that put them at risk for cancer don't realize it, new research suggests.

Genetic screenings of more than 50,000 people found that more than 80 percent of those who carry a known gene variant for breast, ovarian, prostate or pancreatic cancer were unaware of their risk.

Researchers noted that most peopl...

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black women are more likely than white women to skip important hormonal breast cancer treatments, new research indicates.

Endocrine therapy is used to add, block or get rid of naturally occurring hormones like estrogen and progesterone that trigger certain types of breast cancer, the study authors explained. Previous studies have shown that ...

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women who undergo chemotherapy for lung cancer are more likely to experience early menopause, researchers have found.

The new study included 182 women who were an average age of 43 when they were diagnosed with lung cancer.

Within a year, 64 percent of the 85 women who received systemic chemotherapy had entered menopause, co...

FRIDAY, Aug. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Surviving breast cancer is certainly its own reward, but a new study finds that many who do are saddled with thousands in out-of-pocket expenses for years.

On average, breast cancer survivors get hit with an extra $1,100 in yearly out-of-pocket cancer-driven costs, researchers found.

But interviews with 129 breast cancer survivors fu...

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Testing for gene mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancer is rare among some Medicare patients who have the cancers and qualify for such tests, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from 12 southeastern states between 2000 and 2014. Only 8 percent of 92 women who met Medicare criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing received it wi...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For women with advanced breast cancer who carry the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, an experimental drug could improve survival, a new study suggests.

The BRCA mutations are linked with a greater risk for aggressive breast and ovarian cancer. The drug, talazoparib, works by blocking an enzyme called poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), thus p...

TUESDAY, Aug. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of genetic analysis could identify millions of Americans at high risk for five serious and common diseases, researchers report.

The diseases include coronary artery disease, the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and breast cancer.

Researchers tested and validated the ge...

MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Few Americans know that inactivity can increase the risk of colon, breast and other types of cancer, a new study finds.

An analysis of survey responses from 351 people revealed that while many knew a sedentary lifestyle increased their risk of heart disease (63.5 percent) and metabolic problems such as diabetes (65.8 percent), only 3.4 percent...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More genes associated with an increased risk of triple-negative breast cancer have been identified by researchers.

Until now, only mutations in the BRCA1 gene have been linked with this type of breast cancer.

"Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive type of cancer that cannot be treated using targeted therapies," study leade...

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The widely used chemotherapy drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) can be life-saving for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, a particularly aggressive form of the disease.

But new research now adds to mounting evidence that the treatment can take a toll on the heart, increasing the risk for heart failure.

The complication is uncommon, ...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As women around the world wage war against cancer, good news on the breast cancer front is tempered by predictions that lung cancer deaths could rise more than 40 percent.

Researchers in Spain reported that between 2015 and 2030, lung cancer deaths among women worldwide will likely increase 43 percent.

During that same period, howe...

THURSDAY, July 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Need another reason to improve your diet and start exercising? Doing so could help ward off cancer, a new study finds.

"Keep in mind that every lifestyle factor counts and it is never too late to adopt a healthy lifestyle," said study co-author Bernard Srour, of the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research.

Eating h...

MONDAY, July 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of treatment for early stage breast cancer can be devastating for many patients, but they get little guidance or help from their doctors, a new study suggests.

"We have made a lot of progress in breast cancer treatment, which is wonderful. But this study shows we are only part of the way to our goal. We must now turn our efforts to co...

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Having a late dinner and heading straight to bed may boost your risk of breast or prostate cancer, a new study suggests.

Spanish researchers analyzed data from 621 prostate cancer patients and 1,205 breast cancer patients, as well as 872 men and 1,321 women without these cancers.

People who ate their evening meal before 9 p.m. or ...

TUESDAY, July 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to genetic testing for breast cancer patients, their surgeons wield great influence on that decision, new research shows.

Genetic testing can provide important information that might affect treatment choices for breast cancer, but previous research shows that only about half of women who could benefit received such testing.

...

WEDNESDAY, June 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of vitamin D may reduce a woman's risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at more than 5,000 women, 55 and older, and found that those with vitamin D blood levels of 60 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) or more had an 80 percent lower risk for breast cancer than those with levels of 20 ng/mL or less.

...

TUESDAY, June 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Flight attendants may face higher-than-average risks of breast and skin cancers, a new study finds -- though the reasons why aren't yet clear.

Harvard researchers found that compared with women in the general U.S. population, female flight attendants had a 51 percent higher rate of breast cancer. Meanwhile, their rates of melanoma and non-mel...

TUESDAY, June 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Using automated breast density measurements, Norwegian researchers were able to more precisely confirm that women with dense breasts have a higher risk of breast cancer.

The study included more than 100,000 women and more than 300,000 screening exams.

"We found that screening examinations of women having dense breasts showed highe...

THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new international review suggests that having more body fat may protect premenopausal women from developing some types of breast cancer.

"We found strong evidence of an inverse association of body mass index [BMI] with risk of breast cancer diagnosis before menopause, with lower breast cancer rates among women who were heavier compared wi...

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For women who have their breast removed while fighting cancer, using their own tissue for breast reconstruction is better than implants, a new study suggests.

More than 60 percent of women who undergo breast removal to treat breast cancer decide to have breast reconstruction, and that rate is rising. But the researchers said that there has ...

TUESDAY, June 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Judy Perkins was 49 and battling breast cancer that had spread, but chemotherapy and hormone treatments had failed to rein in her disease. So, her doctors tried a highly sophisticated, but experimental, immunotherapy.

It worked beyond their wildest expectations: Her body was cleared of all signs of cancer. And the research team that tried the ...

SATURDAY, June 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new and highly targeted drug slowed the growth of advanced breast cancers by about an average of two months, researchers report.

"The findings in this study show a modest benefit to a subgroup of women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors," said Dr. Stephanie Bernik, a breast cancer specialist who wasn't involv...

SUNDAY, June 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of women with an early form of a common breast cancer may be able to skip chemotherapy, depending on the results of a comprehensive gene test.

The new study of nearly 7,000 women found that use of the already available Oncotype DX gene test could pinpoint those women who needed chemotherapy, and those who ...

THURSDAY, May 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- After surviving a diagnosis of breast cancer, women still need regular screening. But many of them, especially black women, aren't getting the mammograms they need, a new study finds.

It's essential to screen for a return of cancer so it can be treated before symptoms appear, the researchers explained.

"The use of regular mammograms...

THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who adopted a low-fat diet were more likely to survive for at least a decade after diagnosis, compared to patients who ate fattier fare, new research shows.

The study has "found yet another health benefit to eating a low-fat diet, and more fruits and vegetables," said lead researcher Dr. Rowan Chlebowski, a research pro...

THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive weight gain is never a good idea for health. Now, new research supports the notion that putting on pounds raises cancer risks for middle-aged women.

The study, which tracked more than 137,000 Norwegian women for 18 years, found that the odds of developing certain cancers rose as waistlines expanded.

The take-home message: ...

TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's good news for Americans in the war against cancer.

Cancer deaths continue to decline nationwide, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer.

But the report also points to one troubling trend -- prostate cancer deaths are creeping up again after years of decline, suggesting that controversy over the b...

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For years, the drug Herceptin has helped women with an aggressive form of breast cancer beat the disease.

But there's one downside: In a minority of cases, the drug can trigger heart damage.

Now, a new study finds that women who need the drug might get away with taking a shorter, less toxic course of Herceptin.

"This new...

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Much of the debate over when to start having mammograms has focused on lives saved, but new research suggests that early screening might also translate into smaller tumors and less aggressive breast cancer treatments.

"There are multiple benefits of mammography in terms of early detection. Not only do we save lives, but we reduce the likelihoo...

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Testing for small changes in the flow of lymph fluids after breast cancer surgery can spot the start of a painful swelling known as lymphedema before it becomes hard to treat, a new study suggests.

Evaluating nearly 150 breast cancer patients considered at high risk for lymphedema, researchers found that measuring lymph flow using bioimpedance...

Show All Health News Results

Wellness Library Results - 22

What's the disease that women fear the most? The answer is most likely to be breast cancer. And if you ask them the disease they're most likely to get, their answer would be breast cancer as well. But they would be wrong. Among the most lethal diseases of women in the United States, breast cancer lags behind heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, and Alzheimer's...

Just by coincidence, I usually see my breast surgeon in October, National Breast Cancer Awareness month, but I saw her early this year because she's on maternity leave again. After my visit, I ran into a friend. When I told her where I was, she suddenly looked alarmed. "I didn't know you had breast ... problems," she said, concerned. "I don't!" I jumped to reassure her. Then I was suddenly tongue...

In the Jewish Scriptures, it is written that every 49th year there is to be a Jubilee Year. In the Jubilee Year, all debts are forgiven and everyone is given a fresh start. As I approached my 49th birthday, I knew that something big was going to happen that was going to change my life forever. I never imagined that the vehicle would be breast cancer. While my 49th year was not always as joyful as ...

Anne Hofstadter is a breast cancer survivor. Her sister and mother have also had breast cancer. So Anne worries that her 46-year-old daughter may eventually be diagnosed with the disease -- especially since her daughter's paternal grandmother also suffered from it. But it never occurred to her to fret about her 44-year-old son. "I guess I knew men could get breast cancer, but it seemed more like a...

Judy* needed my medical clearance to keep walking. It was a beautiful fall morning in southern California, and more than 2,500 walkers were setting off for the final leg of a 75-mile, three-day walk from Santa Barbara to Malibu to raise money for breast cancer prevention. Judy was suited up in shorts and cross-training sneakers. Pinned to her pink t-shirt was a laminated picture of a young, vibran...

It used to be thought that the more the surgeon cut from a woman's breast, the more likely she was to survive breast cancer. By the time surgery was over, a woman with a small tumor in one breast would have lost her breast, the chest muscles underneath and a trail of the lymph nodes up to her collarbone. It's an image that still holds great power for many women who are newly diagnosed, but it's an...

If you find a lump in your breast, don't delay -- see your doctor as soon as possible. Anything you notice that's different from your normal breast tissue should be investigated. The good news is that more than 80 percent of breast lumps turn out to be benign tumors or cysts. How can my doctor tell whether a lump is cancerous? If a breast exam, mammogram, or follow-up ultrasound turns up a suspic...

How does breast cancer occur? Breast cells become cancerous when they mutate and start to multiply at an abnormally fast pace, crowding out healthy tissue. The abnormal cells grow into a dense mass that may be visible on a mammogram or that you may feel as a lump. Breast cancer typically starts in the ducts (passages through which milk travels to the nipple) or the lobules (areas where milk is pro...

Can a mammogram save my life? Mammograms -- X-ray pictures of the breasts -- are a valuable but imperfect tool for detecting breast cancer. The death rate from breast cancer has dropped dramatically in the last 20 or 30 years, but most of that progress is due to better treatments, not mammograms. While a mammogram can definitely uncover hidden cancers, recent research suggests that the X-rays don'...

How does depression affect cancer patients? For cancer patients, depression means much more than just a dark mood. The illness, which strikes about up to 25 percent of all cancer patients (compared with about 7 percent of the general public), can sap a person's immune system, weakening the body's ability to cope with disease. Patients fighting both depression and cancer feel distressed, tend to ha...

It was eye-catching news in 2002 when researchers called a halt to a major government-run study of a hormone therapy used by millions of older women. Researchers stopped the study, one of a series of clinical trials under the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), after they found that long-term use of estrogen and progestin raised the risk of heart disease, stroke, blood clots, and invasive breast canc...

What's a breast biopsy? A breast biopsy is a procedure in which a doctor removes a small amount of tissue or fluid from your breast in order to examine it under a microscope for signs of cancer. Your doctor will usually recommend a biopsy if there's a lump in your breast or something suspicious on your mammogram or ultrasound scan. About 80 percent of biopsies show that no cancer is present. If t...

You may have heard that some genes put women at extra risk for breast cancer. If your mother, grandmother, aunt, or sister has had the disease, you may very well wonder if a breast cancer gene runs in your family. The first thing you should know is that only a small minority of breast cancers -- about 5 to 10 percent -- can be traced to specific mutations, and even having family members with bre...

Why do I need to examine my breasts? Finding a tumor before the cancer has spread to other parts of your body can mean the difference between life and death. Many breast cancers are first detected by women themselves -- and according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), women who are attuned to changes in their bodies are more likely to spot a suspicious lump. New guidelines issued by the ACS sa...

"Take a walk. Earn big money, up to 1.7 cents per step!" If I saw an ad making that claim, I certainly would find it hard to believe. But in the last few years I have learned that in the fight against breast cancer, small steps can indeed lead to substantial cash. More than 20,000 people know the power of walking and understand that the meager per-step earnings add up to a healthy sum that helps ...

Responsible breast cancer specialists advise their new patients to weigh their options carefully before rushing into treatment. If you have breast cancer, you're likely to need a combination of therapies. These will depend on the type and size of the tumor, your age, and the degree to which the cancer has spread. Take your time as you think over each option, and consider taking your partner, a fri...

You've made it through many of the hard choices in your breast cancer treatment only to confront another major one: whether -- and when -- to have your breast (or breasts) reconstructed after your mastectomy. Some women want a fully reconstructed breast that looks as much as possible like the original. Others want a new breast that simply helps them look the way they like in a bathing suit. Still ...

What is radiation therapy? Radiation therapy, or radiotherapy, is the use of high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. If you have external radiotherapy, the most common radiation approach, the radiation will be aimed directly at your tumor or, if it's after surgery, at the whole breast. Isn't the radiation dangerous? Radiation kills healthy cells along with cancer cells, so it...

When you or someone you care about has or is facing the possibility of breast cancer, it is natural to feel many bewildering and frightening emotions. No one wants to get sick at all. Certainly no one wants to get cancer. And there are kinds of cancers that seem particularly terrible, not only because of their death-dealing potential, but because they or their treatment hits us "where we live." B...

How are drugs used to fight breast cancer? Doctors use certain medications to help prevent breast cancer or, in combination with other therapies, to fight it and treat it. The kinds of drugs you'll take depend on what stage your cancer has reached, whether it responds to hormones like estrogen, whether you're resistant to any medications or treatments, and how well you tolerate the ones prescribe...

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States (other than skin cancer). And while it takes over 40,000 lives in the U.S. each year, it isn't the deadliest cancer. (Lung cancer is). But when it comes to inspiring fear, breast cancer is in a class by itself. As is often the case with diseases, much of the fear springs from misunderstanding. How much do you know about breast c...

You may think of flax as a source of fine linens, but the plant's greatest value may well lie in its small, dark seeds. As far back as the 700s, King Charlemagne ordered every loyal Roman to eat flaxseed for health, and today many alternative medicine gurus echo that decree to all who will listen. Flaxseed is more than just nutritious -- health experts believe the seed can actually help prevent he...

Show All Wellness Library Results