Get Healthy!

Results for search "Osteoporosis".

Health News Results - 17

Your Microbiome & Vitamin D Levels May Be Linked: Study

The diversity, and therefore the health, of the microbes in your gut is linked to your levels of vitamin D, a new study suggests.

The gut microbiome is composed of bacteria, viruses and other microbes that live in our digestive tracts and are important factors in our health and risk for disease.

In this study, researchers analyzed stool and blood samples from 567 men in six U.S. cit...

Could Common Asthma Meds Weaken Bones?

People who use common asthma controller medications are vulnerable to developing brittle bones and suffering fractures, a new study shows.

The findings point the finger at anti-inflammatory corticosteroids -- whether taken by pill or inhaler.

Corticosteroids are widely used to prevent asthma attacks, particularly in the form of inhalers. When asthma is more difficult to cont...

Unlike Humans, No Bone Loss for Gorillas as They Age

They are the closest relatives to humans, but gorillas have been spared one aging disease that people haven't: osteoporosis.

The condition triggers accelerated bone loss and weakening.

In a new study, researchers used a CT scanner to analyze the leg, arm and spine bones of 34 wild mountain gorillas from Rwanda -- 16 females and 17 males -- aged 11 to 43. That's the full adul...

Indoor Athletes Often Lacking in Vitamin D

Indoor athletes may be vitamin D-deficient, putting themselves at risk of injury and poor performance, a small study finds.

Researchers assessed vitamin D levels in players on George Mason University's men's and women's basketball teams. For the 2018-2019 season, players were given a supplement with a high dose, low dose or no vitamin D.

Vitamin D is essential for building a...

Drinking Takes Toll on Bones of People With HIV: Study

Any amount of alcohol consumption increases the risk of osteoporosis in people with HIV, a new report suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study of 198 people with HIV and a current or past alcohol or drug use disorder.

In these people, any alcohol consumption was associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, putting them at increased ...

Smog May Be Bad for Your Bones

Air pollution not only raises the risk of lung cancer, stroke and respiratory diseases, but it is also bad for your bones, a new study suggests.

The study, done in India, looked at more than 3,700 people from 28 villages outside the city of Hyderabad.

The researchers estimated exposure of fine particulate air pollution and asked participants what fuel they used for cooking....

Vitamin D Alone Doesn't Prevent Fractures, New Study Finds

Taking calcium and vitamin D might help older adults curb the risk of a bone fracture, but vitamin D alone does not do the job, a new research review concludes.

The analysis of 28 past studies found that older adults with higher blood levels of vitamin D were less likely to suffer a broken hip or other fracture over five to 15 years.

But the picture was different in studies ...

Lung Cancer Screening Can Detect Other Smoking Ills

CT lung cancer screening can detect other serious smoking-related conditions, such as heart disease, osteoporosis and emphysema, researchers say.

Medical experts consider lung cancer screening an effective way to detect malignant tumors at earlier, more treatable stages. Now, new research suggests low-dose CT scans of the lungs could also improve diagnosis and treatment of other smoki...

HRT Could Benefit Younger Women After Hysterectomy

Estrogen therapy may help younger women live longer after having their uterus and ovaries surgically removed, new research reports.

The study found that when women under 60 received hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after surgery, their risk of dying during the 18-year follow-up period decreased by almost one-third compared to women taking a placebo.

"In a young woman, it'...

AHA News: Here's Why Stroke Survivors Need to Pay Attention to Bone Health

People who have had a stroke, and the doctors who treat them, have a lot to be concerned about: regaining mobility and function, controlling risk factors for a second stroke, guarding against depression that can result from a newly limited life.

There's another potential consequence not on everyone's list: osteoporosis.

"We don't know as much about osteoporosis and stroke ...

Poor Social Life Could Spell Trouble for Older Women's Bones

A lack of positive connections with others may do more than make older women lonely, with new research suggesting it can also weaken their bones.

In a long-term study of more than 11,000 postmenopausal women in the United States, lower bone mineral density was associated with higher "social strain," a measure of negative social interactions and relationships. Weaker bones were also ti...

Could Antibacterial Triclosan Weaken Women's Bones?

Triclosan, a chemical commonly added to a myriad of consumer products to kill bacteria, may be bad for women's bones, a new study suggests.

"We found that higher triclosan levels in urine were associated with lower bone mineral density in the femur and lumbar spine and increased the risk for osteoporosis in U.S. women, especially postmenopausal women," said lead researcher Yingjun Li,...

Bones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at Bay

Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it's in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults ...

Many Middle-Aged Men May Have Signs of Thinning Bones

Brittle bones are often seen as a woman's health issue, but low bone mass may be more common among middle-aged men than generally thought, a small study suggests.

The research, of 173 adults aged 35 to 50, found that men and women were equally likely to have low bone mass in the hip. It was found in 28% of men and 26% of women.

Those study participants, the researche...

After a Stroke, Your Bones Need Care

Stroke survivors often face limited mobility, which quadruples their odds of osteoporosis, broken bones and falls. But most are never screened for these problems, new research reveals.

"Our study adds to previous research that found despite an increased risk, only a small number of people who have recently had a stroke are tested and treated for osteoporosis," said lead author Dr. Moi...

What's the Right Age to Test for Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a threat to many women, especially after menopause. But the lead up to weak, brittle bones can start much earlier in life.

When bone density drops but isn't yet at the level of osteoporosis, it's called osteopenia. Osteopenia affects more than 33 million Americans over age 50, men and women, while 10 million have osteoporosis.

Yet the DEXA scan, the painless ...

Osteoporosis Often Missed in Elderly Men

Osteoporosis is typically thought of as a woman's disease, but elderly men are also prone to bone loss -- even though they often aren't treated for it, a new study finds.

Among men and women aged 80 and older, women were three times more likely to get osteoporosis treatment, researchers reported.

Ten million Americans have osteoporosis, according to the study. Each year, the...