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Noninvasive Urine Test for Cervical Cancer Shows Promise

A new urine test might help doctors more easily screen for cervical cancer, researchers report.

The test looks for proteins generated by a type of cancer-causing human papillomavirus, HPV 16. 

HPV strains 16 and 18 are responsible for nearly all...

Time Between HPV Tests for Cervical Cancer Might Be Safely Extended

HPV testing to prevent cervical cancer might not have to happen as often as currently recommended, a new study says.

Current standards require women to undergo human papillomavirus (HPV) screening every five years. Nearly all cervical cancers are caused by HPV...

FDA Approves First Self-Test Collection Kit for HPV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a kit that will allow women to collect their own vaginal sample for HPV screening, a move that could increase early detection in those at risk for cervical cancer.

Women will be able to swab themselves in privacy at a doctor's office, clinic...

School Entry Rules Boost Kids' HPV Vaccination Rates

Getting the HPV shot in adolescence can spare kids a lifetime of risk for cervical and other cancers related to the virus, but only half of American kids are up-to-date on these shots.

Now, a new review suggests that if schools mandate HPV shots as an entry requirement for students, immunization rates rise.

"A majority of studies evaluating HPV vaccine school-entry requirements fou...

New Treatment Could Be Advance Against Cervical Precancers

Women who undergo regular Pap smears are no doubt familiar with the possibility of "precancerous" cells being detected.

These cells -- called cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) -- can progress to full-blown cervical cancers, but a new trial suggests that a vaginal suppository containing th...

New Federal Rule Means Hospitals Need Written Consent for Pelvic, Prostate Exams

In a letter sent to teaching hospitals and medical schools across the country, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Monday that written consent must be obtained from patients before performing sensitive procedures such as pelvis and prostate exams.

The agency noted that it "is aware of media reports, as well as medical and scientific literature, highlighting instances whe...

High-Risk Strains of HPV Could Raise Women's Odds for Heart Death

Women are four times more likely to die from heart disease and six times more likely to die from stroke if infected with a high-risk strain of human papillomavirus (HPV), a new study warns.

HPV already is known to cause most cervical cancers, and previous research has suggested that HPV infection might contribute to clogged arteries.

But this is the first study to draw a link betwee...

Cervical Cancer Rates Are on the Rise Among the Poor

Women in poorer areas of the United States have experienced a dramatic increase in advanced cervical cancer, a new study shows.

Late-stage cervical cancer cases and deaths have gone up in U.S. counties with an average household income of between $19,330 and $38,820, researchers report Jan. 25 in the International Jour...

Watch or Remove? Study Finds One Option May Be Better for Abnormal Cervical Lesions

When abnormal cervical cells are detected during a gynecological exam, it may be safer to remove them right away rather than "actively survey" the lesions and leave them in place, new research suggests.

In a study of over 27,500 Danish women, those who opted for active surveillance had higher long-term risks for cervical cancer, compared to women who'd had these suspicious lesions removed...

Best Way to Prevent Cervical Cancers: Immunize Boys Against HPV, Too

The best way to prevent cervical cancer in women is to give HPV vaccines to both boys and girls, a new study argues.

That way, herd immunity could help eradicate the cancer-causing virus, researchers say.

Cancer-related HPV strains declined significantly in Finnish towns where boys and girls both received the vaccine, according to findings published Nov. 8 in the journal

Cervical Cancer: What It Is, Symptoms and Treatment

Cervical cancer is a diagnosis no woman wants to receive, and navigating the disease can be challenging.

A type of cancer that starts in the cells of the cervix, this cancer usually develops slowly. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Before cancer appears in the cervix, the cells of the cervix go through changes known as dysplasia, which happens...

  • Angeles Alvarez Secord, MD, Gynecologic Oncologist, Duke Cancer Center/Duke University Hospital HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 9, 2023
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New Test Could Spot a Tough-to-Detect Cervical Cancer

A new test detects a type of cervical cancer often missed by a standard Pap test, providing an important advance in detection.

The test was developed by scientists at Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center in New York City.

“Our novel test appears sensitive for detecting cervical adenocarcinoma [ADC] — which now accounts for up to 25% of cervical cancer cases — as well as its precu...

The Women's Health Screenings and Preventive Care Appointments You Need

Health screenings and preventive care appointments are a key to maintaining long-term health and well-being. By proactively engaging in these practices, women can identify potential health risks early on and take necessary steps.

This guide will outline the key women's health screenings and care appointments to help you prioritize your health and stay on top of your well-being.

Awareness That HPV Causes Cancer Is Ebbing Among Americans

The sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause a range of cancers, but public awareness of this grim fact is slipping in the United States, a new survey finds.

While nearly 78% of respondents knew that HPV could cause cervical cancer in 2014, that dropped to about 70% in 2020, the investigators found.

The common virus can also cause oral, anal, vaginal, vulva and peni...

Mental Health Woes Double Women's Odds for Cervical Cancer

Women with mental illness have a risk for cervical cancer that's twice as high as that for others, according to new research.

Swedish researchers noted that women with mental illness, neuropsychiatric disability or substance abuse were also less likely to get screening tests that can detect cervical cancer.

“Our results suggest that women with these diagnoses participate more seld...

Many Women Over 65 Are Dying of Cervical Cancer. What Needs to Change?

A new study shows that many women diagnosed with and dying from cervical cancer are older than 65 -- a group for whom routine screening is usually not recommended.

Cervical cancer screening has been credited with a sharp drop in deaths from the disease in the decades since it was introduced in the United States. But current guidelines state that once a woman reaches 65, if she has been re...

U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Overall, But Prostate Cancers Make Rebound

Cancer deaths continue to decline, dropping 33% since 1991 and saving an estimated 3.8 million lives, according to the American Cancer Society's annual statistics report.

But individual trends within that overall success story highlight the struggle to find the best ways to prevent, detect and treat cancer for all Americans, the society said.

On the positive side, the United States ...

Preventing Cervical Cancer: An Expert Answers Your Questions

Cervical cancer is preventable, but people often feel uncomfortable talking about it because of its link to the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV).

Don't be embarrassed, a cancer expert advises.

Not only does your doctor want to help you, but the virus is incredibly common, affecting most American adults, according to

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 2, 2023
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  • Some Young Cancer Survivors Won't Get Cancer-Preventing HPV Vaccine

    Young cancer survivors face a heightened risk from human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus known to raise the risk of cervical cancer. So why are they getting the HPV vaccine in low numbers?

    To find out, researchers analyzed data from a clinical trial of the HPV vaccine among cancer survivors who were ages 9 to 26 and were one to five years from the completion of their cancer treatment.

    <...

    Many U.S. Seniors Get Needless, Pricey Cervical Cancer Screenings

    Researchers warn that high rates of cervical cancer screening in women over 65 suggest that some older Americans are being unnecessarily screened.

    More health data on these screenings in older women is needed to prevent potential harm and unnecessary costs, said the team from University of Illinois Chicago (UIC), University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the U.S. Centers for Dise...

    Too Often, Women Aren't Told of Sexual Side Effects of Cancer Treatments

    When a man has cancer in an area that affects sexual function, his doctor is likely to discuss it with him.

    But the same is not true for a woman who has cancer in a sex organ, according to new research. Investigators found 9 in 10 men were asked about their sexual health, yet only 1 in 10 women received the same care.

    "There seems to be a big disparity in the way we approach sexual...

    Vaccines Have Slashed Rates of HPV Infection in Young American Women

    Back in 2006, doctors began recommending the first vaccine for the common sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), with the shots carrying the potential to lower the risk of certain cancers.

    Now, a new study shows the vaccine has been wi...

    Cases of Advanced Cervical Cancer Keep Rising Among U.S. Women

    New research points to a conundrum with cervical cancer: While rates of early-stage disease have been dropping in the United States ever since the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was introduced, advanced cases have been on the rise.

    Which women are being hit the hardest? The steepest uptick in advanced cer...

    When Treating Cervical Lesions, Adding HPV Vaccine Could Further Curb Cancer Risk

    Most sexually active people will contract the human papillomavirus (HPV) during their lifetimes, and about 90% will clear it from their bodies. But some women are susceptible to the cervical lesions that infection brings, raising their risk for cervical cancer.

    Now, a new review finds it's possible that during surge...

    When Genes Raise a Mom's Risk for Cancer, Is It OK to Tell Kids?

    It's important to talk to kids about family health risks, but the impact of sharing this kind of information has been unclear.

    It's probably safe, according to a new study, but how are you supposed to do it -- and when?

    Researchers found that kids generally have no problem coping when cancer risk information is shared with them. But it's not uncommon for parents to struggle with com...

    Pandemic Caused Millions of U.S. Women to Skip Cancer Screenings

    Millions of U.S. women missed breast, cervical and colon cancer screenings due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

    It found that compared to 2018, the number of women in 2020 who said they had breast cancer screening in the past year fell by 2.13 million (6%). The number of women who ...

    HPV 'Herd Immunity' Now Helping Vaccinated, Unvaccinated Women

    Vaccination against the virus that causes most cervical cancers has spurred a widespread reduction of infections among young Americans - including those who are unvaccinated, a new government study finds.

    The study, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, looked at the impact of the nation's HPV...

    Study Finds Just One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Be Enough

    A single dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides as much protection against cervical cancer as the standard three-dose regimen, a new study finds.

    "These findings are a game-changer that may substantially reduce the incidence of HPV-attributable cervical cancer, and positions single-dose HPV vaccination as a high-value and high-impact public health intervention that is within ...

    COVID-19 Led to Dangerous Delays in Care for Women With Gynecologic Cancers

    A COVID-19 diagnosis can lead to potentially life-threatening treatment delays for women with gynecological cancers, a new study finds. That's especially true for non-white patients, the researchers said.

    "We found that concurrent COVID-19 had significant negative effects on these cancer patients, especially among those who identified as Black or Asian," said study leader Dr. Gretchen Gla...

    Women at Higher Odds for Side Effects From Some Cancer Treatments

    Gender differences extend to cancer treatments, with women having a higher risk of severe side effects from certain treatments than men, a new study finds.

    Previous research concluded women tend to have more side effects from chemotherapy, and this new paper shows the same is true for

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  • February 15, 2022
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  • Could a Pap Test Help Detect Breast, Ovarian Cancers, Too?

    Pap tests have long been used to detect cervical cancer early, but preliminary research suggests that cervical cells collected during those tests could also be used to catch other cancers, including deadly ovarian tumors.

    Researchers found that by analyzing a particular molecular "signature" in cervical...

    Many Teens Don't Realize STD Risks From Oral Sex: Poll

    Many American teens and young adults underestimate the risk of sexually transmitted infections from unprotected oral sex, and that's especially true of young men, a new survey shows.

    Doctors say oral sex can transmit herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cervical cancer, and head and neck cancers.

    While there is an

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Progress on Lung Cancer Drives Overall Decline in U.S. Cancer Deaths

    A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

    And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

    Still, lung cancer remai...

    You Can Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is the only gynecologic cancer that can be prevented, yet there were more than 4,000 deaths in the United States in 2021 and nearly 14,500 new cases, the American Cancer Society says.

    The best way to prevent this is to make sure you and your children get their human papillomavirus vaccines, experts noted.

    Nearly all cervical cancer stems from HPV, which will first c...

    HPV Vaccine Is Reducing Cervical Cancers in Teens, Young Women

    The first wave of girls to receive the HPV vaccine are much less likely to contract or die from cervical cancer than women just a few years older, a new study reports.

    Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), for which a vaccine has been available since 2006.

    Cervical cancer deaths and cases have fallen dramatically among 14- to 24-year-old women...

    Could a Single Dose of the HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

    Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

    The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high levels of HPV-related cancers and protect many more women more quickly.

    "These findings are a gamechanger that may s...

    HPV Vaccination Rises in States That Don't Require Parental Consent

    When young people are allowed to give their own consent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, vaccination rates are higher, new research shows.

    The new study suggests that allowing teens to consent without parental involvement could be an important strategy for boosting HPV vaccination rates. This consent is already a policy in several U.S. states.

    While researchers can't say def...

    HPV Vaccination When Young Cuts Cervical Cancer Risk by 87%

    The sooner girls are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), the lower their future risk of cervical cancer, a new study finds.

    Compared to unvaccinated women, the risk of cervical cancer was 87% lower among those who received the bivalent vaccine Cervarix at ages 12 or 13. By contrast, it was 62% lower in those who got the vaccine at ages 14-16 and 34% lower those vaccinated at ag...

    Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

    Just over a decade ago, the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) made many common cancer screenings free. But a pair of new studies caution that when those free tests turn up signs of trouble, important follow-up tests may be too pricey for some patients.

    The bigger concern: Some patients may forgo these expensive tests, even when they may prove lifesaving.

    "With t...

    Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

    Hispanic people in the United States have lower cancer rates than white people, but they are much more likely to develop certain preventable cancers.

    "The good news is that overall cancer rates are lower in Hispanic people, but we are seeing very high rates of infectious disease-related cancers, many of which are potentially avoidable," said study author Kimberly Miller, a scientist at th...

    Mixed Progress Against Cancers in Teens, Young Adults

    There's some encouraging news for U.S. teens and young adults with cancer.

    Survival rates have improved for several types of cancer, though gains have been limited for some common kinds, according to a long-term study published online July 26 in the journal Cancer.

    The researchers used a wealth of accumulated data "to piece together a larger part of the cancer survival st...

    Most Cancer Screenings Make Big Rebound After Pandemic Decline

    A major U.S. hospital system had a strong rebound in most cancer screening tests after a steep drop-off in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study shows.

    The findings are based on an analysis of data from the Boston-based Mass General Brigham system. Depending on the type of test, between March and June of 2020, the number of cancer screenings dropped off between 65% a...

    Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

    Many women in the United States aren't screened for cervical cancer because they can't afford it, a new study finds.

    Screening helps reduce cervical cancer cases and deaths, but disparities in screening rates exist based on income, insurance status, race and ethnicity.

    "Low-income women need greater access to insurance coverage options, Medicaid eligibility, or free screening progra...

    Women's Cancer Screenings Plummeted During Pandemic

    Breast and cervical cancer screenings dropped sharply among low-income minority women during the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

    That could lead to delayed cancer diagnoses, health consequences and an increase in existing disparities, the agency warned.

    The new findings "reinforce the need to safely maintain routine health care services d...

    Could a DNA Blood Test Spot a Range of Hidden Cancers?

    Could a new one-and-done blood test designed to detect as many as 50 different types of cancer become a diagnostic game changer?

    Yes, say researchers, who report the method appears accurate and reliable at identifying and locating cancer, including some kinds for which there are now no effective screening methods.

    "[The test] sets the stage for a new paradigm of screening individual...

    For People With Heart Failure, Statins May Lower Cancer Risk Too

    Many people with heart failure take a cholesterol-lowering statin, and new research suggests those pills might also lower their odds for cancer.

    Researchers analyzed data from more than 87,000 people in Hong Kong who had no history of cancer and were hospitalized for heart failure between 2003 and 2015.

    They were followed until they were diagnosed with cancer, died or until the end ...

    HPV Vaccination Is Lowering U.S. Cervical Cancer Rates

    In a finding that offers the first evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is indeed protecting women from cervical cancer, new research shows cases in the United States have slowly but steadily declined over the last decade and a half.

    However, other HPV-related cancers like anal, rectal and oral tumors continue to increase, suggesting that regular cancer screening also play...

    Urinary Incontinence Surgery Won't Raise a Woman's Cancer Risk

    Women face no increased risk of pelvic cancer -- tumors of the bladder, cervix and ovaries -- if they have surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a new study finds.

    Concerns about possible complications and safety issues related to use of surgical mesh -- particularly for a condition called pelvic organ prolapse, and also for SUI -- have made some patients reluctant to have m...

    HPV Infections Are Plummeting Due to Widespread Vaccination

    Fifteen years of widespread vaccination of U.S. children with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is reaping big rewards: A more than 80% drop in new infections has been seen in women and girls under the age of 25.

    That could mean an equally big drop to come in a host of dangerous conditions that are linked to HPV infection, including cancers of the cervix, anogenital area and mouth/th...

    When Heart Attack Strikes, Cancer Patients Often Miss Out on Lifesaving Treatment

    Too few cancer patients who have a heart attack are receiving emergency angioplasties that could save their lives, a new study finds.

    "This is an important study, which underscores the broader issue in cardio-oncology of cancer patients too often being passed over for potentially beneficial procedures," said Dr. Robert Copeland-Halperin, a cardiologist unconnected to the new research.

    ...