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Results for search "Media".

15 Nov

Is Social Media Harmful to the Well-Being of Young Adults?

There may be significant benefits to limiting social media use.

06 Apr

Toddlers on Touchscreens

Computer gaming is not inherently bad for young children, study finds.

Health News Results - 60

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents often worry that violent movies can trigger violence in their kids, but a new study suggests PG-13-rated movies won't turn your kids into criminals.

Researchers found that as PG-13 movies became more violent between 1985 and 2015, overall rates of murder and violence actually fell.

"It doesn't appear that PG-13-rated movies ...

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cereal TV ads aimed at young children put them at increased risk for obesity and cancer, researchers warn.

A poor diet, including too much sugar, can lead to obesity, a known risk factor for 13 cancers.

"One factor believed to contribute to children's poor quality diets is the marketing of nutritionally poor foods directly to childr...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Late-night tweeting leads to poorer next-day performance by professional basketball players, according to a new study that highlights how social media can affect sleep.

For the study, researchers examined statistics for games played between 2009 and 2016 by 112 National Basketball Association players who were verified Twitter users.

...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For the billions of young people who seek community and connection on social media, new research warns their search may be in vain.

Instead, spending too much time on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may actually increase the risk of depression and loneliness.

So concludes a small analysis that tracked the impact such sites had on...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Shootings make the headlines, yet the American public doesn't know that guns take more lives by suicide than by homicide, a new study reveals.

In the United States, suicide is twice as common as murder, and suicide by firearm is more common than homicide by firearm, the researchers reported.

However, the new "research indicates that ...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're worried that too much "screen time" could be sapping your child's intelligence, new research suggests you might be right.

Kids with the sharpest intellects spent less than two hours a day on their cellphones, tablets and computers, coupled with 9 to 11 hours of sleep and at least an hour of physical activity, the study found.

...

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Play is a child's most important work, preschool teachers like to say, and a new American Academy of Pediatrics report wholeheartedly agrees.

Play is a crucial way for kids to develop social and mental skills, head off stress and build a healthy bond with parents, the child health experts say.

"We're recommending that doctors write ...

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Keeping that smartphone handy while out with friends may backfire: The pull of digital technology is distracting and drains enjoyment out of face-to-face interactions, new research suggests.

A pair of studies focused on cellphone use showed those who keep their phones easily accessible while eating out feel more preoccupied and bored -- and en...

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sexting can lead to dissing.

That appears to be one takeaway from a small survey of North American adults in committed relationships who share explicit visuals and/or texts via mobile phones with each other.

While the survey suggests that some couples who engage in sexting do see improvements in their real-world sex life, the virtual...

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Photo-editing tools that make people look more perfect online than in real life may be a health threat, medical experts warn.

The tidal wave of altered photos on social media is changing perceptions of beauty. And that can trigger a preoccupation with appearance that leads to risky efforts to hide perceived flaws, researchers suggest. Those ef...

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, making it more likely they'll become overweight or obese, a new review claims.

The average 8- to 18-year-old spends more than seven hours a day fixated on a screen, whether it's a computer, smartphone, tablet, video game or TV, the latest evidence shows.

Teenagers who exceed t...

MONDAY, July 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- News reports on suicides may be quickly followed by a bump in suicide rates -- especially if they contain details that sensationalize the tragedy, a new study finds.

The research adds to evidence of a phenomenon known as "suicide contagion." It happens when vulnerable people identify with a person who died by suicide, and then see that route a...

FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- College students might want to leave their smartphones and tablets behind when they head to a lecture, new research suggests.

Otherwise, the distraction might translate into a lower grade on the final exam.

For the study, researchers followed 118 cognitive psychology students at Rutgers University in New Jersey. For one term, electro...

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who take refuge in their smartphones when their kids throw a tantrum may, in the long run, make matters worse, a new study suggests.

The study, of 183 couples with young children, found that stressed-out parents often turned to their electronic devices when dealing with their kids. And when that was a pattern, their kids' behavior t...

THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Unsettling experiences on social media may leave you feeling more than just anti-social -- they might raise your risk for depression, new research suggests.

Curiously, the reverse doesn't seem to be true. The survey of nearly 1,200 college students indicated that a positive online exchange only marginally reduced depression risk.

...

FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Are tablets, smartphones and laptops robbing Americans of shut-eye? Absolutely, said researchers who found that the unending entertainments and the light the devices emit are a powerful, slumber-killing combo.

The finding comes from a small analysis of nine otherwise healthy adults in their 20s. Their sleep was tracked after five straight nigh...

THURSDAY, May 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who watch more medical marijuana ads are more likely to smoke pot themselves, new research indicates.

"Our findings suggest that increased exposure to medical marijuana advertising is associated with increased marijuana use and related negative consequences throughout adolescence," said study lead author Elizabeth D'Amico, of the RAND C...

MONDAY, May 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents are more likely to let their kids see violent PG-13 movies if they feel the mayhem is "justified," a new study suggests.

The study, of 610 U.S. parents, found that moms and dads were less disturbed by gun violence in PG-13 movies when they deemed it justified. That included the typical action-movie scenario where a hero defends others f...

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest may not be good for women's self-esteem, a new study suggests.

Women are less likely to be happy with their bodies if they spend more than an hour a day on social media, the findings showed.

These women tend to think thin people are more attractive, and may be more self-conscious about how they themse...

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past decade, smartphones and social media have blanketed the planet like a technological tsunami.

The result is that nearly 70 million new photos and 5 billion new posts are uploaded to Instagram and Facebook every day, respectively.

But a new study suggests that constantly sharing the moments of your life online may underm...

WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's little doubt that the last presidential election sparked a host of emotions among Americans. But new research suggests it might also have triggered obsessive-compulsive behaviors in Democrats and Republicans alike.

"The idea for our study came about while I was taking a break from a group project. During the break, everyone pulled ...

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Far from trying to keep kids fit and trim, America's biggest sports leagues are actually pushing junk food at them, a new study contends.

Multimillion dollar "sponsorships" forged between professional sports organizations -- like the National Football League -- and food companies often end up marketing high-calorie foods and sugary beverages ...

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Violence followed Donald Trump during his presidential campaign, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed police data for 31 Trump rallies in 22 cities and 38 Hillary Clinton rallies in 21 cities in 2016. All of the cities had populations of more than 200,000.

On days when Trump rallies were held, cities had 2.3 more assaults than av...

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Amid growing concerns about the impact of "fake news," a new study finds that false stories take off much faster than truth on Twitter.

The study, of news and rumors shared by 3 million Twitter users, found that false information spreads more quickly and further than accurate information.

Falsities were about 70 percent more likely...

THURSDAY, March 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're out for a good time, think twice about pulling out your smartphone.

Smartphones can making dining out less appetizing, a recent study revealed. And a second experiment found that people get less pleasure from face-to-face socializing if they are using their mobile device.

The findings add to growing research into how smar...

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hours spent binge-watching that hot new series might feel great, but it's doing no favors for your blood vessels, new research shows.

The study found that people who spend too much time in front of the TV are at increased risk for blood clots in their veins -- a condition called venous thromboembolism (VTE).

These clots, which oft...

THURSDAY, Jan. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most American teenagers are plagued by too little sleep, which can hurt their health and their school performance, federal health officials said Thursday.

Nearly 58 percent of middle school students in nine states and almost 73 percent of high school students across the country don't get the recommended amount of nightly shuteye, according t...

MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who are glued to their smartphones and other devices are unhappier than those who spend less time on digital media, new research finds.

The study can't prove cause-and-effect, so it's not clear if teens are made unhappy by spending a long time on their devices, or whether less happy teens are simply drawn to using them more.

Bu...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You don't have to be famous for your public health message to reach millions.

A new case study describes how Tawny Dzierzek, a young nurse from Kentucky, posted a startling selfie on social media in April 2015, shortly after she had a skin cancer treatment.

Dzierzek was a regular user of tanning beds in her youth. She was diagnose...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's no secret that we love our smartphones and other electronic devices for staying connected.

Perhaps too much.

According to one study on cellphone use by a mobile security company, 63 percent of women and 73 percent of men between the ages of 18 to 34 can't go even one hour without checking their phones.

And research ...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It strikes no one as surprising when someone like Beyonce graces the cover of a magazine as an icon of beauty, but a new study suggests that was far more rare three decades ago.

If People magazine is any indication, America's definition of who's "beautiful" has broadened to include more races and a wider span of ages.

"This...

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all children in the United States face traumatic experiences that can radically alter the course of their lives, research shows.

But Big Bird, Elmo and Cookie Monster are now joining the effort to help these kids.

A new program launched by Sesame Workshop aims to help youngsters cope with natural disasters like Hurrican...

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who see gun violence in movies are more likely to play with and fire a gun if they have access to one, a new study finds.

"We know from past research that kids who see movie characters smoke cigarettes are more likely to smoke them themselves, and kids who see movie characters drink alcohol are more likely to drink alcohol themselves," ...

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If kids only watched YouTube for insights into drinking, they'd get a very slanted view, new research shows.

The study found alcohol intake is typically shown only as fun, with none of the downsides.

Researchers analyzed 137 YouTube videos that featured alcohol brands popular with underage drinkers. The videos had been viewed near...

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Take with a grain of salt any flashy reports from clinical trials boasting groundbreaking results, a new scientific review warns.

A majority of clinical trials published in medical journals hype their findings, presenting them in a way that makes them look more favorable than they actually are, said senior researcher Lisa Bero.

An...

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Binge-watch a full season of your favorite television series and a night of bad sleep is bound to follow, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a new survey that looked at TV viewing habits and sleep histories among more than 420 people between the ages of 18 and 25.

"Our research indicates that regular TV viewing -- switch...

TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The photos you post on Instagram can contain telltale visual clues that help predict if you're suffering from depression, a new study reports.

Computer software designed to scan photos for these hidden signals accurately diagnosed people with depression seven out of 10 times, said lead researcher Andrew Reece. He's a graduate student with the ...

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many people with diabetes experiment with placement of their continuous glucose monitors and get good results, a new study finds.

A continuous glucose monitor is a sensor inserted under the skin that tracks blood sugar levels. People with type 1 diabetes -- and some with type 2 diabetes -- can use this near-constant stream of information to ma...

FRIDAY, Aug. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An app that uses familiar game elements could help college students get higher grades and keep them from dropping a course, a new study suggests.

The app includes game elements such as "leaderboards" and digital badges, and lets professors send course quizzes directly to students' electronic devices.

Researchers tested the app on 394 ...

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After the release of the controversial Netflix series "13 Reasons Why" -- a show that depicts the suicide of a fictional teenager -- there were surges in the number of Google searches using the term "suicide," a new analysis reveals.

Specifically, searches that included the word "suicide" jumped 19 percent over a 19-day period after the serie...

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Progress to keep tobacco use out of kid-friendly movies is apparently going up in smoke.

The number of youth-focused films that showed smoking rose sharply between 2010 and 2016, a new study reveals.

During that time, 46 percent of movies with smoking were youth-rated. That's 210 of the 459 top-grossing films. And the number of sm...

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Today's U.S. opioid epidemic is rooted in a 1980 letter to a medical journal that played down the potential for painkiller addiction, a new report states.

The 101-word letter, written by Boston University Medical Center researchers, asserted that "despite widespread use of narcotic drugs in hospitals, the development of addiction is rare in ...

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Soon after actor Charlie Sheen revealed his HIV-positive status back in late 2015, rates of at-home testing for the virus shot up to record levels, a new report shows.

The study follows on 2016 research that found the the Internet was abuzz with millions more searches for HIV-related topics after the former "Two and a Half Men" star made the ...

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It started as a bestselling novel aimed at teens.

In 2007, Thirteen Reasons Why, by first-time novelist Jay Asher, outlined the story of a 16-year-old named Hannah Baker. In the book, Hannah recounts -- from beyond the grave -- the high school gossip, humiliation, bullying, invasion of privacy, betrayal and sexual assault that led her t...

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol marketing in movies increased significantly over the past two decades, especially in popular children's films, researchers report.

Dartmouth's Dr. James Sargent isn't happy about that.

"Children and young people look to movie stars as role models," said study co-author Sargent, a professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth School o...

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A half-century into its run as an iconic staple of children's television, "Sesame Street" will introduce a character with autism to its world-famous neighborhood.

The new Muppet, a 4-year-old girl named Julia, makes her debut on the show on Monday in a special episode, "Meet Julia." It's slated to air simultaneously on both HBO and PBS.

...

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Movie villains often have a "look," and it's not a good one, a new study reports.

Scary, evil characters in films tend to have certain types of less-than-attractive facial features -- bulbous noses, warts and scars among them, the researchers said.

But while these nasty personalities are fictional, the way they look could have rea...

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Trying to stay slim? Start by switching off your TV during meal time.

Of course, just turning off the television won't make pounds melt away. But new research suggests that not watching TV at dinnertime seems to reduce the risk of obesity in adults. Eating home-cooked meals is also linked to a lower risk of obesity, the researchers said.

...

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's spreading via social media: A "dare" where kids use erasers to rub away the skin on their arms, often while reciting the alphabet or other phrases.

Players compare the resulting injuries, and the most injured player is the "winner."

The so-called "eraser challenge" has been circulating for about a year -- but it's no joke, ...

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who get too much screen time may be more likely to have risk factors that increase their chances of type 2 diabetes, new research says.

Watching television, playing video games or sitting in front of a computer or other device for more than three hours each day was linked to more body fat and insulin resistance. Those factors mean the b...

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