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AHA News: Women and Men Tolerate Heart Transplants Equally Well, But Men May Get Better Hearts

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Women are just as likely as men to survive after a heart transplant despite often getting poorer-quality donor hearts, new research shows.

The findings, published this week in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, sought to shed new light on what role, if any, gender plays in surviving a he...

How Does Early Menopause Affect a Woman's Heart?

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Menopause before age 50 puts women at increased risk of nonfatal heart conditions, and the earlier menopause occurs, the greater the risk, new research suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 300,000 women who were part of 15 studies around the world, and found that women who reached menopause before age 50 were more likely to hav...

AHA News: Torn Between Work and Family? It May Not Be Good for Heart Health

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When family demands affect work performance or work demands undermine family obligations, the resulting stress may contribute to decreased heart health, particularly among women, a new study finds.

The study, published Thursday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds another factor for doctors and pati...

Losing Your Job Can Be a Real Heart Breaker

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money may not buy happiness, but a bigger paycheck is good for your heart. And new research suggests the reverse is also true: When income drops, your risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure goes up.

"One could argue that the fraying social and economic fabric of American society is, quite literally, killing us," said Dr. Edward Havr...

AHA News: High Triglycerides Caused a Diet Change – at Age 10

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Like many 10-year-olds, Lara Asch loved burgers and fries, pasta and pizza.

Although she was staying active with gym classes at school, plus tennis and dance, her body began to show signs she may not be healthy.

"My stomach was getting bigger and I just wasn't comfortable with that," she said.

Lara's parents, b...

AHA News: What's Your Sense of Purpose? The Answer May Affect Your Health

TUESDAY, Oct. 8, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When you fill out a medical form listing your health history, vital statistics and test results, there probably isn't a space for "sense of purpose."

Perhaps there should be. The term may be hard to quantify or define, but it can be a big factor in overall well-being, physical condition and even life expectancy.

"I...

Your Furry Best Friend Might Extend Your Life

TUESDAY, Oct. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Don't get too mad at that new puppy who piddled on the rug or chewed up your favorite slippers.

In the long run, that scamp is going to help you live a longer and healthier life.

A pair of new reports found that dog owners have a lower risk of early death than people without canine companionship, particularly when it comes to dying f...

Mummy's Curse: Heart Disease Is an Ancient Scourge

TUESDAY, Oct. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists are taking the wrappings off an age-old malady.

Clogged arteries are a heart problem that's dogged humanity for millennia, finds a new imaging study of mummies.

Mummified arterial tissue shows evidence of cholesterol plaque buildup in people who lived anywhere from 2000 BC to 1000 AD, said lead researcher Dr. Mohammad Madj...

AHA News: Can Being an Immigrant Be Hazardous to Your Health?

MONDAY, Oct. 7, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- In recent years, health care experts have warmed to the idea that lots of seemingly non-medical factors – income, housing, education – can significantly affect a person's health.

And many professionals now say one of those so-called social determinants of health, one that might affect a family for generations, is i...

Fewer Teeth, Higher Risk of Heart Disease?

FRIDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Losing teeth may be associated with higher risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers studied nearly 317,000 Americans between 40 and 79 years of age. They found that 28% of those who had lost all their teeth to gum disease also had heart problems, compared with 7% of those who kept all their teeth.

The researc...

Trying to Conceive? Both Dad and Mom Should Give Up Drinking in Months Before

FRIDAY, Oct. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women have long been told to cut out drinking if they are pregnant or think they might become pregnant.

But a new study suggests that men hoping to become fathers should also stay away from alcohol for at least six months before trying to conceive.

If would-be moms and dads drink in the three months before pregnancy, and if mom drinks...

AHA News: Understanding Bernie Sanders' Heart Treatment

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Sen. Bernie Sanders had no reported history of heart disease and had been keeping up an active presidential campaign schedule. But during an event Tuesday evening in Las Vegas, he experienced chest discomfort, his campaign said. Tests showed a blocked artery, and he had two stents implanted.

That experience, of going from ap...

Running the Numbers on High Blood Pressure

THURSDAY, Oct. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure is a risk factor for many serious health threats, such as heart attack and stroke.

The most recent guidelines from the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology and other health organizations reflect research findings that lowering the threshold for high blood pressure and starting treatment earlier d...

Cooling Cardiac Arrest Patients May Mean Better Long-Term Brain Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lowering the body temperature in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest helps a broader group of people than previously believed, a new French study finds.

For cardiac arrest patients with what's called a "nonshockable" rhythm, cooling the body almost doubles the odds they'll have good brain function if they survive, researchers have foun...

AHA News: 24-Year-Old's Fainting Was a Clue to Her Fatal Heart Condition

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 2, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Christie Tolosky went to her family doctor's office to get a prescription for a toothache. She collapsed and was dead within an hour, leaving doctors looking for clues about what happened to the otherwise healthy 24-year-old.

An autopsy revealed the answer. While planning the funeral, Barbara Tolosky, Christie's mother and ...

Stroke Rate Continues to Fall Among Older Americans

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Starting in the late 1980s, stroke rates among older Americans began to fall -- and the decline shows no signs of stopping, a new study finds.

The researchers found that between 1987 and 2017, the rate of stroke incidence among Americans aged 65 and older dropped by one-third per decade. The pattern has been steady, with no leveling off in rec...

AHA News: Make Neighborhoods Green for Heart Health? The Idea Is Taking Root

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Neighborhoods filled with trees, grass and other flora not only improve the air and clear the mind – they also can reduce heart disease risk, recent studies suggest.

Researchers say this may be more vital in low-income areas, whether that's an inner-city neighborhood swallowed up by concrete and metal or a suburb surrou...

Carnivores' Comeback: Review Supports Red Meat in Diet

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lurking dread in the back of the minds of many people who love steak, burgers and bacon -- the fear that what they enjoy eating might not be doing their health any favors.

But a major new review argues that folks can set those fears aside.

Cutting back on consumption of red meat or processed meat will not significantly red...

Fish Oil Supplements May Do Your Heart Good

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans pop a fish oil supplement each day, hoping to bolster their heart health. Now, research suggests they may be on the right track.

The most up-to-date review of data from 13 prior studies found daily omega-3 fish oil supplement use tied to a significant lowering of risk for heart attack, according to a team led by Dr. JoAn...

AHA News: His Heart Stopped. But His Golf Cart Kept Going

FRIDAY, Sept. 27, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- On a sunny April day in 2018, Bill Doss pushed through his exhaustion and met his buddies for their regular round of golf. As he headed to the final tee, he was rounding a turn in his cart and his world went black.

His heart had stopped. But his cart kept going.

The runaway cart careened over the green, ripping up...

Heavy Exposure to Pesticides May Boost Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Working around high levels of pesticides may translate into a high risk for heart trouble later, a new study suggests.

That was the case for a group of Japanese-American men in Hawaii who were followed for more than three decades. Compared to men who had not worked around pesticides, those who had the greatest exposure had a 45% higher ri...

Mental Ills May Put Veterans at Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Veterans who suffer from depression, anxiety, psychosis or bipolar disorder are more likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or die from heart disease, a new study finds.

Those who have most severe mental health problems, such as schizophrenia, are at greatest risk.

Although it's unclear how mental problems affect heart disease r...

More Hot Flashes Could Mean Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women, if you're bothered by frequent hot flashes, it may be more than a mere annoyance.

New research offers evidence that frequent or persistent hot flashes are linked to higher odds of heart attack and stroke. The finding stems from a 20-year study of about 3,300 women during menopause.

Of those women, 231 had a heart attack, str...

Does Parents' Smoking Raise Future Heart Risks for Kids?

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When parents smoke, their kids may face a higher risk of a common heart rhythm problem decades later, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that adults who grew up with smokers were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation, versus those with nonsmoking parents.

Atrial fibrillation (or "a-fib") is a heart arrhythmia in which the ...

AHA News: Adopted Baby's Unexpected Heart Problem Brought Unexpected Joy

FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When their hopes of adopting a child from China were stretched thin by years of wait, Vanessa and Chris Zoog asked for a baby with a physical issue – one who could use an extra dollop of love. Doing so, they learned, would expedite the adoption process.

The New Jersey family, which includes their son Noah, talked about...

Scientists Discover New Way Fat Harms Your Arteries

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists may have found a way that obesity directly damages the arteries and contributes to heart disease -- a discovery that they say could eventually lead to new treatments.

The British researchers found that in heart disease patients who are obese, body fat surrounding the arteries tends to secrete high amounts of a protein called WNT5...

AHA News: These Diets Helped Women With Diabetes Cut Heart Attack, Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Eating patterns similar to the Mediterranean diet and the blood pressure-lowering DASH may help older women with Type 2 diabetes ward off heart attacks, strokes and related problems, new research suggests.

Diabetes afflicts one-quarter of Americans 65 and older. An estimated 68% of these patients will die of heart dise...

Intense Gaming Can Trigger Irregular Heartbeat, Fainting in Some Players

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Video games that guarantee heart-stopping action might come dangerously close to fulfilling that promise in some players.

A handful of video gamers have passed out when intense sessions caused their heartbeat to lapse into an irregular rhythm known as an arrhythmia, researchers report.

Three boys between the ages of 10 and 15 sep...

Opioid Epidemic Tied to Doubling of Dangerous Heart Infections

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Addiction and overdose deaths aren't the only consequence of America's opioid epidemic. Cases of a potentially deadly heart infection have risen alarmingly, too, a new study finds.

This bacterial infection, called infective endocarditis, often affects young, poor white men who share needles. Many also have HIV, hepatitis C and alcohol abus...

Radiation Rx Might Ease a Dangerous Irregular Heart Beat

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new technique that uses a targeted high dose of radiation seems to prevent recurrence of a potentially deadly heartbeat for at least two years, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

This irregular rhythm, called ventricular tachycardia (VT), occurs when the heart's lower chambers start to beat uncon...

AHA News: Vitamin D Is Good for the Bones, But What About the Heart?

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Vitamin D plays an important role in overall health, but if you've been taking supplements to strengthen your heart, recent research may disappoint you.

Although vitamin D is best known for its role in developing strong bones, low blood levels have been linked to an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. But recent st...

Could Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Still Help Some People?

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Debate over the benefits and drawbacks of daily low-dose aspirin has flared in recent years, with guidelines now generally urging against the regimen to prevent a first heart attack or stroke in healthy people.

But some people with good heart health still might benefit from taking daily low-dose aspirin, a new study from New Zealand argues.

Heart Attack Can Be More Lethal If Symptoms Are More Gradual

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients often take longer to seek help if they have gradual symptoms, which may put them at increased risk of death, researchers say.

Gradual symptoms begin with mild discomfort that slowly worsens, while abrupt symptoms are sudden and severe pain, according to authors of a study published Sept. 12 in the European Journal o...

Lung Cancer Screening Can Detect Other Smoking Ills

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- CT lung cancer screening can detect other serious smoking-related conditions, such as heart disease, osteoporosis and emphysema, researchers say.

Medical experts consider lung cancer screening an effective way to detect malignant tumors at earlier, more treatable stages. Now, new research suggests low-dose CT scans of the lungs could also i...

AHA News: How to Fix a Flint Neighborhood? 'Come at It From All Sides'

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- A music production studio, boxing lessons, employment programs, and health and wellness projects – just some of the elements it takes to reinvigorate a community.

It's the work of the Urban Renaissance Center in Flint, Mich., a nonprofit restoring life to Civic Park, a predominantly black neighborhood that has faced se...

How to Fight Hidden Causes of Inflammation

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tamping down inflammation is a must for people with a chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. But you can be exposed to damaging inflammation without having a specific medical condition.

Inflammation prevents the body from adequately reacting to stressors and puts the aging process on an unwanted fast track, increas...

Occasional Naps Do a Heart Good, Swiss Study Finds

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could grabbing a nap once or twice a week help you live longer?

A new study reports the occasional nap appears to cut in half people's risk of heart attack, strokes and heart disease, compared with folks who never nap.

But more frequent napping provided no benefit, researchers found.

"In fact, we found that frequent nappers...

HRT Could Benefit Younger Women After Hysterectomy

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen therapy may help younger women live longer after having their uterus and ovaries surgically removed, new research reports.

The study found that when women under 60 received hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after surgery, their risk of dying during the 18-year follow-up period decreased by almost one-third compared to women taking a ...

Having HIV May Heighten Stroke Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with HIV have a greatly increased risk of a common heart rhythm disorder that's a leading cause of stroke, a new study shows.

The increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) from HIV is similar to or higher than known risk factors such as diabetes and high blood pressure, according to researchers from the University of California, San Fr...

AHA News: Less TV, More Activity May Mean Extra Years Free of Heart Disease and Stroke

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- People who watch less TV and are physically active live more years free of heart disease, according to a new study.

Past research has shown people who are highly physically active tend to live more years free of cardiovascular disease. But researchers of a study published Monday in the Journal of the American Heart Associa...

'Hot' Yoga, Hula Dance Your Way to Healthy Blood Pressure

SATURDAY, Sept. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate exercise is known to improve blood pressure -- and that may include activities that are more exotic than a brisk walk, two preliminary studies suggest.

In one, researchers found that "hot" yoga classes lowered blood pressure in a small group of people with modestly elevated numbers. In the other, hula dan...

Aggressive Blood Pressure Treatment Does Not Put Seniors at Risk: Study

SATURDAY, Sept. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment to lower high blood pressure can decrease older adults' risk of sharp blood pressure drops that can cause dizziness and increase the likelihood of falling, a new study says.

It included more than 2,800 patients, average age 63, who had recently suffered a stroke.

Half received more ag...

AHA News: Scientists Find Biological Link Between High Blood Pressure and Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Researchers have identified a protein that may be a risk factor for both high blood pressure and breast cancer.

Previous studies have found women with high blood pressure have about a 15% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to women with normal blood pressure. High levels of the protein GRK4 (G-protein cou...

Even Small Improvements in Cholesterol, Blood Pressure Help Prevent Heart Attack

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Small, lasting changes in cholesterol and blood pressure levels can dramatically reduce the risk of heart disease and strokes over a lifetime, new research suggests.

The large study found that a combination of a drop in LDL cholesterol (the bad type) of 14 mg/dL and a 5 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressur...

AHA News: So You Think You Can Survive a Heart Attack? Nigel Lythgoe Tells His Story

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Reality TV brought fame and fortune to Nigel Lythgoe. So, it's no surprise he can spin entertaining tales about the real-life drama he experienced with his heart.

But the man once dubbed "Nasty Nigel" for his bluntness as a talent show judge sounded downright empathetic as he explained why he tells those tales.

...

AHA News: Do NFL Players' Hearts Take a Hit From Football?

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Tim Tyrrell talks about football like a man who loved every minute of his six years in the NFL. He relishes stories of the devastating hits he leveled. He's proud of the way he could get knocked out, shake it off and get right back into the game. He loved the "ridiculous" intensity of two-a-day practices, the steak-and-egg breakfasts...

Hurricane Dorian Can Wreak Havoc on Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Hurricane Dorian rolls up the southeastern coast of the United States, most in its path worry about having enough water, food and batteries to ride the storm out.

But the American Heart Association (AHA) warns that the high stress and trauma of such an event can also trigger heart trouble, especially among heart disease and stroke patie...

Exercise May Be of Extra Benefit to People With Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise benefits heart disease patients more than healthy people, according to a new study.

It found that while stepping up physical activity reduced the risk of death for people with and without heart disease, those with heart disease had greatest benefit. The more they exercised, the more their risk dropped.

The study in...

AHA News: Education Seems Tied to Death Risk for Heart Disease Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- How long people stay in school may play a significant role in predicting how well those with coronary heart disease will fare, according to new research that linked lower levels of school completion with a higher risk of heart attack and death.

Education level has been known to influence people's risk of developing cardiovas...

AHA News: She Appeared to Be a Healthy Athlete, But Nobody Had Checked Her Heart

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- One of the first things Sarah Jane Stallings did when she and her husband, Bo, took over the CrossFit gym in her hometown of Russellville, Arkansas, earlier this year was to start a Fit over Fifty program.

Sarah Jane, who goes by SJ, is young and strong, but she can relate to what it feels like to exercise when age is not on...

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