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Some Breast Surgery Won't Harm Ability to Breastfeed

Having surgery for benign breast conditions won't harm a woman's future ability to breastfeed, new research suggests.

The study included 85 women, aged 18 to 45. Fifteen had a prior history of benign breast conditions, including cysts, benign tumors and enlarged breasts. Sixteen had had breast surgery, including breast augmentation, reduction mammoplasty and biopsy.

Whether ...

Super-Cooled Injections Might Ice Away 'Deep Fat'

The Harvard-associated lab that created the "CoolSculpting" process of reducing fat says it's on the trail of the next advance in nonsurgical slimming.

CoolSculpting freezes fat cells by applying an ice-cold gel pad to the skin, causing cells to die off and either be flushed away or absorbed by the body, said lead researcher Dr. Lilit Garibyan, an investigator at the Wellman Center for ...

'Nerve-Release' Surgery Helped Ease One Man's Tough Migraines

Chronic migraine headaches plagued Adam Pressley from childhood, and by his 30s they had become a near-daily occurrence.

Pressley, 31, had tried everything to stop them: blood pressure drugs, antidepressants, seizure medications, and even quarterly injections of Botox.

Then his doctor suggested something surprising, saying plastic surgery could potentially relieve nerve pres...

Prior Pregnancies May Affect Your Tummy Tuck

The success of your tummy tuck may depend on whether you've borne children, a new study suggests.

Pregnancy-related widening and thinning of the belly muscles may reduce the effectiveness of tummy tuck (abdominoplasty) surgery, researchers found. This is especially true in women who've had multiple pregnancies.

But Dr. Gregory Dumanian and colleagues at Northwestern Memoria...

Plastic Surgery Pays Off for Men

Plastic surgery is no longer the sole domain of women, and men now have even more incentive to try a little nip-and-tuck on their faces: New research suggests they look more attractive and trustworthy to others.

The study included 24 men, average age 49 years, who had one or more of the following procedures: upper eyelid lift, reduction of lower eyelids, face-lift, brow-lift, neck-lif...

Selfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: Study

You might be more apt to seek out a face-lift, a new nose, hair implants or a boob job if you're a fan of posting selfies on social media, a new study reports.

Adults who regularly use social media are more likely to consider getting plastic surgery to improve their online appearance, particularly if they prefer photo-heavy sites and apps, the researchers found.

Furthermore,...

Lonely Baby Boomers Driving Surge in Plastic Surgery

Face-lifts and hair transplants. Chin implants and forehead lifts and lip augmentation.

Baby boomers hoping to retain their youth -- and maybe get back into the dating scene -- are seeking plastic surgery in ever-increasing numbers, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Nearly 50,000 more cosmetic procedures were performed on Americans 55 and older in 2018 than ...

If You're Considering Cosmetic Surgery…

More than 17 million cosmetic procedures are performed in the United States each year. Most of these are minimally invasive, designed to improve your appearance in subtle ways without the surgery, stitches and long healing time of early facelifts, once the only rejuvenating option available.

Today's most popular procedures are:

  • Botox injections to soften lines, with mor...

Surgeons Recommend Fewer Opioid Pills After Nose Jobs

Many patients who have nose surgery use far fewer opioid painkillers than they're given, evidence that doctors are overprescribing the highly addictive drugs, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers reviewed 173 nose surgery (rhinoplasty) cases performed at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. Of those, 168 patients were prescribed opioids (such as OxyContin) along with acet...

Snap, Polish, Post: Why Selfies May Be Bad for Your Health

Photo-editing tools that make people look more perfect online than in real life may be a health threat, medical experts warn.

The tidal wave of altered photos on social media is changing perceptions of beauty. And that can trigger a preoccupation with appearance that leads to risky efforts to hide perceived flaws, researchers suggest. Those efforts include behaviors like skin altering...