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TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of hepatitis C cases and related deaths could be prevented, but it will require a significant investment, researchers say.

In the first study to model such measures worldwide, the authors concluded that sweeping prevention, screening and treatment efforts could prevent 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of U.S. liver transplant recipients with alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) doubled over 15 years, but significant regional variations remain, a new study finds.

ALD has replaced hepatitis C as the most common reason for U.S. liver transplants. One reason is that hepatitis C rates have decreased due to antiviral therapy. ...

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Great Recession continues to take a grim toll: Since 2009, a growing number of Americans have died from liver disease and liver cancer.

The increase among 25- to 34-year-olds is especially troubling because the deaths are due to cirrhosis, a disease caused by excessive drinking, the authors of a new study said. The researchers suspect t...

WEDNESDAY, April 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity can lead to liver disease in kids as young as 8 years old, a new study warns.

The long-term study of 635 children in Massachusetts found that a bigger waist size at age 3 increases the odds that a child will have a marker for liver damage and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by age 8.

That marker is called ALT. By age 8, 2...

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Daily aspirin may reduce the risk of liver cancer for people with hepatitis B infection, a new study suggests.

Hepatitis B virus attacks the liver and can cause cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previous research suggests daily low-dose aspirin therapy may prevent cancer, but there is little clinical evidence on whether regular aspirin use can preve...

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they were able to coax tiny "seeds" of liver tissue into fully functioning livers in mice.

If this approach works in people, it could help reduce long wait lists for liver transplants. It might also benefit people with failing livers who don't quality for liver transplants, according to the researchers.

The scienti...