Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Dieting To Control Salt".

Health News Results - 14

Whether you're stopping at a casual fast-food place or sitting down to eat in a full-service restaurant, eating out is an easy way to fill up when you're hungry. But those meals may not deliver much nutritional value, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that 70% of fast-food meals consumed in the United States were of poor nutritional value. For full-service restaurants, ...

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease and other dangerous conditions, but it offers no early warning signs. That's why it's so important to have your pressure checked regularly.

You can take preventive steps to keep it in line by getting regular exercise and by adding foods that support a healthy blood pressure to your diet.

If you'...

If you often feel bloated after a meal, don't be too quick to blame high-fiber foods. The real culprit might surprise you.

Your gut may be rebelling because you're eating too much salt, a new study suggests.

"Sodium reduction is an important dietary intervention to reduce bloating symptoms and could be used to enhance compliance with healthful high-fiber diets," said study...

About two-thirds of Americans have taken steps to cut back on salt, according to the International Food Information Council Foundation.

This often starts with comparing labels and choosing foods -- from soups to canned veggies -- with less sodium. Here are four more steps that you can take to reduce your salt intake.

You know that processed red meats and lunch meat of all k...

As if you needed any more proof that fruits, vegetables and whole grains are good for you, a new study finds they may cut your chances of heart failure by 41%.

Conversely, the so-called Southern diet, which focuses on meats, fried and processed foods and lots of sweet tea, was tied to a 72% increased risk of heart failure.

"Eat more plants, limit red and processed me...

A long-running study questions the conventional wisdom that a healthy diet may help ward off dementia.

European researchers followed more than 8,200 middle-aged adults for 25 years -- looking at whether diet habits swayed the odds of being diagnosed with dementia. In the end, people who ate their fruits and vegetables were at no lower risk than those who favored sweets and steaks.

...

Young adults who eat a heart-healthy diet may also be protecting their brain in middle age, a new study suggests.

It included more than 2,600 participants who were an average age of 25 at enrollment and followed for 30 years. They were asked about their eating habits at the beginning of the study and again seven and 20 years later.

They were grouped according to how closely ...

Fast food fans today are ordering off menus that have grown more apt to make them fat.

Portion sizes have risen dramatically over the past three decades at the most popular fast food restaurants in the United States, a new study has found.

As a result, the amount of calories and excess sodium has also increased among fast food offerings, said lead author Megan McCrory, a res...

Every five years, the U.S. government updates its dietary guidelines based in part on new research, but always with the goal of disease prevention.

The 2015-2020 guidelines stress the need to shift to healthier foods and beverages. Although research links vegetables and fruits to a lower risk of many chronic illnesses and suggests they may protect against some cancers, roughly 3 out o...

For many, the start of the new year signals the start of a new diet. But what's the best way to eat if you want to lose weight?

For overall healthy eating, the best diet plan is the Mediterranean diet, according to U.S. News & World Report's annual diet review. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet was ranked second on the magaz...

A high-salt diet could raise your risk for a common heart rhythm disorder, new research suggests.

Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots or other complications. It affects millions of people worldwide and puts them at higher risk for stroke and, in rare cases, can lead to heart failure.

This study included 716 middle-ag...

There are a number of ways you can serve up a healthier Thanksgiving meal, a nutrition expert says.

"Cut back on boxed and premade processed foods by making more dishes from scratch," said Mindy Athas. She is an outpatient dietitian nutritionist at Carroll Hospital in Westminster, Md.

Good choices for fresh seasonal ingredients include pumpkin, sw...

Not all salads are created equal.

When you're choosing your bowl of greens this summer, you should know that three types contain more calories, sodium and fat than you may want, one dietitian says.

So, if you want to eat the healthiest salads possible, steer clear of taco salads, chef salads and Caesar salads.

Taco salads, especially those that come in shells, typi...

Evidence linking a Mediterranean diet to a slew of health benefits is extensive and growing, but new research finds Americans in some regions aren't taking to it.

The increasingly popular eating plan emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil while limiting red meat and other saturated fats, refined sugars and processed foods. The Mediterranean diet has been show...