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Worried about what damage the polluted air outside might pose to your health during your work commute? New research suggests you might want to worry more about the chemicals you are exposed to inside your car.

Benzene and formaldehyde are used in automobile manufacturing, and both are known to cause cancer at or above certain levels of exposure. Benzene also poses a risk of repro...

Nearly half -- 43% -- of all fatal car crashes involving teens and their passengers are the result of speeding, a new automobile safety report reveals.

The finding stems from an in-depth analysis of all fatal motor vehicle accidents across the United States between 2015 and 2019. During this five-year period, 4,930 teen drivers and passengers died in crashes involving speeding.

And ...

As more infectious coronavirus variants first detected in Britain and South Africa circulate globally, President Joe Biden plans to bar travel by non-citizens into the United States from South Africa.

A White House official said Sunday that the South Africa travel ban would go into effect on Jan. 30 and that an existing ban would be extended on non-citizen travelers from Europe and B...

Puffy coats have their place, but it's not inside a car seat.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers a variety of tips for keeping your little ones safe and warm while traveling by car.

The first is to avoid dressing children in puffy coats or snowsuits before buckling them in, because car seat straps won't tighten enough. That creates a danger that the fluffy padding will ...

America's roads are notoriously unsafe on New Year's Eve, and a new study shows that marijuana legalization could be making the situation even worse.

Almost half of teenagers who regularly use pot admit they've gotten behind the wheel while stoned, a new study in JAMA Network Open reveals.

Overall, twice as many teens report driving under the influence of marijuana tha...

For Americans who are worried about the new coronavirus variant that is circulating in Britain, experts in the United States urge everyone to stay calm.

So far, the new variant only seems to spread more easily, with no evidence of higher virulence (ability to cause harm), researchers at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago explained.

"There's no reason to get scared or panic, we j...

Driving is a high-risk behavior for teenagers under ordinary circumstances, but new research shows that many who have experienced a concussion may be returning to the road too soon.

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) found that about 47% of teen drivers included in the study returned to driving within two weeks of...

TUESDAY, Dec. 8, 2020 (HealthDay) -- 'Donorcycles:' That what hospital trauma staff call motorcycles, since riding one without a helmet greatly raises the odds the driver will become an organ donor far too soon.

A new study out of Michigan supports the grim nickname: It found that organ donations among unhelmeted riders rose three-fold after the state repealed its mandatory helmet law.

Traveling in a car with another person during the pandemic? Certain key steps might cut the odds of coronavirus spread during the trip, researchers say.

One big move that helps: Drive with all four windows down and have the passenger sit in the rear seat on the opposite side from the driver, the new study found.

This helps create "an air flow pattern that travels across the cabin, ...

As marijuana laws relax and the popularity of CBD products explodes, more Americans may find themselves behind the wheel after taking either of these cannabis-linked substances.

Now, an on-the-road study found that the danger of driving after consuming a marijuana product varies depending on what the main ingredient was.

If it was cannabidiol (CBD), which is often found in medi...

As COVID-19 cases surge throughout the United States and the holiday season kicks off with Thanksgiving on Thursday, families are faced with a challenging choice.

Do they skip family gatherings and the usual way they celebrate their traditions? Or do they risk bringing the novel coronavirus to their extended family of loved ones?

In a new nationwide poll of 1,443 parents, about one ...

As college students prepare to leave their campuses for Thanksgiving or study remotely for the rest of the semester, families should consider their risks and work to reduce them, according to an infectious disease expert.

Dr. David Cennimo, an assistant professor in pediatric infectious disease at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, offered suggestions on how families could appro...

Americans should stay home and avoid big Thanksgiving gatherings, leading public health agencies and medical societies warn as COVID-19 surges and pandemic deaths in the United States pass 250,000.

At a press conference held Thursday, officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised people to limit celebrations to only those who've been living in the household for ...

The most common form of epilepsy is a risk factor for car crashes, yet it can have such subtle symptoms that it often goes undiagnosed for an extended period of time, even years.

Researchers said the failure to recognize symptoms of subtle seizures is the main reason for a delay in the diagnosis of focal epilepsy.

The condition, which affects only one part of the brain, is o...

Off-road vehicles are meant for exactly that -- riding on rough terrain including mud, sand and uneven ground.

A new study found that combining two questionable ideas -- driving all-terrain and other off-road vehicles on paved roads in the dark -- is particularly dangerous, especially since alcohol is often involved.

"It's lack of visibility and also what people are doing at...

Face masks and hand-washing are a good start, but to protect your kids from the coronavirus you'll need to up your game on the road, too, a leading pediatricians' group says.

There are a number of things parents should do to protect children from COVID-19 infection when they're traveling in cars or using other types of transportation, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (A...

Seniors and teens are more likely to drive vehicles that lack important safety features, a new study finds.

That adds to risks on the road. Newly licensed drivers have the highest crash risk of any age group, while older drivers have the highest fatal crash rate, according to experts at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

The...

As the popularity of electric scooters has accelerated in the United States, so have serious injuries, which nearly doubled in just one year, a new study reveals.

In 2019, more than 29,600 e-scooter riders were treated in U.S. emergency rooms, up from about 15,500 the year before, the researchers found.

"I probably operate on at least two to three people that have scooter i...

Just how safe is it to fly during the pandemic?

The story of one international flight in March -- before the advent of mask and glove protocols -- suggests that even with infected passengers aboard, the odds of catching COVID-19 are relatively small.

Reporting Aug. 18 in the journal JAMA Network Open, German researchers recount the health outcomes for 102 passengers w...

After a concussion, it may not be safe to drive for a while, a new, small study suggests.

"People who have concussions often have slower reaction times as a result, and do more poorly on tests of thinking skills after their injury than their peers without concussions," said researcher Julianne Schmidt, from the University of Georgia.

"Our study suggests that complicated dri...

If you're thinking about traveling this summer, you need to consider the risks posed by the coronavirus pandemic, an expert says.

Factors to think about include your age, your health and other people in your household.

"The first question you should answer is whether you or a member of your household have a condition that increases the risk for developing COVID-19," said Dr....

Memorial Day is fast approaching, summer travel plans have mostly been wrecked by the COVID-19 pandemic, and people are climbing the walls.

Is there any way you can get out of your house and have a little bit of fun, without running a huge risk of contracting the COVID-19 coronavirus?

Experts say yes -- if you maintain the social distancing rules that everyone absorbed durin...

Since marrying in 2002, Doug Behan and Lise Deguire have gone on safari in Tanzania, watched the sunset over the Santorini caldera in the Greek Islands and walked through the ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru.

And those are just a few of their annual excursions. "It's on my bucket list that I want to visit every continent," Deguire said.

Early this year, the Yardley, Pennsylvania, c...

Sparse traffic on U.S. roads during the coronavirus pandemic has spawned a spike in speeding and other types of reckless driving, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) says.

Here are some examples.

Police in Colorado, Indiana, Nebraska and Utah have clocked drivers going more than 100 miles per hour on highways.

In Los Angeles, cars are going as much as ...

Uber and Lyft are a convenient way to get around town and get home after a night of bar-hopping, but crashes involving cars and pedestrians haven't decreased, a new study finds.

These ride-hailing or ride-sharing services have made 11 billion trips in the United States since they began in 2010, and crashes involving drunk drivers have decreased -- but the total number of crashes hasn...

If more women were hired for trucking jobs, the roads would be a lot safer, British researchers suggest.

That's because men, who hold most driving jobs, are more likely to drive dangerously. This puts other road users at risk, said lead researcher Rachel Aldred. She's a reader in transport at the University of Westminster in London.

"Greater gender equity would have a posi...

The coronavirus crisis has millions of Americans questioning whether it's wise, or even safe, to travel this spring.

Now, an infectious disease expert has created a checklist to help you decide whether to go ahead with your trip or cancel it.

COVID-19 is an illness caused by a new coronavirus. For most people with healthy immune systems, infection appears to result in mild ...

If losing an hour of sleep with the switch to Daylight Saving Time on Sunday leaves you feeling tired, you're not alone.

Fifty-five percent of Americans feel the same way, according to an American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) survey. For most Americans, the clock will "spring forward" at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 8.

Besides disrupting sleep habits for up to a week, the tra...

Including travel history in patients' medical records could help slow the spread of coronavirus and future infectious outbreaks, two experts say.

Adding travel history to routine information such as temperature, blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in patients' electronic medical records could help put a patient's symptoms in context for health care providers, they explaine...

As the new coronarvirus extends its reach, there are steps you can take to protect yourself and your family, experts say.

"As with any respiratory virus, the main recommendations hold true with the novel coronavirus," said Dr. Rachael Lee, a health care epidemiologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). "Wash your hands, cover your cough with your arm, and stay home if y...

Walking on America's streets is getting ever more dangerous, a new report shows.

Based on data from the first six months of 2019, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) predicts there were 6,590 pedestrian deaths that year, which would be a 5% increase over the 6,227 pedestrian deaths in 2018.

The 2019 figure is the highest number of such deaths in more than 30 ...

Buckle up and get ready for take-off: Flying has never been safer, an expert says.

Despite recent high-profile crashes of Boeing aircraft, the news on flight safety is good: Airline passenger deaths have dropped sharply in recent decades around the world, according to Arnold Barnett, a professor of management at MIT.

"The worldwide risk of being killed had been dropping by a...

Turning the clocks ahead one hour in the spring and losing an hour of sleep increases the risk of fatal car crashes, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 733,000 fatal car crashes that occurred between 1996 and 2017 in states that make the spring switch to Daylight Saving Time (DST).

The risk of fatal crashes rose nearly 6% in the we...

The first U.S. case of a new coronavirus illness that originated in central China has been identified in a patient in Washington State, federal health officials announced on Tuesday.

In a news briefing, officials said that the male patient was hospitalized with pneumonia last week and had recently traveled to Wuhan, a city of 11 million people in China where the outbreak is thought t...

Travelers from China will now have to undergo enhanced screening at three major U.S. airports for symptoms of a new coronavirus that has caused an outbreak of pneumonia in China, federal health officials said Friday.

The three airports -- San Francisco (SFO), New York (JFK) and Los Angeles (LAX) -- receive the most travelers from central China, officials explained.

The U.S. ...

Even when they're not high on marijuana, recreational users of the drug display signs of impaired driving, a new study finds.

The findings may come as a surprise to many, said senior study author Staci Gruber, director of Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery (MIND) at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School affiliate in Belmont, Mass.

"People who use cann...

If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

The res...

Electric scooter accidents are sending droves to emergency rooms -- especially young adults, a new study finds.

As e-scooters' popularity has exploded, so have injuries -- skyrocketing 222% between 2014 and 2018 to more than 39,000. Hospital admissions also soared -- 365% to nearly 3,300.

Head injuries made up about a third of the injuries -- twice the rate seen in...

Millions of Americans, teens and young adults in particular, are driving while high on pot and other illegal drugs, U.S. health officials report.

According to a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 million drivers aged 16 and older said they had driven while stoned in 2018, and more than 2 million said they drove after using other illicit drugs.

...

An individualized approach is needed to treat people at high risk of impaired (drunk) driving, a new report says.

Drunk driving accounted for 29% of U.S. motor vehicle deaths in 2018, the lowest percentage since 1982. But there was still an average of one alcohol-impaired driving death every 50 minutes, or 29 deaths a day, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHS...

Talking and texting on your smartphone is a big no-no for drivers, but new research suggests the same should be true for pedestrians.

According to one database, more than 2,500 men and women went to an emergency room for head and neck injuries sustained while using a smartphone between 1998 and 2017. When that number is extrapolated to include the whole country, the total is likely to...

Electric scooters are everywhere, offering city-dwelling Americans a quick way to get about town. But new research warns that hopping on one might land you in the hospital with a broken wrist or worse.

"E-scooters carry a unique set of risks," cautioned study author Dr. Mohsin Mukhtar, a resident radiologist with the Indiana University School of Medicine. He pointed out that these sco...

If you're among the millions of Americans planning to take to the road this holiday season, remember to make everybody in your vehicle buckle up.

Each year, hundreds of unbelted back seat passengers are killed in crashes, according to a new Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report.

In 2018, 803 unrestrained rear seat passengers age 8 and older lost their lives in c...

More bicyclists on the road make cycling safer, but head and face injuries still occur, a new study finds.

From 2008 to 2017, even as the number of bike riders increased, the number of head and face injuries stayed steady, according to researchers from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

"We believe this may be due to a safety-in-numbers phenomenon, whereby increased public...

Requiring drivers to get treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) saved a trucking company a large amount in insurance costs for other health conditions, a new study shows.

People with apnea repeatedly stop breathing and wake partially during the night, resulting in poor sleep that can worsen other medical conditions.

Researchers noted that even though OSA has been linked...

Nearly half of American adults admit that they've fought to stay awake while driving, a new survey finds.

Of the more than 2,000 respondents, 45% said they'd struggled to remain awake while behind the wheel, while 48% said they'd never driven drowsy, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) survey conducted in September.

Each year in the United Sta...

Could America's roads become safer in the future?

Maybe.

A new online survey involving just over 1,400 participants showed that a growing number of American teens are getting their driver's license before age 18, which means more of them are learning to drive under supervised conditions.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety study released Oct. 21 surveyed teens an...

One in three patients who have implanted devices for irregular heartbeats still drive, despite being banned from getting behind the wheel, a new Danish study finds.

It looked at more than 2,500 patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), which deliver an electric shock to correct potentially deadly abnormal heart rhythms.

Some ICD patients are healthy enough ...

Drinking and driving an electric scooter doesn't mix, according to a new study.

Researchers reported serious injuries like brain bleeding or fractures that have happened while riding an electric scooter (e-scooter). Alcohol and drugs were a factor in many of these crashes.

"E-scooters may look like fun and games, but it's a vehicle. It's a motor attached to wheels, and you n...

Hot car deaths set a U.S. record last year, with 53 children dead because they were left behind or got trapped inside an overheated vehicle, according to the National Safety Council.

So far this year the tally is 35.

Children are especially at risk because their body temperature can rise three to five times faster than that of an adult, according to the safety council and t...