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Results for search "Diabetes: Diet".

21 Feb

Tree Nuts and Heart Health

A steady diet of tree nuts may lower the risk of heart disease among type 2 diabetics.

30 Nov

Fructose and Diabetes Risk

Fructose from fruits and vegetables doesn't appear to cause blood sugar problems.

Health News Results - 19

SATURDAY, June 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The kind of foods you eat, and even the order in which you eat them can affect your odds of developing type 2 diabetes, three new studies suggest.

The studies -- being presented to the American Society for Nutrition -- found:

  • Switching to a mostly plant-based diet (but one that could still include m...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes -- metformin -- may help people with pre-diabetes maintain long-term weight loss.

People who lost weight while taking metformin maintained a loss of about 6% of their body weight for six to 15 years. People who lost weight through lifestyle changes -- eating healthily a...

THURSDAY, April 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no one right diet for people with diabetes, and patients should instead have personalized nutrition plans, a new American Diabetes Association (ADA) report says.

There simply is no ideal percentage of calories from carbohydrates, proteins and fats. And combinations of different foods or food groups are acceptable for the management...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Keto, Paleo, Atkins -- there's no shortage of low-carb diets to try, but new research suggests that over time, living low-carb can raise your risk of a heart condition called atrial fibrillation, or a-fib.

People who regularly got fewer than 45 percent of their calories from carbohydrates were 18 percent more likely to develop a-fib than p...

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tax it, and fewer folks will buy it.

So it goes with sugar-sweetened drinks, new research suggests.

The California city of Berkeley introduced the nation's first soda tax in 2014, and within months people were buying 21 percent fewer sugary drinks. Three years later, 52 percent fewer of these drinks were being sold while consumpti...

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you've got a sweet tooth, but you're worried about type 2 diabetes, you might want to skip sugary drinks.

New research suggests that drinking sugar-sweetened beverages, such as cola, likely boost your risk of type 2 diabetes much more than the sugar found in fruit or even 100 percent fruit juices.

"All foods are not created equ...

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are many areas of the United States where doctors are in short supply, but the good news for diabetics is that nurse practitioners and physician assistants can often help fill that care gap.

In fact, new research compared the care given by doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants to people with diabetes and found no signific...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, but 90 percent of them don't know they have it, medical experts say.

Prediabetes often leads to type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems, including heart disease and stroke.

But research shows that people who know they have prediabetes are more likely to make lifestyle ch...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- 1 in 7 Americans has diabetes, and many don't even know they have the blood sugar disease, a new report shows.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14 percent of U.S adults have diabetes -- 10 percent know it and more than 4 percent are undiagnosed.

"Diabetes remains a chronic health problem in this ...

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It may seem counterintuitive, but eating bread, pasta and cereal may actually help prevent type 2 diabetes, as long as those foods are made from whole grains, new research suggests.

The study found that each serving of whole-grain foods per day was linked to as much as an 11 percent drop in the risk of type 2 diabetes.

"Whole grai...

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Putting just a bit less on your dinner plate each day might be key to a longer life, preliminary research suggests.

People who reduced their caloric intake by just 15 percent over two years experienced a significant decrease in their metabolism, according to a small clinical trial.

These folks also saw improvements in biomarkers ...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While you might think most people would try to change unhealthy behaviors after a major health scare like a stroke, new research suggests most people don't.

They may even pick up worse habits.

Fewer than 1 in 100 stroke survivors met all seven heart-health goals identified by the American Heart Association. And just 1 in 5 met fou...

THURSDAY, Nov. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes can have a healthy and safe Thanksgiving dinner if they follow certain guidelines, a diabetes expert says.

The keys are pre-planning and moderation, according to Dr. Vanessa Arguello. She is a health sciences clinical instructor in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the UCLA School of Medicine in L...

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although the number of people diagnosed with diabetes is still on the rise, the good news is that most people with the disease know they have it, a new study shows.

The research suggests that over the past two and a half decades, the percentage of undiagnosed cases has dropped significantly.

"If you're going to your doctor, you pro...

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes, researchers say.

The new study included data from a few thousand people in Sweden. The findings showed that salt intake was associated with an average 65 percent increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for each 2.5 extra grams of salt (slightly l...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans with type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes are at risk for chronic kidney disease, and another 59,000 Americans, 40 and older, are at risk for diabetes-related blindness.

That's the sobering conclusion of new research by investigators at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The good news is that, ...

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- That glass of wine or pint of beer you enjoy with dinner every night might come with an added benefit -- a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a new Danish study contends.

The researchers found that men who had 14 drinks each week and women who had nine drinks a week appeared to have the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes, compared to nondrinkers or ...

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most primary care doctors can't identify all 11 risk factors for prediabetes, a small new survey finds.

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University said their findings should prompt doctors to learn more about this condition that affects an estimated 86 million adults in the United States and could eventually lead to type 2 diabetes.

"...

WEDNESDAY, June 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Your Mom may have been right about broccoli's goodness. A small study hints that a substance in the crunchy veggy may help some with diabetes get better control of their blood sugar.

Researchers found that a concentrated extract of the substance, called sulforaphane, helped obese type 2 diabetes patients rein in their stubbornly high blood ...

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Wellness Library Results - 11

Amy Olson, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine in Springfield, may soon have to replace her favorite cookbook. She still loves the recipes, and so does her family. But the book -- Quick and Healthy Recipes and Ideas: For People Who Say They Don't Have Time to Cook Healthy Meals by Brenda Ponichtera (Scaledown, 1991) -- is so dog...

Many people with diabetes have to rethink their approach to eating. Often, that means a new approach in the kitchen, too. You can bring out great flavors in foods without adding a lot of fat, calories or salt. If your kitchen is a place where healthy menus go to die, it's time to try some new cooking tips. For starters, a diabetes-friendly kitchen doesn't come equipped with a deep-fat fryer. Dee...

For many people, nutrition labels are just part of food packaging. But if you have diabetes, those labels can be an important tool for managing your disease. You just have to know how to read them. One of the first things to look for is the "serving size" and, perhaps more important, "servings per container." This information -- usually found near the top, right underneath the words "Nutrition Fa...

Choosing healthy foods is an important step toward controlling diabetes. But healthy portions are important, too. Even the most nutritious, diabetes-friendly foods can cause trouble if you eat too much. Overeating can make both your blood sugar and your weight harder to manage. And if you're using food exchange lists to plan your meals, it's important to keep portion sizes in mind. In fact, many...

It's a New Year! Now's the perfect time to reflect on your past and make plans for the future. It's also the perfect time to recommit yourself to controlling your diabetes. Monitoring blood sugar, planning healthy meals, exercising, taking medications, and getting regular checkups shouldn't be just once-a-year resolutions. This year, make them a way of life. Here's how to tackle diabetes, this yea...

Can watching my diet help me control my diabetes? Yes. The foods you choose and the timing of your meals can make a big difference in how well you manage your condition, so it's a good idea to work out a plan with your doctor and a dietitian. The main goal will be to avoid fluctuations in the level of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. You'll also need to keep your weight under control and hold dow...

Sugar gets most of the attention, but people with diabetes need to think about salt, too. Too much sodium -- the mineral in salt -- can raise your blood pressure, and high blood pressure can threaten both your heart and your kidneys. Simply having diabetes also puts these organs at risk, and you don't want high blood pressure to add to the danger. The American Diabetes Association recommends eatin...

If a poor diet can help usher in type 2 diabetes, here's some good news: a healthy high-fiber diet can help keep it under control. In the last few decades, researchers have gotten a fix on what role specific foods might play in the development of type 2 diabetes. A six-year study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women who ate a high-sugar, low-fiber diet -- i...

Why should I be concerned about diabetes? In the United States, type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes) is reaching epidemic proportions. It has even reached an alarming number of teenagers and young adults, a group that seemed practically immune to the disease just a few decades ago. There's no mystery behind this increase in incidence. Scientists don't need to explore various the...

After you're first diagnosed with diabetes, it's normal at first to minimize the seriousness of the disease. But if the denial goes on too long and interferes with your self-care, the consequences can be dangerous. By the time my friend -- we'll call her Tina -- was diagnosed with diabetes at age 52, she should have been well-prepared to deal with her illness. She had been looking after her diabet...

If you've been diagnosed with a major illness -- like heart disease, diabetes, heart failure, cancer, or asthma -- you've probably already done a lot of research on your condition. That's a wise move. Staying informed is an important step toward staying healthy. You can learn a lot about your illness on the Internet or at a hospital library, but no Web site or medical journal in the world can tel...

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