Get Healthy!

Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Misc.".

Show All Health News Results

Health News Results - 928

Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack Strikes

MONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When young women land in the emergency room with chest pain, they wait longer and get less treatment than their male counterparts, a preliminary study finds.

Using a federal survey of U.S. hospitals, researchers found that younger women with chest pain were treated less urgently than men their age. That included a lower likelihoo...

Vegetarian Diet Could Help Fight Off Disease: Study

There's more evidence that a switch away from meat in your diet could cut levels of unhealthy "biomarkers" that encourage disease, researchers say.

A new study reported Saturday at the virtual European Congress on Obesity (ECO) found that people on vegetarian diets have lower blood levels of disease-linked biomarkers, such as "bad" (LDL) cholesterol and other factors.

Biomarkers ca...

COVID-19 Appears to Have No Lasting Impact on College Athletes' Hearts

Heart complications are rare among college athletes who have had COVID-19, according to a small study.

"Our findings may offer reassurance to high school athletes, coaches and parents where resources for testing can be limited," said senior author Dr. Ranjit Philip, assistant professor in pediatric cardiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in Memphis.

For the ...

Why Sleep Raises Risk for Sudden Death in People With Epilepsy

New research gives insight into why people with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden death during sleep.

The study found that both sleep and epileptic seizures work together to slow heart rate, and that seizures also disrupt the body's natural regulation of sleep-related changes.

These factors can sometimes lead to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), which caused the 20...

Could Your Child Have a Heart Defect? Know the Warning Signs

Heart defects are often – but not always – detected at birth, so it's important to pay attention when a child gets dizzy, passes out or says her heart is "beeping."

These and other warning signs, such as an apparent change in fitness, shouldn't be overlooked, an expert says.

Evaluating a child who has these symptoms is important to ensure nothing is missed that could becom...

Are You Taking a Med That's Raising Your Blood Pressure?

FRIDAY, May 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in five Americans with high blood pressure use medications that can cause blood pressure to spike, a preliminary study shows.

The researchers said the findings are concerning, given how many people have difficulty controlling their high blood pressure.

"A large number of Americans are not meeting their blood press...

AHA News: How Social Isolation Can Harm Health as You Age – and How to Prevent It

Barbara Stopfer hasn't had much of a social life since her husband died six years ago. She stopped seeing coworkers, too, after her heart condition required her to cut back her hours and work remotely.

But the 79-year-old stayed connected to people at her residential community for older adults, through activities like mahjong and the occasional lunch outing. Her brightest hours were when ...

State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

Poor mental health after a heart attack may increase young and middle-aged adults' risk of another heart attack or death a few years later, a new study suggests.

The study included 283 heart attack survivors, aged 18 to 61 with an average age of 51, who completed questionnaires that assessed depression, anxiety, anger, stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within six months of ...

How a Little Alcohol Might Help the Heart

A bit of booze may help protect your heart by reducing stress-related brain activity, a new study suggests.

"The thought is that moderate amounts of alcohol may have effects on the brain that can help you relax, reduce stress levels and, perhaps through these mechanisms, lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease," said lead author Dr. Kenechukwu Mezue, a nuclear cardiology fellow at M...

AHA News: Prenatal Stress Can Program a Child's Brain for Later Health Issues

Soaring blood pressure. A racing heartbeat. Trouble sleeping. Excessive worrying. Difficulty concentrating. These are warning signs of out-of-control stress and anxiety, and their roots could begin long before you might think.

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health issue in the United States, affecting nearly 1 in 5 adults, or 40 million people. Another 19 million adults – ...

What's the Right Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Heart?

There's a "sweet spot" for the amount of sleep you should get to reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke, new research shows.

Folks who get six to seven hours a sleep a night -- no more, no less -- have the lowest chance of dying from a heart attack or stroke, according to new findings.

Waking early or dozing on past that ideal window increases your risk of heart-related death...

Heart Disease Often Comes in Pairs, Spouse Study Shows

Couples share a lot together, but heart disease wouldn't be on any couples' list. However, new research out of China shows that if your spouse has heart disease you're likely at high risk for it, too.

Living together can often mean unhealthy habits are shared, explained the study's lead author.

"We found that an individual's cardiovascular disease risk is associated with the health...

Breathing Other People's Smoke Can Raise Your Odds for Heart Failure

Exposure to secondhand smoke may up your odds for heart failure, a new study warns.

Researchers analyzed nationwide survey data from more than 11,000 nonsmokers (average age: 48) who were followed from 1988 to 1994. Nearly 1 in 5 had lab test evidence of exposure to secondhand smoke.

Nonsmokers with recent exposure were 35% more likely to develop heart failure than those with none, ...

'Prediabetes' Raises Odds for Heart Attack, Stroke

Prediabetes -- where blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes -- is not something you should dismiss.

It significantly increases the risk of heart attack, stroke and other serious heart problems, new research shows.

The findings highlight the need for health care providers and patients to prevent prediabetes, according to authors of the s...

Could High-Dose Fish Oil Raise Odds for A-Fib in Heart Patients?

MONDAY, May 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Many people take fish oil to protect their heart, but a new study suggests that prescription versions may raise the risk of a common heart rhythm disorder.

At issue are prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids, which are naturally found in fish oil. The medications are often prescribed to people with very high trigly...

AHA News: 47-Year-Old Relearned to Walk, Talk and Count After Stroke

Chris Monaghan woke up one morning and tried to get out of bed. She couldn't.

Her husband, Dan, heard her whimpering, turned on the light and realized almost instantly she was having a stroke. It was something he long feared because of her family history.

"She was trying to speak, but she couldn't speak. Her right side was pretty much paralyzed. Her eyes were rolling around, and her...

AHA News: After 47 Minutes, One Final Try Resuscitated Her

On a November evening, Diana and Paul Nickel played a spelling game and shared an ice cream birthday cake with their 6-year-old granddaughter, Molly. The couple was staying with Molly and her 8-year-old sister, Kate, while the girls' parents were out of town.

Around 7:30 p.m., the girls began getting ready for bed. Paul was looking for a book to read to them when he heard a crash from the...

AHA News: Take Stock of Your Health With This Post-Lockdown Checklist

As more people in the United States are vaccinated against COVID-19, and some areas experience a slowdown in virus infections, the nation is slowly starting to reopen. According to health care professionals, post-lockdown life should start with taking stock of your own health.

"It's a great time to do a (health) reboot," said Dr. Kathryn M. Rexrode, chief of the division of women's health...

Good Stroke Recovery May Depend on Your ZIP Code: Study

Stroke recovery tends to be worse among Americans in poorer neighborhoods than those in wealthier neighborhoods, a new study finds.

"People in less advantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have more disability, lower quality of life and more symptoms of depression than people in more advantaged neighborhoods," said study author Lynda Lisabeth, from the University of Michigan in Ann Ar...

AHA News: Misdiagnosed With Acid Reflux and Anxiety, Her Heart's Arteries Were Blocked

Walking briskly up a steep hill to pick up her daughter from school, Katrien Limón felt a pain in her chest.

"Like I had the worst acid reflux of my life," she said.

Katrien, who lives in Montrose, California, had been treated for acid reflux before. So on that afternoon in June 2018, she took medication and drank water. The pain, however, only seemed to go away when she stopped or...

AHA News: Is All Exercise Equal? How to Balance Workouts to Create the Ideal Fitness Plan

Spring can be an ideal time to try a new exercise routine. Warmer temperatures make it enticing to head outdoors and, this year, more people might be considering a return to the gym after getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

While any regular physical activity can benefit your health, the ideal fitness plan requires the right balance.

The American Heart Association recommends adults get at...

AHA News: Higher Pulse Pressure in Smokers May Signal Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Consistent cigarette smoking has a small but significant effect on pulse pressure, according to research that suggests a possible new link between smoking and cardiovascular disease, especially among Black and white women.

Pulse pressure is the difference between systolic blood pressure, the top number in a reading, and diastolic blood pressure, the lower number. "As that gap widens, it's...

AHA News: Experts Remain Confident About Vaccine Safety Monitoring

The now-ended pause in use of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine raised concerns about whether confidence might be rattled in vaccines and how they are monitored for safety.

Experts say it should do the opposite.

"I think this is a clear example that the system works, that there are many safeguards put in place after either a drug or vaccine begins to get use in the public," said ...

COVID-19 Could Raise Odds for Heart Failure, Even in Those With No Prior Heart Risk

TUESDAY, April 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In rare cases, people hospitalized for COVID-19 can develop heart failure, even if their hearts were previously healthy, new research shows.

The researchers found that of over 6,400 COVID-19 patients at their hospital, 0.6% newly developed heart failure. That included eight patients — mostly relatively young men — with no ...

AHA News: Salt Sensitivity May Increase Risk of High Blood Pressure

People who are salt-sensitive may have an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study that points to the need for better genetic testing for sodium sensitivity.

Scientists already knew high salt sensitivity is more common among people with high blood pressure, which is a leading preventable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. But researchers wanted to invest...

Worry, Depression Can Plague Folks Who Get Implanted Defibrillators

An implanted heart defibrillator is a life changer in more ways than one. More than one in 10 patients who receive the device also developed anxiety or depression, a new study reveals.

The findings highlight the need for regular screening of patients who receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in order to identity those who may require additional mental health support, acc...

Closely Monitor Heart Health in Cancer Patients Who Get Hormonal Therapies: AHA

If hormones are part of your treatment for breast or prostate cancer, your heart health should be closely monitored, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement.

Hormonal therapies for breast and prostate cancer increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, the authors noted. This increased risk is greater in patients who already have two or more heart risk factors...

AHA News: Doctor Asked, 'Did You Know You Had a Heart Attack?'

At an annual checkup, Tasha Benjamin's doctor looked over her electrocardiogram readings and asked whether she'd had a heart attack.

Thinking it was a joke, she responded, "Well, I do have a husband and four kids."

"No," the doctor said. "This shows you had a heart attack."

Then 36, Tasha couldn't recall suffering any of the major symptoms of a heart attack – chest pain; sho...

AHA News: Food, Culture and the Secret Ingredient to Address Lack of Diversity in Nutrition Field

You are what you eat. And what you eat is a reflection of who you are – your family, your history, your traditions.

But for many people who need guidance on eating, finding an expert with a common background can be a challenge. Most dietitians – 81% of them according to the credentialing agency for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – are white. Nearly 94% are women.

That ...

Long-Haul COVID Symptoms Common, Rise With Severity of Illness

For people who've suffered through a bout of COVID-19, their misery is too often not over. New research shows that a wide variety of "long-haul" symptoms are common, and the risk rises along with the severity of their case of COVID-19.

In what may be the largest such study to date, "the findings show that beyond the first 30 days of illness, substantial burden of health loss — spanning...

You Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts Warn

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Extra padding around the belly can spell trouble for the heart, even if you're not technically overweight.

That's among the conclusions of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), where experts lay out the heart risks of being "apple-shaped."

It encourages doctors to dust off those old-fashi...

'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Waking up briefly throughout the night may do more than leave you feeling grumpy and tired in the morning.

Disrupted sleep may actually increase your odds of dying early from heart disease or any other cause, and women seem to be harder hit by these effects than men.

"The data underscores all the more reasons why we nee...

Chocolate, Butter, Sodas: Avoid These Foods for a Healthier Middle Age

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- It's no secret that too much sugar and saturated fat aren't good for you, but what food combos put you at greater risk for heart disease and death in middle age?

The answer, from a new University of Oxford study, is likely to disappoint a lot of folks.

Researchers found that diets heavy in chocolate and pastries, butter...

Two Is Not Better Than One When It Comes to Blood Thinners

It may not be a good idea to take a daily low-dose aspirin if you're also taking a widely used class of blood thinners called direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), researchers caution.

DOACs include drugs such as Eliquis (apixaban), Pradaxa (dabigatran), Lixiana (edoxaban) and Xarelto (rivaroxaban). They're used to help prevent strokes from atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of what's...

AHA News: Cancer May Cause Changes to the Heart Before Treatment

Some types of cancer may alter the appearance and function of the heart, according to new research that analyzed people's hearts before cancer treatment.

An estimated 1.9 million people in the United States are expected to be diagnosed with cancer this year, according to the National Cancer Institute. Having a history of cancer is linked to a greater risk of cardiovascular problems: Older...

Brain Injuries Raise Long-Term Risk of Stroke

People who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a significantly higher risk for stroke for years afterward, U.K. researchers say.

Previous studies have linked brain injury with a long-term risk of neurological diseases including dementia, Parkinson's and epilepsy, and it's been suggested that it's also an independent risk factor for stroke.

This new review of 18 studies from f...

AHA News: After Two Heart Valve Surgeries, a Mental Toll

After Ivan Hernandez was born with a defective mitral valve, doctors warned his parents he could face heart failure at any age.

Yet Hernandez grew up without incident. He played all sorts of sports, cultivating a love for fitness. As an adult, he sometimes exercised twice a day. He regularly participated in high-intensity interval training and other extreme workouts.

He thought less...

AHA News: Pandemic-Fueled Drug Abuse Threatens Hearts, Lives

On a recent day in his Denver Health emergency room, Dr. Eric Lavonas hit another tragic trifecta.

"In a nine-hour shift, I took care of somebody with chest pain from cocaine, somebody with an opioid overdose who quit breathing, and somebody with methamphetamine use who thought he was being chased by shape-shifting demons," he said. "Sadly, that is not a rare occurrence anymore."

La...

Too Much Red Meat Might Harm Your Heart

TUESDAY, April 20, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you've ever scoffed at warnings that too much red or processed meat is bad for the heart while oily fish is good for you, there's now some visual evidence to support that advice.

British researchers used heart imaging to see how these foods affected volunteers' heart health.

The images revealed that those who ate more...

Hormone Treatments May Raise Blood Pressure in Transgender People

Monitoring blood pressure is important for transgender people, according to new research, which found changes in systolic blood pressure after the start of gender-affirming hormone therapy.

Transgender men and transgender women have a higher burden of heart attack, stroke and related conditions, the study noted.

Gender-affirming hormone therapy isn't new. Doctors have prescribed the...

AHA News: Could the Pandemic Help Boost Diversity in Clinical Trials?

The pandemic has exposed troubling inequities in the United States that have left Black and Hispanic people at higher risk of dying from COVID-19 – and getting a smaller share of vaccines.

Now, a renewed focus on health inequities has sparked hope among health advocates for a structural change that has been a long time coming: more diversity in clinical trials.

Back in 1994, the N...

AHA News: While Mopping, Young Mom's Heart Tore

On a Saturday morning last August, Sindi Mafu had started her typical weekly chores – dusting, laundry, sweeping. Her 4-year-old daughter, Avela, was busy with her Zoom ballet class, and her toddler, Lunga, was eating his breakfast. Sindi grabbed her mop.

She started sweating – profusely. Too much for merely mopping. She checked to make sure the air conditioner was on (it was), began ...

1 in 50 COVID Patients in ICU Will Develop a Stroke

FRIDAY, April 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Among COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs), 2% suffer a stroke, a new study finds.

Of the two types of stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, which is caused by bleeding in the brain, was linked to a higher risk of death than ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blood clot in the brain. Data on just under 2,700 patients was u...

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's Health

High blood pressure. Structural racism.

What do they have in common?

Researchers say they are two of the biggest factors responsible for the gap in poor heart and brain health between Black and white adults in the United States. And they are inextricably linked.

Studies show high blood pressure, also called hypertension, affects Black adults – particularly women – earlier ...

AHA News: Waist Size May Better Predict AFib Risk in Men

Body mass index may be more helpful in predicting the risk of a common type of irregular heartbeat in women, while waist size may better predict that risk in men, new research suggests.

The link between obesity and atrial fibrillation, or AFib – when the heart beats irregularly and often too fast – is well established. But researchers wanted to understand the extent to which body fat ...

AHA News: 5 Things to Know This Earth Day About How the Environment Affects Health

Earth Day on April 22 puts a spotlight on the planet's health which, doctors say, is closely tied to your own.

Here are five things to know about the connection.

Pollution is not a small, faraway health issue

"The footprint of pollution globally is massive," and air pollution is the biggest danger, said Dr. Sanjay Rajagopalan, chief of cardiovascular medicine ...

AHA News: Straight Answers to Common Questions About COVID-19 Vaccines

If you've got questions about COVID-19 vaccines, you're not the only one. Even as many people rush to get their shots, surveys show others just aren't sure about them.

Dr. Won Lee, medical director of Boston Medical Center's Home Care Program, understands. "There's so much misinformation out there," she said. "And it's hard for anyone to know what to believe."

Lee is part of a medic...

Physically Active at Work? It's Not as Healthy as Leisure Exercise

Going for a brisk walk after a long day at work may be better for your heart than getting all of your exercise on the job.

New research suggests that while current health guidelines indicate that leisure-time activity and physical activity at work are created equally when it comes to heart health benefits, this may not be the case after all.

Leisure-time exercise -- whether it be ta...

AHA News: Instructed in CPR By 911 Dispatcher, Nebraska Couple Saves 13-Day-Old Son

During a nightly TV newscast in January, anchor Bill Schammert's voice broke as he described why he'd been off the air for a few days.

It started when his 13-day-old son, Cameron, came down with a case of the sniffles. Just to be on the safe side, the pediatrician suggested bringing him in for a checkup.

They never made it there. After strapping Cameron into his car seat, Bill notic...

AHA News: Not Just Bad Shoes and Sore Muscles – She Had Peripheral Artery Disease

Abigail Dudek celebrated her 40th birthday in Las Vegas a few months ago, grateful to go hiking and cycling without pain for the first time in more than two years.

The problem started in April 2018. As her county's 911 public educator, she spent most the day on her feet at a public event. Although she was accustomed to achy feet, this time it felt different.

"It was like a hard pea ...

Show All Health News Results