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Health News Results - 161

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mornings spent figuring out Sudoku or finessing a crossword could spell better health for aging brains, researchers say.

In a study of over 19,000 British adults aged 50 and over who were tracked for 25 years, the habit of doing word or number puzzles seemed to help keep minds nimble over time.

"We've found that the more regularly p...

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cuddler the bear, Aibo the dog, Justocat the purring kitty: They may only be furry, lifelike robots, but they have a made a real impact in nursing homes.

That's the finding of new British research that suggests these high-tech "robopets" are the next best thing for nursing home residents unable to have a beloved pet or those suffering from lone...

SUNDAY, May 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When men with prostate cancer have to take drugs that block the testosterone fueling their tumors, they can suffer a host of side effects that include impotence, bone loss, heart trouble and obesity.

But new research uncovers yet another possible downside to the treatment: These men may be at greater risk for dementia...

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With findings that might alter the path of Alzheimer's research, scientists say misfolded forms of two proteins appear to spread through patients' brains similar to an infection.

The findings suggest that Alzheimer's is a "double-prion" disorder. This discovery could help lead to new treatments that focus directly on prions, according to rese...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly adults commonly have memory and thinking problems that look a lot like Alzheimer's disease, but they might really be suffering from a different form of dementia.

That's according to an international panel of experts who are giving the disease a name for the first time, and detailing what's known about it so far.

Writing in ...

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's and dementia are not an inevitable part of normal aging, and a little exercise might help keep them at bay, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that every hour of light exercise on top of recommended weekly levels of more intense activity reduced brain aging by about a year.

"This study emphasizes the relations...

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When older adults fall prey to scam artists, it might in some cases be an early warning of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

The study of 935 older adults found that those who appeared susceptible to scams were at higher risk of mental decline over the next six years. Compared with their more skeptical peers, they were 47% more l...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Amyloid beta has long been a prime suspect in Alzheimer's disease, since abnormal levels of the protein form disruptive plaques between patients' brain cells.

But drug trials aimed at lowering amyloid levels have repeatedly failed to save people's brains, and some researchers now believe the focus needs to shift to other potential culprits...

SUNDAY, April 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Regular brushing and flossing can save your teeth into old age.

Could it also save your brain?

The bacteria involved in gum disease might play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.

DNA from the bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is more often found in the b...

TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Brain scans can improve diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease, a new study claims.

Researchers assessed the use of PET scans to identify Alzheimer's-related amyloid plaques in the brain. The study included more than 11,000 Medicare beneficiaries with mild thinking impairment or dementia of uncertain cause.

This scanning te...

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia is now one of the leading killers in the United States, with the rate of deaths linked to the disease more than doubling over the past two decades.

"Overall, age-adjusted death rates for dementia increased from 30.5 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 66.7 in 2017," say a team of researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ...

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A grandparent's mental decline or a great uncle's waning memory may indicate you, too, have greater risk for Alzheimer's disease -- especially if closer relatives have the condition, a new study says.

Alzheimer's in both a first-degree relative (parents, siblings) and a second-degree relative (grandparent, aunt, uncle, nieces or nephews) ...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia appears to strike people of different races in different ways, brain autopsies have revealed.

Hispanic and black people are more likely to suffer from dementia that's caused in part by micro-strokes or hardening of the arteries that serve the brain, researchers report.

On the other hand, whites are more likely to have deme...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A long-running study questions the conventional wisdom that a healthy diet may help ward off dementia.

European researchers followed more than 8,200 middle-aged adults for 25 years -- looking at whether diet habits swayed the odds of being diagnosed with dementia. In the end, people who ate their fruits and vegetables were at no lower risk t...

THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many women turn to hormone therapy to ease some of the more troubling symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes and night sweats.

But new research suggests that relief may come at a cost -- an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease.

The study found that women taking hormone therapy had a 9 percent to 17 percent higher risk of deve...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most seniors expect their doctor to recommend testing of thinking and memory when it's needed.

But a new survey discovered that is rarely the case: Only one in seven seniors received a regular assessment for memory and thinking (or "cognitive") troubles.

That finding is in sharp contrast to those who receive assessments for other c...

SUNDAY, March 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans are left drowsy each day by sleep apnea, and new research suggests it might also raise their odds for Alzheimer's disease.

It isn't clear, however, if sleep apnea causes the buildup of "tau" protein tangles in the brain that are a marker for Alzheimer's, or if the increased tau helps cause the...

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The largest study to date of the genetic underpinnings of Alzheimer's has uncovered five new gene mutations that make people more vulnerable to the memory-robbing disease.

The international team of scientists analyzed the DNA of more than 94,000 people collected by the four groups that make up the International Genomic Alzheimer's Project.

...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While effective at cutting heart risks, blood pressure and cholesterol drugs may not help preserve seniors' brain health, new research finds.

That conclusion came from the tracking of more than 1,600 men and women in 21 countries.

Over an average span of nearly six years, all of the seniors took different combinations of drugs to...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You need to exercise both your brain and your body during middle age to guard against dementia as you grow older, a new, long-term study suggests.

Keeping mentally active through activities like reading, playing music, sewing or painting reduces your overall risk of both dementia and Alzheimer's disease, according to the report.

A...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They're often called "vampire" treatments, in which people undergo infusions of a young donor's blood plasma to treat everything from aging to Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis.

But these expensive "fountain of youth" therapies are unproven and potentially unsafe, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Tuesday.

"Simply put...

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia is hard to predict, but hearing loss might signal a higher risk, a new study suggests.

The eight-year study adds to growing evidence of a link between hearing loss and mental decline.

But don't panic if you no longer can hear the doorbell. The study only points to an association, not cause and effect.

"Our finding...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There are plenty of good reasons to seek a higher education, but avoiding Alzheimer's disease probably isn't one of them, new research suggests.

The study found that a person's level of education wasn't related to the onset of memory and thinking ("cognitive") troubles, or the rate at which dementia progressed.

"Education is rela...

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with dementia show a different makeup in the bacteria dwelling in their guts, a preliminary study finds -- raising questions about whether the "bugs" play some role in the brain disease.

Researchers in Japan found that compared with dementia-free older adults, those with the disease typically had a very different gut "microbiome." The...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The polar vortex that has enveloped much of the United States this week poses a special danger to people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

"This type of weather can be hazardous for everyone, but even more so for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease, who may have difficulty noticing temperature and weather changes...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tight control of your blood pressure won't necessarily spare you from full-blown dementia, a new trial concludes.

But it might lower the risk of slight declines in thinking and memory, a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the researchers added.

The clinical trial is the "first study in history to show that any inter...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with blood pressure that's higher than normal, but not yet high blood pressure, are still more likely to have brain shrinkage than those with normal blood pressure, a new German study finds.

It's long been thought that high blood pressure takes decades to affect the brain.

However, the new findings show "that subtle c...

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain's blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer's-related proteins amyloid and tau were present.

...

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Frailty is associated with a higher risk of both Alzheimer's disease and its crippling symptoms, a new study shows.

"By reducing an individual's physiological reserve, frailty could trigger the clinical expression of dementia when it might remain asymptomatic in someone who is not frail," said study leader Dr. Kenneth Rockwood, a professor at ...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Staying active in old age may help preserve your memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

In fact, older people who were physically active kept their minds sharp, even if their brains showed signs of lesions or other markers linked to Alzheimer's disease or other dementias, researchers found.

"Physical activity may provi...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Poor sleep is common among Alzheimer's patients, and researchers say they're beginning to understand why.

Scientists studied 119 people aged 60 and older. Eighty percent had no thinking or memory problems, while the rest had only mild problems.

The researchers found that participants with less slow-wave sleep -- deep sleep that's n...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's disease may be twice as common in black Americans as in whites, and scientists don't really know why.

But new research uncovers a clue that suggests that diagnosing the brain-robbing disease may not be the same for these two populations.

The study found that black people typically have lower levels of the brain protein tau...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of Americans will unwrap a scarf or sweater this holiday season. But a growing number will receive a gift that's potentially life-changing: an at-home genetic testing kit.

Home DNA testing yields clues to ancestry and, potentially, genetic risk for medical conditions. But there are a number of things you need to know before you use one of...

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A brain protein linked to Alzheimer's disease might potentially be transmitted to people during neurological procedures, a new preliminary study suggests.

Genetically engineered lab mice developed amyloid-beta deposits in their brains after they were injected with amyloid-laced samples of human growth hormone taken from decades-old human cad...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down -- but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the "use it or lose it" theory on brain health. The concept holds that mentally engaging activities -- from reading to crosswords to board game...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Fast tests designed to help primary care doctors rapidly spot dementia in their elderly patients often get it wrong, a new British report contends.

The finding concerns three widely used quick dementia tests: the "Mini-Mental State Examination" (intended to assess mental orientation and verbal memory); the "Memory Impairment Screen" (which ...

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental Alzheimer's disease vaccine shows promise in animal tests, and researchers say it could have the potential to reduce dementia cases by half.

In mice created to develop Alzheimer's, the vaccine triggered an immune response that reduced accumulation of two toxic proteins associated with the fatal brain disease.

There wa...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Seven in 10 people with Down syndrome show evidence of dementia when they die, new research from Britain reveals.

"The link between Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease has been known for some years now," explained study author Rosalyn Hithersay, a doctoral candidate in the department of forensic and neurodevelopmental science at King's Colle...

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's patients taking diabetes drugs may have fewer signs of dementia in their brains than similar patients not taking the drugs, new research finds.

Specifically, the post-mortem study found that people who'd taken diabetes meds had fewer abnormalities in tiny blood vessels in their brains, and less abnormal gene activity.

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Look after your heart to be kind to the mind. That's the primary message emerging from research into Alzheimer's, a disease of the brain that appears to be deeply driven by what happens to the heart and blood vessels.

The link between high blood pressure and Alzheimer's disease has been a particular focus of recent studies.

...

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stiff arteries may significantly raise the risk of dementia, researchers report.

Investigators analyzed data from 356 elderly people (average age 78) in Pittsburgh who were followed for more than 15 years. They found that stiff arteries were a good predictor of dementia.

Specifically, those seniors with higher levels of arterial stif...

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's growing evidence that the herpes virus responsible for cold sores also may cause Alzheimer's disease, a new research paper contends.

It's been long known that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) can been found in the brains of elderly people with Alzheimer's disease, and research has shown that herpes increases Alzheimer's risk in people gen...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A precision map of a part of the brain of the lowly mouse could be a potent new research tool against Alzheimer's, researchers say.

The highly detailed look at the mouse hippocampus should provide new insight into a range of brain diseases in humans, according to the research team from the University of Southern California.

That's...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many older breast cancer patients might worry that they will be struck by "chemo brain" after their treatments, but a new study suggests that only those who carry a gene linked to Alzheimer's face that risk.

Researchers found that breast cancer survivors carrying the APOE4 gene who underwent chemotherapy were more likely to experience long-...

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Only a small percentage of Americans have had their DNA analyzed -- but many are tempted to try it, according to new research.

For the study, University of Michigan researchers surveyed nearly 1,000 adults aged 50 to 64. While curious about their ancestry or health risks, the majority said they fear they'll worry excessively if they learn the...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost $200,000 over the course of two years. That is the cost of the care that a family member typically gives a loved one with Alzheimer's disease.

That's according to a new study that attempted to put a price tag on the burden of the day-to-day help that millions of folks with the memory-robbing disease need for shopping, cooking, clea...

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise might delay a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that 2.5 hours of walking or other physical activity a week thwarted mental decline tied to autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD). This is an inherited form of disease that leads to dementia at an early age.

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Arterial stiffness among people with mild cognitive impairments could put them at higher risk for progressing to dementia, which may include Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study exploring the connection between the brain and vascular health.

The French study, published Friday in the American Heart Association journal ...

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- By 2060, almost 14 million Americans will suffer from Alzheimer's disease, a number that's nearly three times as high as today, a new report projects.

"This study shows that as the U.S. population increases, the number of people affected by Alzheimer's disease and related dementias will rise, especially among minority populations," said Dr....

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The very air you breathe may make you vulnerable to developing dementia, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that people exposed to higher levels of air pollution had 40 percent higher odds of developing dementia.

"We found that older patients across greater London who were living in areas with higher air pollution were...

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Wellness Library Results - 25

Anybody who met Mable Weaver several years ago would have never guessed she was in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. As the Berkeley, California, resident entered her 80s, she was alert and active, and she even held a job as a housekeeper. At that time, her next-door neighbor and daughter, LaFrancine Weaver Tate, was the only person who suspected a problem. And as Tate soon discovered, it w...

The deep fragrance of soy and garlic wafted out to the nurses' station from Mrs. Lee's room, signaling that her daughter, Mrs. Wong, had arrived with lunch. Time for me to make rounds. Mrs. Wong was her mother's interpreter and advocate, as well as her cook. When I walked in, Mrs. Wong was untying the handles of white plastic bags bearing red Chinese lettering. Inside were rectangular plastic cont...

Alzheimer's disease steals a person's privacy as surely as it steals memory. At a certain stage, your loved one may recall a time when she could bathe herself, but that time has passed. As a caregiver, it's your job to keep her clean while maintaining her comfort and dignity. The job description will change constantly with the disease. At first, the person in your care may feel embarrassed about ...

For 20 years, Robyn Yale has been on a mission to raise awareness that people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease can still lead rich, active lives. A licensed clinical social worker who practices in the San Francisco Bay Area, Yale says that the early stage of the disease is different from what happens in middle and later stages. People in the early stages are healthy, high functioning, and in m...

Most caregivers will do practically anything for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease. They'll give baths, help to dress the person, cut up food into manageable bites, and patiently answer the same question 20 times in a row. But when a patient starts wetting or soiling himself, even the most dedicated caregivers can feel defeated. It's hard to face the prospect of constantly cleaning urine stain...

You may feel unsettled when your mother botches her favorite recipe. Then again, who hasn't confused tablespoons with teaspoons a few times? But as the months go on, she starts forgetting to turn off burners. She puts salt in her coffee rather than sugar. And one day, she no longer remembers to eat. When Alzheimer's disease begins taking over the brain, even the most basic instincts aren't safe. ...

People with Alzheimer's disease often act as if their minds are caught in an endless tape loop. They may ask the same question 20 times in an afternoon, pace a stretch of floor for hours, or hum a tune that never seems to run out of verses. Many have a condition called echolalia, in which the patient repeats words endlessly or echoes a phrase. If you're caring for someone with the disease, this so...

Before your loved one developed Alzheimer's disease, the two of you used to talk about anything and everything. But what do you say now that he can't remember your name? The right words can be hard to find, but they're more important than ever. Simple, reassuring messages can give your loved one comfort and guidance -- the two things Alzheimer's patients most desperately need. Staying positive ...

With all of the difficulties facing people with Alzheimer's disease -- not to mention their caregivers -- oral hygiene may seem like a trivial issue. Getting a person clean and dressed is hard enough. Who has time to worry about a few cavities or slipping dentures? As it turns out, you do. Investing that time can be one of the most important things you do for your loved one. Dental hygiene cruci...

Your father puts on his pants one leg at a time, just as he has done since childhood. But today, there's something different. Your father has Alzheimer's disease, and this morning, unlike every other morning for the last 70 years, he's pulling on his pants on top of his pajamas. For Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers, the seemingly simple act of getting dressed can turn into a minefield of...

Susan Spiker could never have imagined that at age 27, with a busy married life and two young sons, she would simultaneously become a caregiver to her mother. But six years ago, at age 61, Betty Spiker was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). "For quite a while after my mother's diagnosis, I think I was in denial," says Spiker, now 33, of Atlanta, Georgia. "For a year or so, I really believed...

In a memoir about caring for her husband, who had Alzheimer's disease, Lela Knox Shanks recalls that he once shouted at her, "Get out of here! You're an impostor trying to break up my marriage!" Afraid for her safety, she ran out the back door, sat in the sun, and cried, trying to figure out what to do. After 30 minutes or so, she tapped hesitantly at the back door. Her husband opened it, and excl...

Sometimes it seems people with Alzheimer's disease have lost all concept of boredom. How else could they stand to spend a day staring at the same wall or shuffling up and down the same hallway? The truth is, Alzheimer's patients may feel boredom as deeply as anyone else. And when they can no longer plan their own activities, the boredom can turn to frustration. A person may start wandering the ho...

Alzheimer's disease is like a cat burglar. It slips into a person's life without making a sound, and soon treasured possessions start disappearing: memory, personality, independence. For many years, even the top medical detectives in the country were baffled by such robbery. Doctors knew that the brains of people with Alzheimer's were filled with tangled strings of protein and sticky clumps of pl...

Most of us are choosy when it comes to mattresses, sheets, and pillows, and for good reason: We tend to spend more time in bed than any other single place. For people who are chronically ill or disabled, a quality bed isn't just a luxury item -- it's a necessity. The right bed can bring much-needed comfort. Most important, for people who are bedridden, or who sit or lie in the same position for ho...

As a caregiver, you know Alzheimer's disease never affects just one person in a family. Your life has changed, too, from your social life and relationships to your goals and priorities. "Changed" isn't even the word -- you've gone through a total upheaval, the kind that splits a life in two. In the years before Alzheimer's, you may have worried about the lawn or local politics or today's kids. In ...

Although my father had battled a rare but non-metastasizing form of cancer for 25 years, my mother had never been sick a day in her life. The alarming news of her illness, that it was not arthritis but in fact Lou Gehrig's disease with an accompanying Alzheimer's-type dementia, came from out of a cruel nowhere one September day in 1991. It came at the same time that my father was beginning to real...

When John Baylis's 94-year-old mother fell and broke her shoulder, he knew it was time to talk about a touchy subject: the possibility of helping her with her financial affairs. But she flat-out refused to discuss it. "I'll die in my bed and not be a bother to anyone," she snapped. Two years later, overwhelmed from trying to keep track of her money and pay taxes, she finally relented. Baylis was ...

Ethelinn Block thought her father's strange behavior was just signs of grief over the loss of his wife, and that he would return to normal in time. But after three years, Arthur's decline became alarming. He forgot to pay bills and keep appointments; he misplaced things. His business faltered to the point that his children had to close it down. As loss piled upon loss, eventually the family had to...

Doctors play a vital role in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, but they need help. Close cooperation between doctors, family members, and patients is a vital part of treatment. Doctors need to understand a patient's situation and symptoms in order to make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe the right medication. Meanwhile, patients and family members need to know about the course of the disea...

Have you ever asked for a "whatchamacallit" when you really needed a hammer? Did you ever forget the name of someone you just met? Even in the best of cases, memory is surprisingly fragile. As a person gets older, memory glitches can become a little more common -- and more frightening. Young people laugh off their forgetful moments, but many older people worry that every slipup is a sign of Alzhei...

1. Alzheimer's disease is the same as dementia and is a natural part of the aging process. True False 2. How many people in the United States are thought to suffer from Alzheimer's disease? a. Around a million b. Around 5 million c. Around 25 million d. Around 40 million 3. Which of the following is the most important risk factor for developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease? ...

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba ) is the only remaining member of a family of trees that flourished centuries ago in ancient China. Dubbed a living fossil, ginkgo today thrives worldwide in parks and gardens, and in plantations where leaves of carefully pruned ginkgo shrubs are harvested and processed into supplements. Although the people of China have been using the fruits and seeds since 2800 BC, only dur...

When a loved one has Alzheimer's disease, time takes on new significance. Every day that he or she can hold onto old memories or stay out of a nursing home becomes a gift. Thanks to new treatments and a growing understanding of the disease, families and patients can enjoy more of those gifts than ever before. For some patients, new drugs can delay the advance of the disease for months, or even yea...

There's still no cure for Alzheimer's or known way to prevent it. But if you're worried about developing the disease, your doctor just might give you an unexpected prescription. She might urge you to exercise daily, eat a diet rich in whole foods, and watch your weight. She might even recommend taking a language class or some dance lessons. Or having a fish dinner twice a week. Or adding curry dis...

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