Get Healthy!

Results for search "Insurance: Medicaid".

Health News Results - 64

1 in 3 U.S. Children Lack Adequate Health Insurance

Though they live in one of the world’s richest nations, a growing number of young Americans are without ample health insurance.

A new study reports that 34% of U.S. kids age 17 and under were...

Medicaid Expansion Saved Lives in Affected States: Study

In a sign that the expansion of Medicaid has really worked, new research finds that death rates have declined in states that expanded the public health insurance program.

Medicaid expansion began in 2014 as part of the Affordable Care Act (also known as "Obamacare") and has provided health coverage for an additional 12 million Americans. Expansion is optional, and nearly one-quarter of s...

Almost 13 Million Americans Per Year Skip Meds Due to Cost

Nearly 13 million U.S. adults a year skip or delay filling needed prescriptions due to high price tags, new research shows.

This figure includes more than 2.3 million Medicare beneficiaries and 3.8 million privately insured working-age adults who didn't get needed medications each year in 2018 and 2019 because of cost, according to a nationally representative survey of U.S. households.

Racial Disparities Persist With Childhood Cancers

Black kids and Hispanic kids with cancer fare worse than their white counterparts, a large, nationwide study finds.

"This study suggests that improving health insurance coverage and access to care for children, especially those with low [socioeconomic status], may reduce racial/ethnic survival disparities," Jingxuan Zhao, an associate scientist at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, a...

How the COVID Pandemic Made the Opioid Epidemic Worse, Even as Telehealth Helped

The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken up the U.S. opioid crisis in ways bad and good, increasing the risk of use and overdose but also spurring innovative approaches to treatment.

The pandemic has definitely been linked to an increase in opioid use and overdose deaths, Tufts University's Thomas Stopka said during a HealthDay Now video interview.

"We've been seeing increases in o...

Millions Who Joined Medicaid During Health Emergency Could Soon Lose Coverage

When the COVID-19 public health emergency ends, a new crisis in insurance coverage in the United States may begin.

Fifteen million Americans who enrolled in Medicaid during the pandemic could lose their coverage when the emergency declaration ends, according to an analysis by the Urban Institute, a social policy think tank.

Its researchers said states can minimize disenrollment by k...

Hospitalizing the Unvaccinated Has Cost U.S. Nearly $6 Billion

The cost of providing hospital care for unvaccinated Americans has reached $5.7 billion in just three months, CBS News reported.

Between June and August, about 287,000 people who were not vaccinated were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the United States, according to data from the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) and the Peterson Center on Healthcare, which collaborated to track healt...

Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Helped Americans' Blood Pressure

With the expansion of Medicaid under Obamacare, fewer Americans are uninsured and more are getting their blood pressure and blood sugar under control, a new study finds.

The gains are especially strong among Black and Hispanic patients, according to Boston University researchers.

"Our results suggest that over the longer-run, expanding Medicaid eligibility may improve key chronic di...

Average COVID Hospitalization Is 150 Times More Expensive Than Vaccination

While the cost of administering COVID-19 vaccines is nominal -- and free to consumers in the United States -- the cost of paying for hospitalizations for people who've contracted the virus is dramatically higher.

The average financial cost of hospitalization for a COVID-19 patient insured by Medicare - at $21,752 -- is about 145 times the reimbursement Medicare pays for vaccinating one pe...

Little Change in Number of Uninsured in  Pandemic's First Year

While the COVID-19 pandemic has had a big impact on the economy and jobs, it didn't result in fewer Americans having health insurance.

The number of 18- to 64-year-olds in the United States without health insurance held steady at 11% between March 2019 and April 2021, according to a survey by the Urban Institute, a social policy research organization.

"Unlike the last recession, los...

American Dental Association Pushes for Dental Coverage Under Medicaid

Dental care should be a required part of Medicaid coverage for adults in every state, the American Dental Association and nearly 130 other organizations urge in a letter to Congress.

The groups called on lawmakers to support and advance a bill called the Medicaid Dental Benefit Act.

"Poor oral health hurts more than our mouths," the

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • August 20, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Did Obamacare Expand Access to Insurance for Minorities? In Some U.S. States, Hardly at All

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) reduced the ranks of uninsured Americans, but a recent study shows that many U.S. states did little to close racial gaps in health coverage.

    Researchers found that in the two years after the ACA came into force, some U.S. states showed large reductions in the number of Black, Hispanic and low-income residents who were uninsured.

    Other states, however, s...

    Patients of Color Less Likely to Get Specialist Care Than White Patients

    People of color are consistently less likely to see medical specialists than white patients are, a new U.S. study finds, highlighting yet another disparity in the nation's health care system.

    Researchers found that compared with their white counterparts, Black Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans had significantly fewer visits to doctors of various specialties -- ranging from...

    PrEP HIV Prevention Pills to Be Free for Insured Americans

    Nearly all health insurers must cover the entire cost of HIV prevention treatments, the U.S. government says.

    That includes the two approved pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) drugs Truvada and Descovy, all clinic visits and lab tests, NBC News reported.

    The guidance, issued this week by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, along with the Department of Lab...

    Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical Debt

    The coronavirus pandemic has left plenty of Americans saddled with medical bills they can't pay, a new survey reveals.

    More than 50% of those who were infected with COVID-19 or who lost income due to the pandemic are now struggling with medical debt, according to researchers from The Commonwealth Fund, a nonprofit organization that advocates a high-performing health care system.

    "T...

    More Americans Gaining Access to Opioid Addiction Treatment, But Race Matters

    Opioid addiction treatment has become more widely available to Medicaid recipients under the Affordable Care Act, but Black patients are much less likely than white patients to get that treatment, a new study finds.

    "Opioid use disorder can be treated, just like any other disease, but treatment is most successful when the patient has regular, unimpeded access to trained clinicians who can...

    Cancer Survivors Fared Better Financially After Obamacare

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has eased financial struggles for younger adult cancer survivors, a new study finds.

    University of Michigan researchers analyzed data from more than 20,000 participants in the National Health Interview Survey and found that cancer survivors ages 18 to 64 were less likely to delay treatments and had less difficulty paying for medications or dental care from 20...

    Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

    Many women in the United States aren't screened for cervical cancer because they can't afford it, a new study finds.

    Screening helps reduce cervical cancer cases and deaths, but disparities in screening rates exist based on income, insurance status, race and ethnicity.

    "Low-income women need greater access to insurance coverage options, Medicaid eligibility, or free screening progra...

    U.S. Supreme Court Strikes Down Challenge to Affordable Care Act

    The landmark Affordable Care Act, which has expanded health care coverage to tens of millions of Americans, has withstood a third challenge before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In a 7-2 decision, a majority of justices ruled on Thursday that plaintiffs involved in the case did not sustain any injury that gave them standing to sue, The New York Times reported.

    The decision left un...

    $10,000: What New Parents Might Pay for Childbirth, Even With Insurance

    Having a baby is expensive. The cost of diapers, a crib, a car seat and all the other infant necessities can really add up, and now a new study shows that having a child comes with its own hefty hospital price tag for many U.S. families.

    About one in six families in the Michigan Medicine study spent more than $5,000 to have a baby. For privately insured families whose babies required time...

    As Medicaid Access Expands, So Does Cancer Survival

    More lower-income Americans are surviving cancer due to expanded Medicaid health care coverage, a new study shows.

    Researchers found a link between long-term survival of patients newly diagnosed with cancer -- across all stages and types of the disease -- and expanded Medicaid income eligibility. In other words, survival odds improved in states that granted Medicaid coverage at high...

    It's Still Tough to Find Prices on Most U.S. Hospital Websites

    U.S. hospitals have been required to make their prices public since 2019, but 18 months into the rule more than half weren't doing it, a new study finds.

    In 2018, the Trump administration issued a rule requiring hospitals to publish their "chargemasters" on their websites. A chargemaster is a rundown of a hospital's services, along with their list prices - something akin to the manufactur...

    For the Poor, Even a Small Medical Bill Can Trigger Coverage Loss

    WEDNESDAY, May 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) - When people with low incomes are asked to help pay for their health insurance, some drop their coverage, even when bills as low as $20 per month arrive.

    That's the upshot of a new study of Medicaid expansion in the state of Michigan.

    Leaving the insurance plan means people may miss out on preventive care or timely treatment of illnesses. It...

    Obamacare Gave More Breast Cancer Survivors Access to Breast Reconstruction

    Breast reconstruction rates rose significantly among Black women after Obamacare expanded access to Medicaid, a new study says.

    It also found a large increase in reconstruction rates among women with lower income and education levels.

    The findings suggest "that Medicaid expansion was highly effective in doing what it was supposed to do -- breaking down barriers to care," said lead r...

    Job Losses Hit Americans Hard in Pandemic, Report Confirms

    American families that suffered job losses during the pandemic are struggling to pay their bills and afford food, and many have turned to government help, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data from nearly 7,700 adults who took part in an Urban Institute survey in December 2019 and from more than 7,700 who took part in a December 2020 survey.

    Despite major nationwide job losse...

    Pandemic Has Affected Kids' Dental Health: Poll

    Could the COVID-19 pandemic be taking a toll on kids' teeth?

    A new, nationwide poll found the pandemic has made it harder for parents to get their kids regular dental care. But on the other hand, many say their youngsters are now taking better care of their teeth.

    The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at Michigan Medicine surveyed almost 1,900 parents ...

    Support for Obamacare Grows as Biden Takes Control: Poll

    The popularity of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, continues to grow, with nearly two-thirds of Americans saying they want the law to remain as is or be improved, a new Harris/HealthDay poll shows.

    About 34% of U.S. adults think the Affordable Care Act should remain in place, and another 28% believe it should stay but have some parts changed, according to poll results taken...

    If Elected, Joe Biden Has Big Plans for Health Care

    If Joe Biden becomes the next president, he would have clear and ambitious plans for the nation's health -- expanding the Affordable Care Act, empowering public health agencies to deal with COVID-19, and passing a stimulus bill that would support struggling doctors, hospitals and nursing homes.

    The question is how much he'll be able to accomplish with a Senate that remains in the han...

    Obamacare Means 2 Million Fewer Americans Face Catastrophic Medical Bills Each Year

    Since the passage of "Obamacare," fewer Americans are facing insurmountable medical bills -- but the benefit does not seem to be reaching people with private insurance, a new study shows.

    Researchers found that after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, the number of Americans incurring "catastrophic" health care expenses each year dropped -- from 13.6 million in 2010 to 11....

    Breast Cancer Caught Earlier in U.S. States With Expanded Medicaid: Study

    Early-stage breast cancer is more likely to be diagnosed in U.S. states that have expanded Medicaid coverage under Obamacare than in those that haven't, researchers say.

    Their new study looked at a database of more than 71,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in 31 states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act and 14 states that did not.

    In the expan...

    Obamacare Helps Poorer Americans Spot Cancer Earlier: Study

    Medicaid expansion under Obamacare may have decreased the number of poorer Americans diagnosed with advanced cancer, a new study suggests.

    The study focused on Ohio, which was among the first states to expand its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014.

    The researchers found that in the three years after expansion, low-income residents saw a 15% dro...

    Obamacare Linked to Fewer Leg Amputations for Minorities

    There's been a significant drop in diabetes-related lower leg amputations among non-white patients in states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, a new study finds.

    About one-third of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer, which is the most common cause of foot infection and leg amputation. More than half who have a diabetes-related leg amputation die within five years -- a rat...

    Are Food Allergies Under-Diagnosed in Poor Families?

    Food allergies may be under-diagnosed among children covered by Medicaid, a new study suggests.

    "We were surprised to find such a large discrepancy in estimates of food allergy prevalence in children on Medicaid compared to the general population," said senior study author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, a pediatrician and food allergy researcher at Children's Hospital of Chicago.

    "Our fin...

    Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Might Have Cut U.S. Cancer Deaths

    Cancer death rates have declined more in U.S. states that expanded Medicaid after the Affordable Care Act than in those that didn't, a new study finds.

    "This is the first study to show the benefit of Medicaid expansion on cancer death rates on a national scale," said lead author Dr. Anna Lee, a radiation oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

    ...

    Obamacare May Have Boosted Use of Mammograms

    Medicaid expansion under Obamacare has increased access to mammograms for impoverished older women, a new study suggests.

    In those states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), women who didn't have access to this breast cancer screening tool have it now, the study authors said.

    "The ACA created a natural experiment in which some states expanded Medica...

    Obamacare May Help Many Laid-Off Workers Get Health Insurance

    Millions of Americans in industries hard-hit by the coronavirus pandemic could be eligible for financial help with health insurance, a new study says.

    Many of the newly unemployed might not know they can get public insurance or subsidies for coverage through the Affordable Care Act's insurance marketplaces, according to an analysis published this month by the Urban Institute, a Wash...

    As Unemployment and COVID-19 Cases Rise, Who Will Pay for Care?

    The coronavirus pandemic is spreading across the United States at the same time that millions have been laid off from their jobs.

    That raises the obvious question -- how will those newly unemployed folks pay for medical care if they become infected with the coronavirus?

    Recent bills passed by Congress ensure that people won't have to pay out of pocket for any COVID-19 testin...

    U.S. Drug Prices Have Risen Three Times Faster Than Inflation

    Over the course of a decade, the net cost of prescription drugs in the United States rose more than three times faster than the rate of inflation, a new study finds.

    The net cost of a drug refers to the sticker price minus manufacturer discounts.

    Researchers in the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing (CP3) conducted the analysis on net...

    Fewer American Families Weighed Down by Medical Bills

    The number of people struggling to pay their medical bills declined dramatically during the last decade, as the Affordable Care Act expanded health insurance coverage and financial protection for the sick.

    The percentage of families who had problems paying medical expenses in the previous year declined from about 20% in 2011 to 14% in 2018, according to a new report from the U...

    Medicaid Expansion Meant More Poor in 'Diabetes Belt' Got Insurance

    There was a steep drop in the number of low-income people without health insurance in so-called Diabetes Belt states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, a new study shows.

    The Diabetes Belt is a swath of 644 U.S. counties across 15 southeastern states that have high diabetes rates.

    More than 11% of adults in the Diabetes Belt have the condition, compared with 8.5...

    1 in 5 Insured Hit With Surprise Bills for Surgery

    You scheduled your surgery and made sure both your doctor and hospital are in your insurer's approved network of providers. Everything went without a hitch -- until a whopper of a bill showed up in the mail for "out-of-network" care during your operation.

    The average out-of-network surprise bill tops $2,000, a new study finds. And about 20% of patients who had surgery using a doc...

    2 Million Lost Health Coverage or Access in Trump's First Year

    Two million more Americans didn't seek health care from late 2016 through 2017 because they couldn't afford it and/or lacked insurance, new research shows.

    The analysis of data from 2011 through 2017 also found that health care coverage and access improved with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reversed after President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans bega...

    HIV Drug Costs Soaring, Jeopardizing Effort to End Epidemic

    The U.S. government aims to end the HIV epidemic by 2030, but skyrocketing medication costs may make that a pipe dream, a new study suggests.

    Since 2012, the cost of antiviral treatment for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has jumped 34%. That's nearly four times the inflation rate.

    Even with new generic options, initial treatments now top $36,000 per patient per year,...

    Obamacare May Have Boosted Jobs, Education for Poor

    The Affordable Care Act might have done more than provide more Americans with health insurance: New research suggests accompanying expansions in Medicaid may be linked to higher numbers of low-income people having jobs or going to school.

    That's what happened after Michigan expanded its Medicaid under new rules from the Affordable Care Act.

    Researchers surveyed more than 3,0...

    Despite Obamacare, Number in U.S. Who Can't Afford to See Doctor Keeps Rising

    Even though the Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance, the number of Americans who can't afford to see a doctor keeps increasing, a new study shows.

    The researchers found that compared with two decades ago, more Americans today say they have skipped a needed trip to the doctor due to costs, despite a roughly 60% increase in people with health insurance.

    How Obamacare Helped Some Southern States

    The physical and mental health of poor people is less likely to be at risk in Southern U.S. states that expanded their Medicaid programs under Obamacare, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data from more than 15,500 low-income adults in 12 Southern states and found that Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act reduced the risk of declines in health, particularly among tho...

    Obamacare May Have Prevented Many Opioid-Related Deaths

    The Medicaid expansion brought in by Obamacare may have prevented thousands of deaths from opioid overdoses, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that in U.S. states that expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act, fatal opioid overdoses dipped by 6%, compared to states that opted out. That included an 11% lower death rate from heroin overdoses, and a 10...

    Medical Paperwork Costs U.S. $812 Billion a Year

    Medical paperwork cost the United States $812 billion in 2017 and accounted for more than one-third of total spending for doctor visits, hospitals, long-term care and health insurance, according to a new study.

    However, reducing medical paperwork expenses to the same levels as in Canada -- which has single-payer universal health care -- would have saved the nation more than $600 billi...

    Young Cancer Patients Fare Better on Private Insurance

    The odds of surviving childhood cancer may be influenced by the type of health insurance a young patient has, researchers say.

    In a new study, children and young adults covered by Medicaid or other government agencies were less likely to be alive five and 10 years after their cancer diagnosis than those with private insurance.

    "Patients with Medicaid have less access to prim...

    Heart Medicines Priced Out of Reach for Many Americans

    Many working-age Americans struggle to pay for the heart medications that protect them from heart attack, stroke and heart disease, a new study reports.

    About one in eight adults suffering from a high-risk heart problem say financial strain has caused them to skip taking their meds, delay filling a prescription, or take a lower dose than prescribed, the researchers said.

    Tho...