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16 Oct

Fewer Than 1% Of Dentists Nationwide Have Tested Positive For COVID-19

That's far below infection rates among other healthcare professionals, according to the authors.

Health News Results - 38

Dental Practices Rebound as U.S. Dentists Look Forward to COVID Vaccine

The coronavirus pandemic hit dental practices hard early in 2020, as COVID-19 fears kept millions of Americans from seeking routine oral health care.

But as dental offices have ratcheted up their safety measures, more patients have steadily been returning for checkups and more, according to recent polls conducted by the American Dental Association Health Policy Institute (HPI).

In...

Many Dentists Face Aggressive Patients at Work

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2020 (Healthday News) -- Health care workers commonly experience aggression and violence at work, second only to law enforcement.

That fact may bring to mind emergency room scenes in television dramas, but a new study of 98 New York City metro area dentists found that they, too, experience high numbers of both physical and verbal aggression.

The study, published in ...

Don't Overdo the Halloween Candy, or Your Smile May Suffer

SUNDAY, Oct. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) - - COVID-19 may change the look of Halloween this year, but dressing up and indulging in some sweets is all part of the fun, even if your kids can't go door to door.

And experts say one night of eating candy won't have a big effect on your teeth if it's done in moderation.

"It is all about having self-control or parental control," sa...

Older Patients at Risk When Dentists Prescribe Opioids

Seniors who take depression and anxiety drugs shouldn't be prescribed opioid painkillers by their dentist because it puts them at increased risk for problems, researchers warn.

They analyzed 2011-15 dental and medical data for 40,800 patients aged 65 and older across the United States. There were 947 emergency room visits and hospitalizations in the 30 days after a dental visit.

...

COVID Bites: Cracked Teeth Another Coronavirus Scourge

Dentists are drilling down on another worrying trend related to the coronavirus: more cracked teeth.

Like sleepless nights and stomach jitters, teeth grinding is a telltale sign of stress. And the habit -- which can damage and break your choppers -- is sending people to dental offices in growing numbers amid the coronavirus pandemic.

"I have been seeing a lot of broken teet...

Don't Delay Dental Visits During Pandemic

Visiting your dentist during the coronavirus pandemic poses little risk, an expert says.

Dentists have taken measures to protect patients, but some people are still reluctant to get dental care, said Dr. Cecile Feldman, dean of Rutgers University's School of Dental Medicine in New Jersey.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines for re-opening in...

Fluoridated Water Protects Baby Teeth, Too

Fluoride in drinking water reduces the odds for severe cavities in baby teeth, researchers from New Zealand report.

Although fluoridated toothpaste is widely available, fluoridated water continues to show a benefit in reducing cavities, said Dr. Howard Pollick, a health sciences clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry.

"Communit...

Dental Groups Push Back on WHO's Call to Delay Routine Care

The World Health Organization recommended postponing routine dental care during the coronavirus pandemic, but the American Dental Association (ADA) strongly disagrees.

"Oral health is integral to overall health. Dentistry is essential health care," said ADA President Dr. Chad Gehani. "Dentistry is essential health care because of its role in evaluating, diagnosing, preventing or trea...

Keep Flossing: Study Ties Gum Disease to Higher Cancer Risk

Want to avoid cancer? Consider brushing and flossing more often.

Why? Folks with bad gums might be at higher risk of developing certain types of cancer, new research suggests.

A history of gum disease appears to increase the risk of stomach cancer by 52% and throat cancer by 43%, according to data from two major long-term health studies.

People who'd lost t...

In the COVID Era, Dental Appointments Won't  Be the Same

Dental offices responded to COVID-19 lockdowns in much the same way as other medical professions, halting routine visits and only providing emergency care to patients in dire need.

But now that stay-at-home orders are lifting, many dentists are reopening, but with new protocols to limit infection.

Your dental appointment will not be the same, with changes from the waiting room t...

Vaping Could Put You at Risk for Gum Disease

E-cigarettes can damage more than your lungs: New research shows that only a few months of vaping might also trigger gum disease.

"Vaping is such a big assault on the oral environment, and the change happens dramatically and over a short period of time," said study senior author Dr. Purnima Kumar, a professor of periodontology at Ohio State University.

She and her team colle...

Turning to Wine During Lockdown? Here's How to Protect Your Teeth

Weathering the coronavirus pandemic might include imbibing a few glasses of red wine on occasion, but one expert says you don't have to wind up with stained teeth because of it.

"The strength of your enamel and how prone you are to plaque buildup is key to how much your teeth might stain," said Dr. Uchenna Akosa, head of Rutgers Health University Dental Associates, the faculty practic...

What Dental Offices Are Doing to Prevent Coronavirus Infection?

Dentists, hygienists and other dental professionals are at high risk for work-related exposure to coronavirus, but they can take steps to protect themselves.

"We have really good ways to prescreen patients: by taking their temperature, asking them questions regarding travel in the last two weeks, asking how they're feeling and if they have flu-like symptoms," said Dr. Fotinos Panagako...

Your Teeth Are a Permanent Archive of Your Life: Study

Your teeth provide a detailed account of your life, much as a tree's rings record its history, a groundbreaking study shows.

"A tooth is not a static and dead portion of the skeleton. It continuously adjusts and responds to physiological processes," said lead study author Paola Cerrito, a doctoral candidate studying anthropology and dentistry at New York University (NYU) in New York ...

After Tooth Pull, Opioids Don't Relieve Pain Better Than Other Meds: Study

Opioids are no better than other meds at quelling the pain of a pulled tooth, a new study finds, suggesting it may be possible to significantly reduce their use in dentistry.

University of Michigan researchers asked more than 325 people who had teeth pulled to rate their pain and satisfaction within six months of their extraction.

About half of those who had surgical extract...

Want to Help Keep Diabetes at Bay? Brush & Floss

There's a new, unexpected reason to keep your pearly whites gleaming: avoiding diabetes.

New research found that people who regularly brush their teeth three times a day reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes.

The study also found that people who have dental disease or a lot of missing teeth have a higher risk of developing the blood sugar condition.

"Our study su...

Another Vaping Hazard: Less-Healthy Mouths

Your lungs might not be your only concern if you're trying electronic cigarettes -- your mouth may pay the price, too.

Vaping alters the natural bacteria found in the mouth, leaving you more vulnerable to oral infections and inflammation, a new study reports.

The researchers said this study is the first to show that vaping can alter the natural balance of beneficial bacteri...

Too Many Antibiotics, Opioids Given to Dental Patients in the ER

Too many patients who go to U.S. emergency rooms for dental problems are prescribed antibiotics and opioid painkillers, a new study claims.

The findings show the need for continued efforts to combat both opioid abuse and overuse of antibiotics, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers said.

For the study, the investigators analyzed 2012 to 2014 data an...

Will Brushing and Flossing Protect You Against Stroke?

Gum disease may be linked to higher rates of stroke caused by hardened and severely blocked arteries, preliminary research findings indicate.

Two unpublished studies suggest that treating gum disease alongside other stroke risk factors might help prevent stroke by reducing the buildup of plaque in arteries and narrowing of blood vessels in the brain. However, the studies do not prove...

Dentists Among Top Prescribers of Opioids

American dentists often prescribe more than the recommended supply of opioid painkillers to patients, a new study finds.

Not only that, they are more likely to prescribe more powerful opioids, the researchers found.

In this study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 550,000 dental visits by adult patients between 2011 and 2015, before U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

Cleaner Teeth, Healthier Heart?

Brushing your teeth may be good for your heart, a new study suggests.

It included more than 161,000 South Korean adults, ages 40 to 79, with no history of heart failure or the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation.

Between 2003 and 2004, participants had a routine medical exam and were asked about a wide range of lifestyle habits, including ho...

Antibiotics Not Recommended for Most Toothaches, New Guideline Says

Antibiotics aren't necessary for most toothaches, a new American Dental Association (ADA) guideline says.

It's common for doctors and dentists to prescribe antibiotics to ease toothache symptoms and prevent a more serious condition.

But a review that led to the new guideline concluded that antibiotics are not the best option for adults with a toothache. Instead, they should ...

Fewer Teeth, Higher Risk of Heart Disease?

Losing teeth may be associated with higher risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers studied nearly 317,000 Americans between 40 and 79 years of age. They found that 28% of those who had lost all their teeth to gum disease also had heart problems, compared with 7% of those who kept all their teeth.

The researchers found that people with some missing ...

Gum Disease Might Raise Your Blood Pressure

Here's a compelling reason to keep those dreaded appointments with your dentist: New research suggests that red, tender or bleeding gums could trigger high blood pressure.

In a review of 81 studies that included more than 250,000 people, U.K. scientists found that those who had moderate to severe gum disease (periodontitis) had a 22% increased risk for high blood pressure, and tho...

4 Personal Items You Probably Should Replace Today

Is your toothbrush more than four months old? And how about your contact lens case? These and other everyday essentials need regular replacing, no matter how comfortable you are with them.

At the top of the list is your toothbrush. To benefit oral health, your toothbrush needs to be in tiptop form. The American Dental Association suggests replacing it as soon as bristles start to fray...

Perfect Teeth Won't Guarantee a Perfect Life

Braces won't suddenly give you more confidence, even if they give you a winning smile, Australian researchers say.

They came to that conclusion after following nearly 500 young people in Australia from age 13 to 30. More than a third had braces between 1988 and 2006.

To gauge the effect of straight teeth on happiness, researchers looked at how people dealt with new or hard c...

Dentists Prescribe Antibiotics Far Too Often: Study

Dentists tend to be overeager when it comes to prescribing antibiotics, new research suggests.

The study authors found that antibiotics prescribed to prevent infection during dental procedures weren't necessary 81% of the time. That's important because 10% of all antibiotic prescriptions come from dentists, the researchers said.

"Preventive antibiotics in these patie...

Opioid Prescriptions to Teens, Young Adults Still Common

Even amid an epidemic of abuse, opioid painkillers are still commonly prescribed to teenagers and young adults for conditions like tooth and back pain, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2005 and 2015, opioids were prescribed to teens and college-age adults at nearly 57 million visits to doctors' offices and emergency departments in the United States.

It was p...

U.S. Dentists Prescribe 37 Times More Opioids Than in England: Study

Despite the nation's opioid epidemic, U.S. dentists are far more likely to prescribe addictive opioid painkillers than their British counterparts, a new study reveals.

In 2016, American dentists wrote 37 times as many opioid prescriptions as British dentists: 1.4 million versus 28,000.

And while 22% of all prescriptions from American dentists were for opioids, th...

AHA News: Mouth Bacteria Found in Stroke Patients' Brains

Bacteria commonly seen in the mouth has been found in the brains of people who have had a stroke, a new study shows.

The Finnish research group behind the new findings has been studying a possible association between bacterial infections and cardiovascular disease for more than 10 years. Their study, published May 23 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked for...

Fear of Dentist May Start Early for Minority Kids -- With Good Reason

Not many children like going to the dentist, but minority kids may have some legitimate complaints, researchers suggest.

A new study finds that poor kids, and Hispanic and Asian children, may be more likely to have bad experiences during dental visits than whites and those from wealthier families, a new study finds.

In many cases, the child was physically restrained, separat...

Those Whitening Strips May Damage Your Teeth

Having a pearly white smile may come with a significant cost -- the health of your teeth.

New research suggests that over-the-counter whitening strips may be eroding the structure of your choppers.

"This study shows that there is a loss of protein from the teeth with these whitening treatments," said senior author Kelly Keenan, an associate professor of chemistry at Stockt...

Gum Disease Shows Possible Links to Alzheimer's

Regular brushing and flossing can save your teeth into old age.

Could it also save your brain?

The bacteria involved in gum disease might play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.

DNA from the bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is more often found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients, said lead r...

Wider Waistlines, Smaller Brains?

Obese people tend to show shrinkage in their brain tissue by middle age -- especially if the extra pounds are concentrated in the belly, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 9,600 U.K. adults, found that those who were obese typically had a lower volume of gray matter in the brain than their normal-weight counterparts. Gray matter contains most of the brain's nerve cells -- w...

Even Wisdom Tooth Removal May Spur Opioid Addiction

Teens and young adults who are prescribed opioid painkillers after having their wisdom teeth removed are at increased risk for addiction, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers looked at nearly 15,000 patients, aged 16 to 25, who were prescribed opioids (such as Vicodin or Lortab) after wisdom tooth extraction in 2015. The median number of pills prescribed was 20; half got ...

AHA: Poor Teeth-Brushing Habits Tied to Higher Heart Risk

Brushing your teeth twice a day for at least two minutes may lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests.

Previous studies have found a link between heart disease and periodontal disease -- a condition marked by gum infection, gum inflammation and tooth damage.

The new study, scheduled for presentation Saturday at the American Heart Association's Scienti...

Gum Disease May Worsen Blood Pressure Problems

Gum disease may interfere with high blood pressure control, a new study suggests.

Researchers reviewed medical and dental records of more than 3,600 people diagnosed with high blood pressure.

Compared to people with good oral health, those with gum disease were less likely to respond to high blood pressure medications and 20 percent less likely to achieve healthy blood press...

Smoking Seems to Weaken the Immune System: Study

The list of health risks linked to smoking continues to grow.

A small study reports that, aside from lung cancer, emphysema and heart disease, cigarette smokers also have weakened immune systems affecting their dental health.

Scientists from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine found that smoking reduces the ability of pulp inside teeth to fight illnes...

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