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Health News Results - 143

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Got a stuffy nose? If you vape, that might be why.

Research in animals suggests vaping makes it harder to clear your nose of mucus, a new study reports.

Experiments in sheep showed electronic cigarette vapor can cause a condition called mucociliary dysfunction, which makes it harder to move mucus or phlegm. Sheep were chosen because ...

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden withdrawal from coffee and cigarettes can trigger symptoms that mimic serious disease, leading to unnecessary tests in hospital intensive care units, a new review concludes.

"Nicotine and caffeine are some of the most commonly used and highly addictive substances in modern society, but they are often overlooked as a potential source of ...

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's no such thing as a safe cigarette, but unfiltered cigarettes are even more likely to kill you, a new study finds.

People who smoke unfiltered cigarettes have double the risk of lung cancer death that other smokers do. And smoking unfiltered cigs was also linked to a 30% higher risk of dying from any cause.

"All cigarett...

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Juul became the dominant brand of e-cigarettes in the United States by targeting teens with its clever use of social media, a new study suggests.

Nearly 70% of U.S. e-cigarette sales are Juul products, and most vapers are teens and young adults. The study determined that nearly half of Juul's Twitter followers are under age 18, with the maj...

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're an older woman who smokes, quitting may bring a health benefit you haven't considered: A new study suggests it lowers your risk of bladder cancer.

The largest decline in risk was in the first 10 years after quitting, with a modest but steady decline in following years.

Bladder cancer is fairly rare -- about 4.6% of new c...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday announced it will allow the sale of controversial "heat-not-burn" tobacco devices, but only under tight restrictions aimed at keeping the devices out of the hands of youths.

Called IQOS and marketed by Philip Morris, the devices warm tobacco to 500 degrees Fahrenheit, so it can be inhaled as ...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who use both traditional and electronic cigarettes may be trying harder to quit smoking than those who only smoke regular cigarettes, researchers report.

"Our findings suggest that smoking parents who start using e-cigarettes may have done so out of a desire to quit smoking," said study author Emara Nabi-Burza, from Massachusetts Gen...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As e-cigarette use soars in high schools across America, new research shows many people don't understand the amount of addictive nicotine they're inhaling with every puff.

In a new survey, many teens said they regularly used e-cigarettes, but swore they only vaped nicotine-free products.

However, urine tests for a "marker" of nicoti...

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just a 1% decrease in the number of Medicaid recipients who smoke could save the insurance program billions of dollars a year, a new study suggests.

Over one year, that small decline in smoking and its associated health harms would lead to $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year and millions for each state, researchers f...

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments mean aneurysms are no longer an automatic death sentence, specialists say.

Aneurysms are a weakening or bulging of blood vessels that can rupture and become life-threatening. They can occur anywhere in the body, but are most common in the brain, or in the main blood vessels that lead to the heart, legs and arms.

Aneur...

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could quitting tobacco involve something as simple as a pleasant scent?

New research suggests it's possible.

U.S. smoking rates have fallen over the past 50 years, but about 40 million Americans still smoke, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At least half of adult smokers report trying to qu...

WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans who want to quit smoking aren't sure how, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

Tobacco use is the nation's leading preventable cause of death, claiming more than 480,000 lives a year.

Nearly 70% of current smokers say they want to quit, but many try to do it cold turkey and fail. The FDA says over-the-cou...

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As electronic cigarettes took off, some worried they would lead teens back to traditional cigarettes. But new research suggests that's not the case.

Vaping has done little to slow or reverse a two-decade decline in the popularity of regular cigarettes among youth, a British study suggests.

"Given the important contribution to public ...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Amid growing concern about the safety of e-cigarettes, more American adults now believe vaping is just as dangerous as smoking cigarettes.

Between 2012 and 2017, the number of people who considered e-cigarettes less harmful than tobacco cigarettes dropped significantly, according to an analysis of two surveys.

In one, the percentag...

SUNDAY, March 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers-to-be who expose their pregnant partners to secondhand smoke put their babies at risk of heart defects, researchers warn.

For the new study, investigators in China reviewed 125 studies that included a total of nearly 9 million prospective parents and more than 137,000 babies with congenital heart defects.

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Responding to the steep, recent rise in the use of addictive e-cigarettes among kids, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday announced it would go ahead with efforts to restrict sales of some types of flavored vaping products to minors.

The new restrictions were first announced in November. Under the rules, most forms of flavo...

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Making sure electronic cigarettes don't get into the hands of youngsters is the key to beating tobacco use and nicotine addiction in the United States, a new American Heart Association policy statement says.

The statement authors said the tobacco industry's aggressive targeting of youngsters has led to a sharp rise in the use of e-cigaret...

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- African-Americans who smoke cigarettes are twice as likely to have a stroke than those who avoid tobacco, according to new research.

Previous studies have shown that, overall, African-Americans between ages 45 and 64 have two to three times the risk of stroke compared to white people. But there has been little research on lin...

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hookah users inhale high levels of toxic chemicals that endanger the heart and blood vessels.

That's the stark warning in a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement.

A single half-hour session of smoking tobacco in a hookah typically exposes the user to more carbon monoxide than a single cigarette. Even short-term ex...

MONDAY, March 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Monday it is turning up the heat on retailers that continue to illegally sell tobacco to teens.

First, the agency said it is asking Walgreen Co. for a meeting to "discuss whether there is a corporate-wide issue related to their stores' track record of violating the law by illegally selling tobacco pro...

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma patients who are recent and current smokers have lower survival rates than nonsmokers, suggesting that smoking may weaken immune response to the most deadly skin cancer, researchers say.

In a study of more than 700 melanoma patients in the United Kingdom, smokers were 40 percent less likely to survive melanoma than people who hadn't ...

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If life looks gray and cloudy when you smoke, you might not be imagining it.

Heavy smoking may actually damage color and contrast vision, researchers report.

They looked at 71 healthy people who smoked fewer than 15 cigarettes in their lives and 63 people who smoked more than 20 cigarettes a day. The participants were aged 25 to 45 a...

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people living with Parkinson's disease worldwide could double in the next two decades, experts project.

In a report warning of a possible Parkinson's "pandemic," researchers say the stage is set for cases to surge to 12 million or more by 2040.

What's to blame? In large part, trends that are generally positive: Older a...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- By itself, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) doesn't raise the risk of heart disease for U.S. veterans, a new study finds.

"Instead, a combination of physical disorders, psychiatric disorders and smoking -- that are more common in patients with PTSD versus without PTSD -- appear to explain the association between PTSD and developing car...

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients are already fighting a tough battle, so quitting smoking while doing so is a real challenge.

Now, research from Northwestern University in Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania shows that a combo of counseling and extended use of an anti-smoking medication can boost their odds for success.

One lung cancer patient ...

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many inmates in U.S. state prisons who want to quit smoking have nowhere to turn for help, a new study finds.

That increases their risk of smoking-related diseases, including cancer, heart disease and stroke.

And the risk is especially high for black men, who are six times more likely to be imprisoned than non-Hispanic white men. The...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases black Americans' risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study warns.

PAD -- a narrowing of arteries that provide blood to the arms, legs, brain and other organs such as the kidneys -- can lead to stroke, kidney failure, erectile dysfunction, pain in the legs when walking and loss of limbs.

Black Americans a...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Strong limits on marketing and sales are needed to control and prevent teens' use of electronic cigarettes, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says.

Teens who use e-cigarettes are more apt to use traditional cigarettes eventually, studies show.

The surge in vaping among American teens threatens to turn back fiv...

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you shy away from risky business or cast caution aside and go for it?

Either way, your answer could come from your DNA.

Scientists have identified more than 100 genetic variants linked with risk-taking, according to a groundbreaking new study.

"Genetic variants that are associated with overall risk tolerance -- a measu...

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- While cigarette smoking has hit an all-time low, another form of tobacco use is rising in popularity -- hookah smoking -- and researchers are concerned there's a new epidemic brewing, especially among young adults.

Once seen as an exotic pastime and cultural phenomenon in the Middle East, hookah smoking spread to Europe and North...

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Quitting smoking is one of the hardest things to do, but studies have found that one strategy in particular can help many people: Start anti-smoking medication well before your intended quit date.

Under traditional prescribing guidelines, people who plan to quit smoking with the help of a medication begin taking their anti-smoking drug about o...

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarette users take in lower levels of potentially harmful compounds than smokers, a new study shows.

But e-cigarette users are exposed to much higher levels of these compounds than people who don't use the devices and don't smoke.

"The findings are striking, because we now have solid evidence that e-cigarettes -- while ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite three decades of declines in secondhand smoke exposure, 58 million Americans -- children included -- are still breathing in tobacco fumes, federal health officials reported Thursday.

Nearly 40 percent of children aged 3 to 11 are exposed to secondhand smoke, as are nearly 50 percent of the poor and almost 40 percent of people living i...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Nobody knows who first said, "To succeed, you first have to fail." But it's a phrase many smokers likely relate to.

About half of all smokers try to quit each year, according to federal data. But only about 7 percent are successful.

"We've heard about people who say, 'That's it!' and they stop for good. But that's p...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The advent of the e-cigarette appears to have spurred a huge drop in tobacco smoking rates among teenagers and young adults, a new study claims.

Previous research has argued that vaping could prove to be a gateway drug for smoking, by getting youngsters hooked on nicotine and used to the physical actions associated with smoking.

In...

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking rates have dropped to the lowest level ever recorded, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

"This new all-time low in cigarette smoking among U.S. adults is a tremendous public health accomplishment -- and it demonstrates the importance of continued proven strategies to reduce smoking," CDC Director Robert Redfield said i...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the well-known dangers of smoking, the sizable benefits of quitting may be overlooked, a new study suggests.

"These findings underscore the benefits of quitting smoking within five years, which is a 38 percent lower risk of a heart attack, stroke or other forms of cardiovascular disease," said study author Meredith Duncan, from Vanderb...

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking a hookah may be as damaging to blood vessels as smoking cigarettes, a new study suggests.

Hookahs, also known as water pipes, have been touted as a harmless alternative to cigarettes, but researchers found that blood vessels were affected in the same way. In addition, when hookah water is heated with charcoal, a marked increase in carbo...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- When Rafe Poirrier smoked cigarettes, he smoked as soon as he woke, after eating, while driving, and whenever he took a break at work.

"I think my favorite (part) was socializing -- hanging out with smokers outside an office building, at a bar or in a park," said Poirrier, 51, of Houston.

Physical cravings, combined wi...

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking electronic cigarettes could slow the healing of skin wounds as much as regular cigarettes, according to a new study on rats.

"Based on our findings, e-cigarettes are not a safe alternative to traditional cigarettes as it relates to timely wound healing," said study corresponding author Dr. Jeffrey Spiegel. He's chief of facial plasti...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A ban on menthol cigarettes in one Canadian province did not trigger a rise in the sales of illegal cigarettes that was predicted by the tobacco industry, a new study shows.

When Nova Scotia became the first jurisdiction in the world to ban menthol cigarettes in May 2015, the tobacco industry claimed that "the primary effect of this law wil...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The science behind why it's so difficult to quit smoking is crystal clear: Nicotine is addictive -- reportedly as addictive as cocaine or heroin.

Yet any adult can stroll into a drug store and buy a pack of cigarettes, no questions asked.

"From a scientific standpoint, nicotine is just as hard, or harder, to quit tha...

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to popular belief, heart surgery patients who leave the hospital on a weekend or holiday do not have a higher risk for readmission, a new study finds.

Some studies have reported the readmission rate after major heart surgery is as high as 22 percent.

Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles looked at approx...

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The list of health risks linked to smoking continues to grow.

A small study reports that, aside from lung cancer, emphysema and heart disease, cigarette smokers also have weakened immune systems affecting their dental health.

Scientists from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine found that smoking reduces the ab...

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Melvin Stubbs knows smoking cigarettes could give him heart disease, lung cancer or kill him. He said his habit hurts his wife and parents, who often urge him to quit.

"That's one thing I struggle with on a daily basis," said Stubbs, 38, a smoker for almost two decades. "You know if you don't stop how many loved ones will be up...

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Nicotine replacement therapy appears to be a safe option for smokers hospitalized for heart disease, even for critically ill patients on their first day, according to a new study.

Researchers hope the findings will encourage doctors to prescribe nicotine patches or other replacement therapies more often during a window when patien...

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even low levels of air pollution can pose a threat to the lungs of cigarette smokers, researchers say.

They tested 29 nonsmokers, 71 smokers without lung disease, and 58 smokers with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The study found that the lungs of both groups of smokers could be harmed by levels of ...

THURSDAY, Aug. 30, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- More and more Americans are putting out their cigarettes -- for good.

The overall cigarette smoking rate among U.S. adults has hit an all-time low, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preliminary data from the National Health Interview Survey showed that smoking rates declined from 15.5 percent in 2...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The way that U.S. regulators try to find stores that illegally sell tobacco products to minors doesn't work, a new study contends.

The approach involves an undercover minor trying to make a single attempt at a store to buy tobacco products.

In this study, researchers hired minors and monitored them as they tried to buy tobacco pro...

TUESDAY, Aug. 28, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- John Jaramillo was a 45-year-old newly divorced single dad to 7-year-old Zeph.

As if that weren't enough to deal with, he was also having excruciating pain in his jaw, neck and shoulder.

Having used tobacco for 30 years, Jaramillo figured that was to blame. So in 2010, he kicked the habit -- cold turkey.

"I ...

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Wellness Library Results - 29

Smokers with digestive trouble often blame their diet, stress, bad luck -- anything but their cigarettes. After all, the stomach is a long way from the lungs. Or so it seems. You won't read it on the Surgeon General's warning, but the fact remains: Smoking is hazardous to your entire digestive system. If you're a smoker, think of that pain in your stomach or burning in your chest as a wake-up cal...

In the Roaring '20s and beyond, smoking was promoted to women as a diet aid. "Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet," one ad for Lucky Strike cigarettes proclaimed. Another Lucky ad, which appeared in 1934, shows a svelte woman on a diving board shadowed by an obese one. "Is this you five years from now?" the ad copy warned. Somehow, smoking, it was implied, would ward off the lovely woman's fat al...

With millions of people in the vise grip of a tobacco addiction, it's little wonder we're inundated with products and programs to help smokers quit. Nor does it come as a surprise that many are turning to alternative therapies in their fight to kick nicotine. Whatever method you try, nothing is going to work without some will power and a strong desire to stop. Whether you're trying to quit cold tu...

Okay, so the nicotine patches and gum didn't work. Somebody suggests hypnosis, but having someone experiment with your brain doesn't sound appealing right now. Maybe it's time to try a little group support. That's what Susan Gosden, did. Desperate to stop smoking, she found inspiration -- and release -- in a smoking cessation group held by Kaiser Permanente. Nine months after attending the 10-week...

They say that cigarettes can be harder to kick than heroin. From what we hear that's true and then some. Because it's so difficult but so essential, we asked people we know to describe how they quit and what it felt like. Although quitting was a triumph for everyone, some still see themselves smoking in their dreams. One writer is hoping there's a smoking section in heaven where he can light up wi...

The irony was as inescapable as the smoke. Here was Taku Ronsman choking on secondhand smoke at work every day in a city health department, where she gave advice on how to create a smoke-free workplace. Hard at work for the Brown County Tobacco-Free Coalition in Green Bay, Wisconsin, she developed chronic bronchitis from the cigarette smoke down the hall. The building -- which also housed the Ame...

What's the difference between chewing and spit (or snuff) tobacco? Chewing tobacco ("chaw") is usually sold as leaf tobacco, and users place a large wad of it inside their cheek. Users, who tend to be older men, keep chewing tobacco in their mouths for several hours (the tell-tale bulge often gives them away). Snuff, which is much more common today, is a powdered tobacco that's usually sold in ca...

Rick Bender was 12 when he stuck the first pinch of snuff between his cheek and gum. He was 26 when doctors diagnosed him with oral cancer and removed half of his jaw, a third of his tongue, and part of his neck. "I always thought smokeless tobacco was the safer alternative to cigarettes," says Bender, now 38. "'Smokeless' sounds so harmless. You know, no smoke, no fire." An estimated 7.6 milli...

Certain sultry scenes from the great Hollywood classics have come to define our notion of glamor and elegance. Think of drop-dead gorgeous Lauren Bacall locking eyes with Humphrey Bogart as she takes a deep drag on her cigarette and exhales seductively, encircling him with smoke. Bacall may have been every man's ideal beauty in To Have and Have Not, but if she'd kept on smoking like that, she may ...

Linking cigarettes and cancer In the early 1960s, researchers at Brown and Williamson, one of the world's largest tobacco companies, made a sickening discovery: Smoking could cause lung cancer. In public, the company claimed cigarettes were perfectly safe. Behind closed doors, their scientists searched for ways to remove cancer-causing compounds from cigarettes. As their own internal documents sho...

Catch an R or PG-13-rated movie these days, and you're practically guaranteed to see three things: sex, violence, and cigarettes. Even on television, villains smoke to look more villainous, heroes smoke to look more heroic, and the extras smoke for "atmosphere." Cigarettes and cigarette advertising have even found their way into children's movies, such as 101 Dalmations, The Nutty Professor and H...

You probably know that drinking during pregnancy can cause birth defects in your unborn child. But do you know what smoking during pregnancy can do? To test yourself, choose which of the following are true if you smoke while you're pregnant: 1) You're more likely to give birth to a "preemie," a premature baby, who runs a greater risk of birth complications and serious illness. 2) You're more likel...

Why should I quit smoking? Because it could save your life. They don't call cigarettes "cancer sticks" and "coffin nails" for nothing. When you smoke, you're exposing yourself to more than 4,800 chemicals, including cyanide, benzene, and ammonia -- and at least 69 of those chemicals can cause cancer. Perhaps the best known is nicotine, an addictive compound that can make it ferociously hard to st...

I've never smoked. And while I'd like to attribute that to my innate wisdom and common sense, the credit truly belongs to my parents. They smoked like chimneys till I was about 9, then quit cold turkey. I survived -- barely. My dad, now 85, started smoking a pipe while he was a freshman at Cornell. "I did it mainly because it looked good," he recalls. It's a somewhat embarrassing admission for one...

As any cigar lover will tell you, cigars and cigarettes are in two different leagues. Cigarettes come with a warning label; cigars come with a fancy box. A cigarette might last five minutes; a good cigar can last an hour or more. While cigarette smoking has steadily declined over the years; cigar smoking has become more popular, increasing by more than 33 percent between 1996 and 2006. And, of cou...

What do corn silk, banana skins, and weeds have in common? People desperate for a smoke have used them all in improvised cigarettes. If something can be rolled up and smoked, you can bet somebody, somewhere, has rolled it up and smoked it. Most of these experiments don't get very far, but a few non-tobacco substances have managed to catch on. In fact, "alternative" cigarettes have become a boomin...

"Quitting smoking is easy," Mark Twain once said. "I've done it a thousand times." Maybe for you it's been dozens of times -- or only six or seven. But if you've tried and failed, it might be time to stop relying on willpower alone. Research has shown that a number of different stop-smoking aids, used in combination with counseling, can roughly double your chance of stubbing out that cigarette for...

Albert Einstein once remarked that pipe smoking "contributed to a somewhat calm and objective judgment in all human affairs." Whether the observation is true or not, pipe smoking has had many other famous devotees, among them Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the fictional Sherlock Homes, who often disappeared into a haze of pipe smoke while solving his cases. Today, pipes are still a symbol...

Like any other business, tobacco companies are always looking for ways to make their products stand out. Some claim to offer superior flavor, while others try to make their brands seem rugged or sexy. But one strategy is conspicuous for sheer boldness and effectiveness: As concerns about the health effects of smoking mount, many brands are scrambling to appear safer than the typical smoke. "Light"...

Most cigarette smokers know the dangers of tobacco. After all, the Surgeon General stamps a warning right on the pack. But what about the people sitting next to the smoker? What about his friends and coworkers? His children? Secondhand smoke doesn't come with a warning label. If it did, more smokers might try harder to kick their addiction. According to the best current estimates, secondhand smoke...

Like many heavy smokers, Steven "Bubba" Ash would love to quit. "It's messing up my whole life," he says. In addition to draining his finances, his pack-a-day habit is killing his stamina. He used to be a serious runner, but he just doesn't have the lungs anymore. Bubba is 15. The high school freshman from Plains, Montana, first started smoking when he was 10. "Both of my parents were heavy smoker...

In the Jazz Age, flappers wielded foot-long cigarette holders as emblems of panache and independence. During World War II, monthly ads with Chesterfield cigarette girls featured such stars as Betty Grable and Rita Hayworth. Twenty years later, the U.S. Surgeon General linked smoking and death, but images of cigarettes as symbols of feminine freedom, mystery, and sex appeal were by no means extingu...

Two strangers' eyes meet over the brief flare of a freshly lit match. A jazz chanteuse croons through a haze of smoke. Around midnight, a bartender clears away the islands of empty cocktail glasses and lipstick-smudged cigarette butts left in the revelers' wake. For generations, immortalized in Edward Hopper paintings and Humphrey Bogart movies, inseparable from the sounds of Miles Davis and Sarah...

Ray Lader used to be an ideal customer for the tobacco companies: He was 12-years-old, loyal to his brand, and addicted. But within a few years, he turned into a major thorn in their side. Like thousands of other youth in Florida, Lader became an activist in the Truth Campaign, an unprecedented, highly successful program to curb teen smoking. Lader has the perfect credentials for an anti-smoking ...

Everyone knows cigarettes can kill. By the time you reach middle age, you've probably known a smoker who has died or is dying of lung cancer. But the biggest threat from cigarettes isn't lung cancer or emphysema -- it's heart disease. Each year, in the United States alone, cigarettes are responsible for up to a third of all deaths from heart disease, according to the American Heart Association. O...

Smoking is a dangerous habit -- and not just for people who light up. Secondhand smoke contains many of the same irritants, toxins, and cancer-causing compounds that plague smokers. If you spend any time in smoke-filled bars, restaurants, homes, or offices, you should know the facts about this health hazard. Take this short quiz to test your secondhand smoke IQ. 1. According to the best current ...

At least 10 percent of American women smoke cigarettes during pregnancy, according to government statistics. Many don't understand the true dangers of smoking, and others simply don't know how to quit. How much do you know about smoking and pregnancy? Take this short quiz to find out. 1. Which of these complications is NOT more common among pregnant women who smoke? a. Macrosomia (an overly lar...

The hazards of smoking go far beyond lung cancer and heart disease. In fact, it would take microscopic print to list every potential warning on cigarette packages. Take this short quiz to see how much you know about the dangers of smoking. 1. Smoking raises the risk of many types of cancer. Which of these cancers has been linked to smoking? a. Cervical cancer b. Bladder cancer c. Pancreatic can...

Shortly after blood-sucking leeches went out of style, 19th-century doctors embraced an equally bizarre remedy for some ailments: cigarettes and pipes packed with tobacco. Amazingly, doctors often prescribed this "cure" to patients with asthma. According to the strange logic of old-time medicine, patients could breathe easier if they got enough healing smoke in their lungs. Setting the stage for...

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