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A new Dutch study is being hailed as proof of the need for annual CT screenings of former and current longtime smokers to reduce deaths from lung cancer.

Dr. Debra Dyer, a spokeswoman for the American College of Radiology and chair of radiology at National Jewish Health in Denver, called the findings "wonderful news."

"There's no doubt about the effectiveness" of annual CT ...

Combining an imaging technology with a new drug that "lights up" lung cancer cells may help surgeons spot hidden bits of cancer, a new study suggests.

The small, preliminary study found that the new combo -- dubbed intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) -- helped improve outcomes in surgeries of 1 out of 4 patients.

The drug used in IMI is called OTL38. The drug isn't yet ...

An immune system that's not functioning normally may lead to lung cancer in patients who don't smoke, a new study suggests.

"A strong immune system helps to keep inflammation under control and chronic inflammation is known to promote cancer," said co-author Rayjean Hung.

"Our research suggests that it's underlying dysfunction of immune regulation that can lead to lung cance...

A 29% drop in U.S. cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017 was driven by declines in deaths from four major cancers -- lung, colon, breast and prostate, according to the latest American Cancer Society (ACS) annual report.

Cancer deaths in the United States fell 2.2% between 2016 and 2017, the largest-ever single-year decrease.

That record drop was spurred by a rapid decl...

Obesity is seldom a friend to health, but in one medical context it might give patients a slight advantage, new research suggests.

Specifically, when Australian researchers looked at trials of atezolizumab, an immune system-based treatment for lung cancer, they found that the drug worked better in people who were overweight.

The trial involved more than 2,100 people with th...

Nikki Moreno had spent nearly a year struggling for breath, and nothing seemed to help.

Not the inhalers, not the antibiotics and other drugs. Nothing seemed to help her breathe, and nothing got rid of her constant cough.

It finally got so bad that she landed in the emergency room at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica.

Moreno was not prepared for the series of sho...

Natural compounds added to marijuana-derived vaping liquid produce toxic chemicals in the vapor that users inhale, a new lab study reports.

The compounds, known as terpenes, are added into pure THC distillations to dilute the product and provide the vapor with aroma and taste, said senior researcher Robert Strongin, a professor of organic chemistry at Portland State University in Ore...

Depression is common among lung cancer patients and can damage their quality of life and treatment outcomes, a new study indicates.

The findings suggest that doctors should screen lung cancer patients for depression and refer them for mental health care if necessary, said lead author Barbara Andersen, a professor of psychology at Ohio State University in Columbus.

"Depressio...

An epidemic of vaping by American teenagers shows no signs of stopping, with 2019 data finding more than a quarter (27.5%) of high school students using e-cigarettes.

The rate was somewhat lower, but still troubling, among middle school kids -- about 1 in every 10 vaped, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And just as happ...

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged from the hospital on Sunday after being admitted on Friday with chills and a fever.

The news of her recovery and return home was issued by a court spokeswoman, ABC News reported.

The 86-year-old was first evaluated on Friday at a hospital in Washington, D.C., after feeling unwell. She was then transferred to The...

Here's some worrisome news for folks who manage to survive a heart attack: New research suggests they might be far more vulnerable to developing cancer down the road.

People who suffered a heart health scare -- a heart attack, heart failure or a dangerously erratic heart rhythm -- had a more than sevenfold increased risk for subsequently developing cancer, compared to those with healt...

More Americans are surviving lung cancer in recent years, but very few people at high risk are getting the recommended screening.

Those are the highlights from the latest "State of Lung Cancer" report from the American Lung Association (ALA), published Nov. 13.

There are positive trends, including the survival numbers: Compared with a decade ago, the five-year survival rate ...

Only two-thirds of lung cancer patients in the United States get the minimal recommended treatment, a new study finds.

And race and age appear to play a role in who gets the best care, the researchers said.

Black patients were only 78% as likely to receive the minimum care, compared with white patients, the findings showed. Meanwhile, those aged 80 and older were onl...

Could a person's risk for lung cancer someday be determined with a quick swab of the nose?

If the preliminary findings of a new study are any indication, it's a distinct possibility.

The experimental nasal swab relies on the fact that most lung cancer patients are current and former smokers. It's meant to be a noninvasive means of separating high-risk patients from low-risk ...

Rising rates of obesity and diabetes could be pushing up rates of pancreatic cancer across the globe, a new report suggests.

Global rates of colon cancer are also on the rise, although fewer cases are now proving deadly, researchers said.

Colon cancer rates and pancreatic cancer deaths rose by 10% worldwide between 1990 and 2017, according to a new study of global trends...

As concerns about baby powder being contaminated with asbestos mount, a new study finds a link between such contamination and a rare and deadly cancer.

A group of 33 people developed mesothelioma after long-term use of talcum powder and no exposure to other sources of asbestos, the report stated.

"All of them had significant exposure to talcum powder," said lead researcher D...

Even light smoking causes long-term damage to lungs, researchers warn.

In a new study, they compared lung function -- how much air a person can breathe in and out -- from more than 25,000 people. The analysis included nonsmokers, light smokers (fewer than five cigarettes a day) and heavy smokers (more than 30 cigarettes a day).

The light smokers' lung function declined at a ...

The nicotine in e-cigarette vapor appears to cause cancer in mice, a new lab study suggests.

The proportion of mice who developed lung cancer after a year's exposure to nicotine-laced e-cigarette vapor was about four times that of mice who breathed only filtered air, the researchers found.

Mice exposed to the nicotine vapor were even more likely to develop pre-cancerous grow...

A tuberculosis vaccine commonly used in other parts of the world might reduce a person's risk of developing lung cancer if given early in childhood, a six-decade-long study reports.

The Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is the only vaccine approved for preventing tuberculosis (TB) -- a potentially fatal infectious disease that typically attacks the lungs. Because TB risk is low i...

If you are a senior who is poor or from a minority group, the chances may be higher that you could receive a cancer diagnosis in the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Cancer is typically diagnosed by a specialist, but 20% to 50% of cancers are only caught during an ER visit, researchers said.

"Emergency room detection of cancer provides a window to understanding ...

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose aspirin may improve survival odds for patients battling head/neck and lung cancer, two new studies suggest.

The first reviewed data on 460 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) or early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

That study concluded that taking a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug su...

As doctors race to determine what is causing sudden and severe lung illnesses among some vapers, new research discovers dangerously high levels of a known carcinogen in menthol-flavored electronic cigarettes.

The chemical (pulegone) is used as a menthol and mint flavoring, even though it was recently banned in foods, the researchers said.

"If pulegone is not allowed in food,...

CT lung cancer screening can detect other serious smoking-related conditions, such as heart disease, osteoporosis and emphysema, researchers say.

Medical experts consider lung cancer screening an effective way to detect malignant tumors at earlier, more treatable stages. Now, new research suggests low-dose CT scans of the lungs could also improve diagnosis and treatment of other smoki...

Health warnings on individual cigarettes could be a more powerful way to coax smokers to quit than warnings on packages, British researchers say.

They assessed the reactions of 120 smokers, 16 and older, to the warning "Smoking kills" printed on individual cigarettes.

Smokers said the warnings could potentially work.

They said a caution on each cigarette would exte...

Drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors can help certain patients with advanced lung cancer live longer and better. But high out-of-pocket costs might stand in the way, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that of 106 patients who started tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for advanced lung cancer, one-quarter with the highest out-of-pocket costs died sooner: They were more ...

Certain chemicals made by the body may have helped prevent lung disease in some first responders who were exposed to toxic dust after the World Trade Center was destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001, researchers say.

The investigators, from New York University School of Medicine, identified 30 metabolites -- chemicals made as the body breaks down fats, proteins and carbohydrates -- associated w...

The health profile of vaping just took another knock: New research suggests that e-cigarettes can cause the same lung changes that lead to emphysema in smokers.

Researchers tested lung fluid from 41 people -- nonsmokers, smokers and people who vape -- and found that the lungs of both smokers and vapers had elevated levels of protease enzymes, a precursor condition to emphysema in smok...

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has just finished treatment for pancreatic cancer, the U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday.

After the tumor was first diagnosed in late July, Ginsburg was given a three-week course of focused radiation at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, the court said in a statement. A bile duct stent was placed and the justice tolerated treatment w...

The oldest Americans have higher cancer screening rates but lower cancer survival rates than younger seniors, a new report shows.

Those 85 and older -- a group dubbed the oldest old -- are also less likely to have cancer surgery than their counterparts between 65 and 84 years of age.

Adults aged 85 and up are the fastest-growing age group in the United States, yet relatively...

Even if it takes multiple attempts, a majority of smokers do finally kick the habit. But new research finds the percentage of smokers who are even trying to quit has flatlined.

Between 2001 and 2013, the rate of quit attempts rose steadily among U.S. smokers. But newer data, for the years 2011 to 2017, finds that "most states experienced no change in quit attempt prevalence," accordin...

When a hurricane strikes, as tropical storm Barry did this weekend in Louisiana, most people worry about the immediate health dangers such a storm poses.

But new research suggests that the interruptions in radiation therapy caused by power outages may also lower the chances of long-term survival among lung cancer patients.

"While we could not analyze every potentially expla...

A newer form of lung cancer screening may mean fewer deaths from the disease, a new study contends.

Using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) instead of X-rays helped reduce lung cancer deaths in current and former smokers, the study authors said.

"Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and early detection and treatment through screening with low-dose c...

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple sclerosis is a tough disease to manage and live with, but a new, long-running Norwegian study suggests it might also raise cancer risk.

Overall, the higher risk was small -- just 12%. However, the risk of certain cancers -- such as central nervous system (brain, spinal cord and optic nerve) cancers and urinary cancers were around ...

Radiation treatment for lung cancer can help extend lives, but it might also raise a patient's odds for heart attacks and heart failure, a new study shows.

Many patients may have no choice but to accept the risk: For about half of people diagnosed with the number one cancer killer, radiation remains the only viable treatment, the research team noted.

"This is alarming data -...

A gene-based blood test can accurately detect breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, gastric or bile duct cancers in patients, researchers report.

The test uses artificial intelligence to identify and interpret "fragments" of DNA in the blood that indicate the presence of cancer, explained researchers led by Dr. Victor Velculescu. He helps direct the Cancer Biology Program at ...

There's no such thing as a safe cigarette, but unfiltered cigarettes are even more likely to kill you, a new study finds.

People who smoke unfiltered cigarettes have double the risk of lung cancer death that other smokers do. And smoking unfiltered cigs was also linked to a 30% higher risk of dying from any cause.

"All cigarettes are bad. They all increase the risk for l...

Severely damaged lungs can be regenerated to be suitable for transplantation, researchers say.

A transplant is the only lifesaving treatment for people with end-stage lung disease, but donor organs are in short supply.

Up to 80 percent of donor lungs are rejected due to serious but potentially reversible injuries. Researchers hope to increase the supply of lungs available fo...

Learning more about firefighters' increased risk for certain cancers is the aim of a voluntary registry being created by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

It's seeking more than 1.1 million firefighters to participate in the National Firefighter Registry.

"Firefighters put their lives on the line to ensure our safety in emergencies, but ...

State Medicaid programs must do more to make sure that people at high risk for lung cancer are screened for the deadly disease, a new American Lung Association report says.

Medicaid is the public assistance program offering health care coverage for low-income Americans. Medicaid coverage for screening high-risk people varies widely between states: 31 Medicaid fee-for-service programs ...

The term artificial intelligence (AI) might bring to mind robots or self-driving cars. But one group of researchers is using a type of AI to improve lung cancer screening.

Screening is important for early diagnosis and improved survival odds, but the current lung cancer screening method has a 96 percent false positive rate.

But in the new study, investigators were able to re...

A blood test may one day replace invasive tissue biopsies as a pain-free way to guide treatment in lung cancer patients, new research suggests.

The so-called "liquid biopsy" can quickly identify tumor gene mutations that match targeted drug therapies -- potentially boosting patient survival.

The new findings present "a convincing argument for use of the liquid biopsy as a fi...

A new report from the American Cancer Society brings good news and bad news for black Americans.

The number of black lives lost to cancer is falling, the report finds, and at a faster rate than observed among whites. That's helping to close a decades-long "race gap" in cancer deaths between blacks and whites.

"Seeing the substantial progress made over the past several decade...

Over the past 25 years, the number of Americans who have died from cancer has dropped dramatically, though racial and economic disparities persist, a new study reveals.

Between 1991 and 2016, deaths from cancer dropped 27 percent. In real numbers, that's almost 2.6 million fewer cancer deaths, according to the American Cancer Society.

"The decline in deaths is largely driven...

A cancer diagnosis can be tough to take, and a new study finds many patients contemplate suicide.

That risk is most pronounced in the year following the diagnosis, researchers reported.

The risk for suicide among newly diagnosed cancer patients also varies by the type of cancer, they added.

"Both cancer and suicide are leading causes of death and present a major pu...

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been discharged from the hospital following surgery for lung cancer last week.

"Justice Ginsburg was discharged from the hospital yesterday and is recuperating at home," said Kathleen Arberg, public information officer for the Supreme Court, in an email to reporters on Wednesday.

Ginsburg, who is 85, had two cancerous nodule...

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent surgery for lung cancer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City on Friday.

"Two nodules in the lower lobe of her left lung were discovered incidentally during tests performed at George Washington University Hospital to diagnose and treat rib fractures sustained in a fall on November 7," court spokeswoman Kathl...

When Rafe Poirrier smoked cigarettes, he smoked as soon as he woke, after eating, while driving, and whenever he took a break at work.

"I think my favorite (part) was socializing -- hanging out with smokers outside an office building, at a bar or in a park," said Poirrier, 51, of Houston.

Physical cravings, combined with environmental, behavioral and personal triggers like...

Millions of Americans take angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to lower their blood pressure, but a new study suggests they might also increase their odds of developing lung cancer.

Among people taking these drugs for more than five years, the increased risk may be as high as 14 percent. Although that seems a small number, it could represent a large number of patients, the ...

Younger women who undergo chemotherapy for lung cancer are more likely to experience early menopause, researchers have found.

The new study included 182 women who were an average age of 43 when they were diagnosed with lung cancer.

Within a year, 64 percent of the 85 women who received systemic chemotherapy had entered menopause, compared with 15 percent of the 94 women who ...

Scientists say they're researching a way to destroy cancer cells that travel to other parts of the body.

Many cancers become especially dangerous only when they spread (metastasize) from the initial location to other tissues such as the lungs, brain or bone, the University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers explained.

The investigators found that when a crucial part of ce...