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The nation is in a state of shock and outrage over Wednesday's riotous siege on the U.S. Capitol Building by supporters of President Donald Trump, and there could be still worse to come before the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

So, taking care of your mental and physical health will be important in the coming days of trial and tribulation in the United States, American...

As 2020 comes to a close, many people plan to ring in the new year with a bit of bubbly.

But that can lead to calamity when not done safely, warns the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), which offers tips for keeping a Champagne toast from going wrong.

A warm bottle of Champagne paired with poor technique for opening it can send a cork flying up to 50 miles per hour, threatenin...

Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a strikingly high prevalence of attempted suicide, with women being at particular risk, researchers say.

The study of nearly 22,000 Canadian adults found that 14% of those with ADHD had attempted suicide. That was roughly five times the rate of adults without ADHD, at 2.7%.

The findings among women were particular...

Hurricanes, tornadoes and other major disasters can cause more damage than devastation to property, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that the severe emotional distress and anxiety for those who have lived through major disasters can also lead to suicide.

The authors examined 281 natural disasters during a 12-year period and their impact on suicide rates in those communities.<...

Sexual assault is common in America, with an attack occurring every 73 seconds. But having supportive care at the emergency department and afterwards can help heal the trauma, Penn State doctors say.

One in five women is raped during their lifetime, yet only 25% report it, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. The closer the relationship is between the vic...

At Rutgers New Jersey Medical School's trauma center, Dr. Stephanie Bonne and her team noticed a string of patient injuries caused by broken glass tables.

"They were quite serious, significant injuries that required pretty big operations and long hospital stays," said Bonne, who is an assistant professor of surgery and trauma medical director. "We wanted to see, is there anything that...

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)may significantly increase the risk of dementia later in life, according to a new study.

The researchers found that people with a history of PTSD were up to two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never had PTSD.

"Our study provides important new evidence of how traumatic experiences can impact brain health, and how the l...

Most Americans aren't confident that they could provide lifesaving help after mass violence or other emergencies, a nationwide poll shows.

While most respondents felt they could call 911 and about half said they could provide information to first responders, far fewer said they could do much more. Only 42% were confident they could provide first aid and 41% said they could app...

A rise in gun violence and a resulting increase in severe injury demand urgent action to curb these trends and lower the high cost of saving victims' lives, researchers say.

"We hope that our findings are able to better inform policy in terms of violence prevention as well as reimbursement to hospitals, which are often in underserved regions, that care for these patients," said Dr. Pe...

When police and National Guard troops mobilized during protests that broke out across the nation this spring following the death of George Floyd, they often resorted to the use of so-called "beanbag" rounds of ammunition when confronting crowds.

Beanbag rounds -- a small cloth bag filled with lead shot and fired from a standard shotgun -- are thought to be strong enough to cause pain ...

Trigger warnings are meant to alert trauma survivors about unsettling text or content that they might find potentially distressing.

But these words of caution at the start of films or books may provide no help at all -- and might even hamper a traumatized person's ability to grapple with deep psychological scars, a new study reports.

"We found that trigger warnings did not ...

You've watched police brutality protests unfold across America and you want to take part, but you fear that choice could raise your risk of coronavirus infection. Is there a way to express your outrage without endangering your health?

Yes, say doctors who offer tips on safely joining large protests on the streets of cities across the country.

"During this time when the Ameri...

Just as Americans are emerging from COVID-19 quarantines, hoping to resume normal life but still fearful of infection, protests against police violence are raging in cities across the country.

And millions remain unemployed, as a shaky economy attempts to restart.

How are folks expected to cope with all of this?

"For a lot of people, we might be reaching the breaki...

The way they're treated by other people can cause young burn survivors more distress than their physical challenges, two surveys find.

In one, researchers asked 64 burn survivors between 17 and 25 years of age what they found hardest to deal with. The seven most common responses: people staring; being bullied; memories of being burned; needing more surgeries; self-consciousness about ...

Padded helmets and safe tackling and blocking techniques can reduce the chance of head injuries for middle school football players, a new study finds.

Young athletes make up 70% of America's amateur and pro football players. As head injuries in older athletes have been linked to a slew of brain injuries, attention is now turning to the safety of the younger players.

Robe...

Many brain injury deaths could be prevented by using an inexpensive drug in the critical hours following a head trauma, a new international study finds.

"Traumatic brain injury can happen to anyone at any time, whether it's through an incident like a car crash or simply falling down the stairs," said study co-leader Ian Roberts, a professor of clinical trials at the London School of H...

Think the chances that your kid could be hit by a train are slim to none?

New research suggests you should think again.

Issued to coincide with "Rail Safety Week," the Sept. 23 report finds that, on average, a child dies of a train-related injury somewhere in the United States every five days. And for every death, another three children are injured.

The finding ind...

Eddie Sullivan, 17, woke up on a Tuesday and found that his chest hurt every time he took a breath.

He'd spent that July weekend nauseous with a fever, and the day before doctors had diagnosed him with pneumonia, remembers his mom, Geri Sullivan.

"As the day went on, his chest pain became more severe and his breathing became more labored," said Sullivan, 54, of Delaware Coun...

Kids who grow up confident that their parents, friends and community have their back are far less likely to struggle with depression or other serious mental health issues as adults, new research indicates.

The survey of nearly 6,200 adults also found that bad experiences, such as emotional or physical abuse, don't inevitably doom kids to a difficult adulthood. When children who have e...

When severe storms or hurricanes like Dorian sweep through communities with high winds and flooding, they can leave more than physical damage in their wake.

New research suggests that dealing with the aftermath -- which can include a damaged home and property -- puts people at high risk for depression, anxiety and other mental health problems.

"This study shows that exposure...

Holocaust survivors may have suffered permanent harmful changes to their brain structure, and the brains of their children and grandchildren may also be affected, a small study reveals.

"After more than 70 years, the impact of surviving the Holocaust on brain function is significant," said researcher Ivan Rektor, a neurologist from Brno, Czech Republic.

MRI scans of 28 Holoc...

"Broken heart syndrome" may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests.

While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive their cancer five years after diagnosis.

"There seems to be a st...

An air ambulance might be your only chance to survive a medical emergency -- but a new study reports it's going to cost you.

The median charge of an air ambulance trip was $39,000 in 2016, about 60% more than the $24,000 charged just four years earlier, researchers found.

That amount is "more than half of the household income for the average American family in 2016," sai...

Coming from a broken home or suffering abuse can traumatize a child, but new research suggests team sports might be just the medicine these kids need.

Tracking U.S. health data from nearly 10,000 people, researchers found that teens who experienced childhood trauma and played team sports had lower odds of depression and anxiety as young adults.

"As a pediatrician going thro...

A new study finds that a tourniquet used in war zones could save students' lives when gun violence strikes a campus.

The Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT), a cuff-like device that wraps around a limb to stop bleeding, was developed for adults, but this study of 36 boys and 24 girls found that it controlled blood flow in their arms and legs.

"Firearm injuries and death are ...

An easy-to-use, noninvasive device can detect early signs of the cancer complication known as lymphedema, a new study reports.

Lymphedema is the buildup of fluid in the body's tissues when a part of the lymph system is damaged, as can happen in cancer care, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI).

The fluid causes swelling, usually in the arms or legs, and can b...

For some people, the stress of dealing with a particularly rough patch in life or trauma may also strain the heart, a large new study suggests.

The research, based on over 1.6 million Swedish adults, found that those diagnosed with a stress-related disorder faced a higher risk of suffering a heart attack or other cardiovascular trouble over the next year.

The disorders range...

If you've ever been suddenly and unexpectedly reminded of a past trauma, you may wonder if those old fears will ever stop haunting you.

Now, neuroscientists say they've discovered a group of brain cells that control frightening memories, and they suggest that the finding could lead to new ways to treat anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The newly ...

The risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and teens is higher if they think their response to a traumatic event is abnormal, a new study indicates.

Most kids fully recover after a traumatic event, such as a car accident. But some develop PTSD that may endure for months, years or even into adulthood, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia in th...

So-called trigger warnings, which alert viewers and readers to potentially disturbing content, do little to reduce distress, a new study finds.

Such warnings are becoming increasingly common, especially at colleges, but there's little research evaluating their effectiveness, according to the study authors.

"We, like many others, were hearing new stories week upon week about ...

Abuse during childhood can cause structural changes in the brain that increase a person's risk of severe and recurrent depression, a new study reveals.

The findings "add further weight to the notion that patients with clinical depression who were mistreated as children are clinically distinct" from people who didn't suffer such trauma in early life, said study leader Nils Opel. He's a...

Black neighborhoods in America's three largest cities are much more likely to be located in a "trauma desert," an area without immediate access to a designated trauma center, a new study finds.

Census data for neighborhoods in New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles revealed that neighborhoods made up of mostly black residents are more often 5 miles or more away from a trauma center, ...

How fast emergency medical help arrives at the scene of a car crash plays a significant role in patient survival, a new study finds.

Reviewing U.S. collisions between 2013 and 2015, researchers blamed 14 percent of fatalities in cities and suburbs on slower-than-average EMS response times. Poor timing accounted for 10 percent of deaths in rural areas.

"Prehospital response t...

People who have experienced either a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury are twice as likely to commit suicide than others, a new review suggests.

The analysis also indicates that men and women who have had a concussion are also more likely to consider or attempt suicide.

The investigators stressed that the absolute risk of suicide for any one concussion patient rema...

People who've suffered major traumatic injuries are at much greater risk for mental health problems and suicide, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 19,000 people in the Canadian province of Ontario who suffered serious injuries. Most of the injuries (89 percent) were accidental rather than intentional (for example, car crashes and falls).

"Major trau...

After mass shootings like the one at a Pittsburgh synagogue just last weekend that left 11 dead and six wounded, Americans often rush to donate blood to help the victims.

But new research suggests that some of that blood could end up going to waste.

"There is an emotional desire after these events to immediately donate blood, but that's not always necessary and it's not alwa...

People directly exposed to the World Trade Center terrorist attacks appear at increased risk of drug- and alcohol-related death, a new study finds.

"Following a major disaster, alcohol- and drug-related mortality may be increased," said Dr. Jim Cone and colleagues of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on mo...

Gunshot wounds are far deadlier than other types of trauma, according to a new study.

Gunshot victims are five times more likely to need a blood transfusion. They also require 10 times more blood units than people involved in falls, car accidents, stabbings or other assaults, according to researchers from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

And they are 14 times likelier ...

Sexual assault leaves many women with permanent indelible memories, a new study finds.

Compared with other traumatic life-altering events, the memories of sexual assault remain intense and vivid for years, even when not linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the study authors said.

"To some extent, it is not surprising that these memories relate to more feelings ...

Traumatic brain injury can trigger a daily struggle with headaches, neck pain, dizziness and thinking problems that may drive some to suicide, researchers report.

That risk more than triples in the first six months after a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and it stays significantly higher over the long term, a new Danish study suggests.

The finding is based on an exhaustive re...

Strict regulation of semi-automatic guns, accessories and ammunition is needed to stop "senseless" gun violence in the United States, an association of trauma surgeons contends.

Guns are involved in more than 38,000 deaths and at least 85,000 non-fatal injuries every year in the United States, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) states in a policy statement. It w...

A single traumatic brain injury can raise a person's risk of dementia, a new study suggests.

"Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in young adults," said researcher Elisa Zanier, from the Mario Negri Institute in Milan, Italy.

"Moreover, even in milder cases, it represents a risk factor for dementia, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)...

Heading soccer balls poses a much greater threat to women's brains than men's, new research suggests.

The study included 49 female and 49 male amateur soccer players, aged 18 to 50. They reported a similar number of headings over the previous year (an average of 487 headings for the men and 469 for the women).

Brain scans revealed that regions of damaged white matter in the ...

Giving blood plasma to seriously injured patients en route by helicopter to the hospital can improve their chances of survival, a new study suggests.

The study, led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, included 500 trauma patients with severe bleeding.

"These results have the power to significantly alter trauma resuscitation, and their importance to the traum...