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Results for search "Sunscreens / Lotions".

22 May

Using Homemade Sunscreen Risky

Homemade sunscreen offers very little protection from the sun's damaging UV rays.

08 Apr

Another Important Reason to Use Sunscreen

Sunscreen may protect the skin's blood vessels.

Health News Results - 29

The chemicals in sunscreens help shield people from the sun's rays, but they are also absorbed into the body at levels that raise some safety questions, a new study confirms.

The study, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is a follow-up to a 2019 investigation. Both reached the same conclusion: The active ingredients in popular sunscreens can be absorbed into the blood at ...

While 6 in 10 Americans say they're concerned about developing cancer, only 1 in 4 make cancer prevention part of their daily lives, a new online survey reveals.

Roughly a quarter think there's nothing they can do to prevent it. But the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) says as many of half of cancer cases are preventable.

"Tobacco use, diet, sun exposure, alcohol...

Is the sunscreen you slather on your body marketed as safe for coral reefs? New research suggests those claims may not be entirely true.

Trace metals and other compounds in many sunscreens have unknown effects on marine ecology, say researchers studying Mediterranean waters.

Previous studies have shown that ultraviolet-screening ingredients in sunscreens can harm coral and o...

Don't invite skin cancer to your holiday weekend.

As you celebrate America's independence at beaches, pools or backyard parties, remember that the sun's damaging rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. -- and protecting yourself is a must.

"When it comes to sunscreen, people in general don't put on enough, and they don't put it on as often as they should," said Dr. William...

When all else fails, fear may motivate people to protect themselves from the sun.

Researchers found that a photo of a mole being removed and visuals of skin damage did the trick.

Study volunteers were shown photos taken using a VISIA UV camera system. These images spotlight skin damage from the sun's ultraviolet rays that is normally invisible to the naked eye.

"T...

Whether you're at the beach, the park or a pool this summer, be sure to protect your skin from the sun's damaging rays.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, and most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Fortunately, everyone can take action to protect their s...

Interest in homemade sunscreens is hot, but many of these do-it-yourself brews lack effective sun protection, a new study warns.

Researchers found that only about one-third of homemade sunscreens on the popular information-sharing website Pinterest specified how much sun protection factor (SPF) each "natural" sunblock contained. In some cases, SPF content dipped as low as 2 -- far bel...

The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn't concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game.

"I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape," recalls Langill, 33. Thinking it might be a hernia, she went to the doctor.

Within days, Langill was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma -- an advanced stage of the mos...

Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found.

Those who don't practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, despite being one of the most preventable cancers.

One in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer a...

For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects.

Bloodstream levels of four sunscreen chemicals increased dramatically after test subjects applied spray, lotion and cream...

As you dig into gardening this spring, be sure you don't plant the seeds of skin problems, an expert advises.

"Adverse skin reactions from gardening are very common and may include bug bites and stings, plant-induced rashes, and cuts and infections," said Dr. Sonya Kenkare, a dermatologist in Evergreen Park, Ill.

"While most of these can be easily treated, some can be serio...

Sunscreen may do double duty when you're outside on a summer day, keeping you cool as it protects your skin from the sun's harmful rays.

New research suggests how: When unprotected skin is exposed to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, skin cells typically see a drop in levels of nitric oxide. This compound helps the skin's small blood vessels to relax and widen.

Reduced nitric...

Even though many moisturizers now contain sunscreens, people may not put them on their faces as carefully as they do sunscreen lotions, new research suggests.

"Moisturizer is not as well applied as sunscreen," said lead author Kevin Hamill, a lecturer in eye and vision science at the University of Liverpool in England.

"Therefore, if planning prolonged sun exposure, we advis...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to tighten regulation of over-the-counter sunscreen products.

Included in the proposed rule are updates on sunscreen safety, sun protection factor (SPF) requirements, and the effectiveness of insect repellent/sunscreen combinations.

"The proposed rule that we issued today would update regulatory requirements for most ...

A new mint-sized, battery-free patch that alerts wearers to potentially harmful sunlight exposure in real time might become a powerful weapon in preventing skin cancer.

Powered by the sun while designed to measure its rays, the patch automatically transmits sun readings to a user's smartphone. It works wet or dry, is fully reusable, and weighs next to nothing.

"In the U.S., ...

Melanoma skin cancer death rates in men are on the rise in most countries, but are stable or declining for women in some, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed World Health Organization data from 33 countries between 1985 and 2015. Melanoma death rates in men were increasing in all but one nation.

In all 33 countries, melanoma death rates were higher for men than fo...

Sunscreen washing off swimmers may pose a threat to fish and other aquatic life, a new study suggests.

Ultraviolet (UV) filters have been added to many personal care products, including sunscreens, moisturizers and makeup. And swimmers, in particular, are advised to reapply sunscreen often or risk a painful and potentially harmful sunburn.

But scientists have now begun to qu...

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many people apply sunscreen too thinly, and that could mean far less sun protection than they hoped for, new research shows.

So, it might be a good idea to use sunscreens with a higher sun-protection factor (SPF) to begin with, the British researchers advised.

"What this research shows is that the way sunscreen is applied plays a...

Stick or spray-on sunscreens are essential tools against skin cancer, but it's important to use them the right way, a dermatologist says.

"Sticks are easy for under the eyes and the backs of the hands, while spray sunscreens are often easier to apply on children," Dr. Debra Wattenberg said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release.

"However, it's important to take p...

It's often said salt water is good for cuts. Or that sunscreen isn't needed on cloudy days.

But both are incorrect, says Isabel Valdez, a physician assistant and instructor of family medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

When you head outdoors this summer, you should be aware of some common health myths, she noted.

"Salt water from the beach can actual...

If you could protect yourself from cancer, you'd do it, right? Yet most Americans still aren't taking the easiest step to prevent the most commonly diagnosed type -- skin cancer, which will affect one in five people at some point in their lives.

Only 14 percent of American men and 30 percent of women regularly use sunscreen when outside for more than an hour, according to a report fro...

Summertime means fun time, but you still need to follow some basic health and safety precautions.

Dehydration is a common summer problem and often results in dizziness, dry mouth and lightheadedness. But it also can be more severe, according to Dr. Ravi Rao, a family medicine physician at Penn State's medical center.

Mild dehydration can be corrected by drinking water or oth...

Summer sun brings childhood fun, but experts warn it also brings skin cancer dangers, even for kids.

"Don't assume children cannot get skin cancer because of their age," said Dr. Alberto Pappo, director of the solid tumor division at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. "Unlike other cancers, the conventional melanoma that we see mostly in adolescents behaves the sa...

For U.S. military personnel, deployment carries many dangers. And besides the well-known threats they face, these men and women are also at a higher-than-average risk for skin cancer, including potentially deadly melanoma, a new research review suggests.

Two military groups face a particularly high risk: white service members and men over 50, according to the report.

"From ...

If you think popping a pill will somehow keep your skin safe while you tan, think again.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday issued warning letters to companies marketing supplements that they claim will counter the effects of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

"We've found products purporting to provide protection from the sun that aren't delivering the a...

Many millennials and young people continue to tan, despite warnings about the link between excess sun exposure and skin cancer, new research warns.

Some are poorly informed about the potential harms of bronzed or burned skin. Others overlook safety concerns, often driven by low self-esteem or narcissism, said study lead author Amy Watson.

Many young people make tanning decis...

Doctors should start early with skin cancer prevention advice when their patients are light-skinned, suggests new guidelines that bump that starting point back to the age of 6 months.

This recommendation, from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, updates a 2012 recommendation that advised doctors not begin this education until children reached the age of 10.

"Clinicians...

It looks like public health efforts to warn younger Americans about the dangers of tanning beds and sun exposure are paying off.

Rates of the deadly skin cancer known as melanoma have dropped among Americans aged 15 to 44, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

Unfortunately, baby boomers who baked themselves in baby oil during their ...

You don't have to be famous for your public health message to reach millions.

A new case study describes how Tawny Dzierzek, a young nurse from Kentucky, posted a startling selfie on social media in April 2015, shortly after she had a skin cancer treatment.

Dzierzek was a regular user of tanning beds in her youth. She was diagnosed with skin cancer at age 21. By the time she...

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